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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members H. GUYFORD STEVER has had a career as a scientist, engineer, educator, and administrator. He was Science Advisor to Presidents Nixon and Ford and concurrently was Director of the National Science Foundation (1972-1976~. Earlier, he was President of Carnegie-Mellon University and Chief Scientist of the Air Force. Dr. Stever was Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as well as head of the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. More recently, he was President of the Universities Research Association and Foreign Secretary of the National Academy of Engineering. He currently serves on the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government. He is a member of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. After the Challenger accident, he headed the National Research Council's Solid Rocket Booster Redesign Panel and was awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. In 1989 he chaired the National Academy of Sciences/National Academy of Engineering study that led to the White Paper, "Toward a New Era in Space." ROBERT H. CANNON, JR., is Charles Lee Powell Professor and Chairman of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. His research interests include precision control of very flexible manipulators for robots and spacecraft and the space gyro experiment to test the general theory of relativity. Previously, he was Professor of Engineering and Chairman of the Division of Engineering and Applied Science at the California Institute of Technology. Between 1970 and 1974 39

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40 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS he was US Assistant Secretary of Transportation. Prior to that he had been Chief Scientist of the Air Force, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a researcher in flight control and inertial navigation systems in the aviation industry. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, and Chairman of NASA:s Flight Telerobotics Servicer Advisory Committee. He has served as Chairman of the National Research Council Assembly of Engineering and as Chairman of the President's Commission on the National Medal of Science. Dr. Cannon holds several patents and has published extensively on such subjects as the environmental impact of stratospheric flight and automatic controls for aerospace vehicles. JOSEPH G. GAVIN is a Senior Management Consultant for Grumman Corporation. He was elected President of Grumman in 1976 and retained this position until February of 1985, when he was elected Chairman of the Executive Committee. Mr. Gavin retired from Grumman in September of 1985. He was named the Aerospace Educational Council Man of the Year in 1968. In 1971, NASA awarded him its Distinguished Public Service Medal for his contributions "as the leader and representative of the Lunar Module team at Grumman." He was chief of the Grumman missile and space engineering program and director of the Lunar Module Program throughout the Apollo years. Mr. Gavin is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Astronautical Society and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Aerospace Industries Association. He recently served as a panel member on the Department of Energy Advisory Board's International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Working Party, as a board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and as a member of the Executive Committee of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. JACK L. KERREBROCK is a Fairchild Distinguished Scholar at the California Institute of Technology for 1990 and Richard Cockburn Maclau- rin Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1975. Before that he headed the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and was Associate Dean of Engineering at MIT. Dr. Kerrebrock was Associate Administrator for Aeronautics and Space Technology of NASA from 1981 to 1983. He has taught and con- ducted research in energy conversion and propulsion since 1956, when he received his PhD degree from the California Institute of Technology. His early work was on nuclear rockets, space propulsion and power, and mag- netohydrodynamic generators. More recently, he has addressed the fluid mechanics of turbomachinery for aircraft engines and gas turbines. He was Director of the MIT Gas Thrbine Laboratory from 1968 to 1978. Dr. Kerrebrock is a past and present member of several governmental advisory

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS 41 groups, including the National Commission on Space. He was decorated by the Air Force for Exceptional Civilian Service in 1981 and received the Distinguished Service Medal from NASA in 1983. Dr. Kerrebrock is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and chaired the 1989 National Research Council study on Hypersonic Technology for Military Application. LOUIS J. LANZEROlTI is a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff of AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he has worked since receiving his PhD from Harvard in 1965. Dr. Lanzerotti is concurrently an Adjunct Professor at the University of Florida, and his principal research interests include studies of planetary magnetospheres, energetic particles emitted by the sun, and the impacts of space processes on space and terrestrial technologies. Dr. Lanzerotti is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Geophysical Union. He has served on numerous NASA and National Science Foundation advisory committees concerned with space and solar-terrestrial research, chaired NASA's Space and Earth Sciences Advisory Committee, and is currently Chairman of the National Research Council's Space Studies Board. He is a recipient of NASA's Distinguished Public Service Medal. ELLIOTT C. LEVINTHAL is a Research Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate Dean for Research at Stanford University as well as Director of the Stanford Institute for Manufacturing and Automation. Previously, he has served as Director of the Defense Science Once of the Defense Advanced Research Agency, Professor (Research) of Genetics in the Stanford School of Medicine, Director of the Stanford Instrumentation Laboratory, Chief Engineer of Century Electronics, President of Levinthal Electronics Products, Inc., and Director of Research of the Instrumentation Division, Varian Associates. His research areas include applications of computers to image processing and medical instrumentation, exobiology, planetary sciences, and manufacturing science. Dr. Levinthal received his PhD from Stanford and is a member of the National Research Council's Space Studies Board and the Army Sciences Board. JAMES W. MAR is J.C. Hunsaker Professor of Aerospace Education in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is also Director of the Space Systems Laboratory and the Technology Laboratory for Advanced Composites. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on National Research Council panels on thermal protection systems, thermal

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42 BIOGRAPHICAL Sl~ETCHES OF COMMIlTEE MEMBERS protection of aerospace vehicles, and structural design with fibrous compos- ites. In addition, he is a past member of the Materials Advisory Board at the National Research Council and was a consultant to NASA's Committee on Space Vehicle Structures. Dr. Mar was Chief Scientist of the US Air Force from 1970 to 1972 and Department Head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT from 1980 to 1982. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Dr. Mar received his doctorate in civil engineering from MIT in 1949. JOHN H. McELROY is currently Dean of Engineering at the Univer- sity of Texas at Arlington. He was formerly Vice President for Technology of Hughes Communications, Inc., a subsidiary of the Hughes Aircraft Com- pany. Dr. McElroy joined Hughes in 1985 as Director of Special Projects in the Space and Communications Group, after serving as Assistant Adminis- trator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where he directed the nation's program in civil operational Earth observations from space. From 1966 to 1982, he served with NASA, where his last position was Deputy Director of Goddard Space Flight Center. He previously per- formed laser research at the Quantum Electronics Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin and taught electronics in the US Army's air defense guided missile program. Dr. McElroy is a Fellow of the In- stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Washington Academy of Sciences. He serves on many advisory committees and is Chairman of the National Research Council/Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board Committee on Advanced Space Technology. DUANE T. McRUER is President and Technical Director of Systems Technology, Inc. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Research Council Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Human Factors Society. He has chaired NASA subcommittees on Avionics, Control and Guidance and the National Research Council Committee on Space Station Engineering Design Issues. He was a member of the NRC Committee on a Commercially Developed Space Facility as well as NASA's Aeronautics Advisory Committee. Mr. McRuer's research interests are in control systems engineering, manual and automatic flight control and guidance for aerospace and land vehicles, man-machine systems, and dynamics of human operators. WILLIAM J. MERRELL, JR., is the President of Texas A&M Uni- versity, Galveston, and a Rear Admiral in the U.S. Maritime Service. He

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS 43 holds academic appointments as Professor of Oceanography and as Profes- sor of Marine Services at Texas A&M University. Dr. Merrell is a member of the National Research Council's Space Studies Board and has been a proponent of scientific programs designed to examine the Earth's climate changes. He is also Vice Chair of the Committee on Science and Technol- ogy of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. Before taking up his present position at Texas A&M, he was an Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he was in charge of the Geosciences Directorate and received the NSFs Distinguished Service Award in 1987. Dr. Merrell received his PhD in oceanography from Texas A&M University. ROBERT H. MOSER is a physician and educator who has been Vice President for Medical Affairs at The NutraSweet Company since 1986. He served as flight controller of Project Mercury, consulting member of the medical evaluation team for Project Gemini, and consultant to Project Apollo. From 1984 to 1987 he was Chairman of the NASA Life Sciences Advisory Committee. Dr. Moser received his MD from Georgetown Uni- versity and entered the Army, where he held many positions, including that of battalion surgeon in Korea; Chief of Medical Services for the US Army Hospital, Salzburg, Austria; Assistant Chief of Medicine, US Army Wiper General Hospital; Chief of Medicine, William Beaumont General Hospital; Chief of Medicine, Brooke Army Hospital; and Chief of Medicine, Walter Reed General Hospital. Dr. Moser retired in 1969 to become Chief of Staff of the Maui (Hawaii) Memorial Hospital and Clinical Professor of Medicine at Hawaii University from 1969 to 1977, at present is Adjunct Professor of Medicine of Northwestern University Medical School and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and Executive Vice President of the American College of Physicians from 1977 to 1986. He is the author of Diseases of Medical Progress and has contributed over 150 articles to medical science journals and medical books. He is a member of the National Research Council's Space Studies Board. EBERHARDT RECHTIN is Professor of Engineering at the Univer- sity of Southern California. He was President of Aerospace Corporation from 1977 to 1987; Chief Engineer of Hewlett Packard; Assistant Secretary of Defense for Telecommunications; Principal Deputy Director, Research and Engineering; and Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency, US Department of Defense. From 1949 to 1967, he was on the staff of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where his positions included those of Direc- tor of the NASA,/JPL deep space communications program and Assistant Director for Hacking and Data Acquisition. Dr. Rechtin has received nu- merous awards, including the NASA Medal of Science, the Distinguished Public Service Award for the US Navy, and the von Karman Lectureship in

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44 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS Astronautics. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, as well as an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Environmental Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, served on the 1986 National Research Council Committee on Post-Challenger Assessment of Space Shuttle Flight Rates and Utilization and the 1987 Committee on the Space Station, and now serves on the NRC's Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems. THOMAS P. STAFFORD, Lt. General? US Air Force (ret.), currently heads the aerospace consulting firms of Defense Technologies, Inc., in Oklahoma City, and Stafford, Burke, and Hecker in Washington, D.C. He was an astronaut during the Gemini and Apollo programs, including serving as pilot of Gemini 6, command pilot for Gemini 9, and commander of Apollo 10 and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. He was later head of the astronaut corps and deputy director of flight crew operations at NASH In 1975, he became Commander of the Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards Air Force Base and, later, Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Research, Development and Acquisitions. General Stafford holds a number of honorary degrees and serves on several advisory boards. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Astronautical Society and the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, as well as a member of the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He served on the NRC 1987 review of the Space Station Program and on the 1988 Committee on Space Station Engineering Design Issues. LAURENCE R. YOUNG is a Professor of Aeronautics and Astro- nautics and Director of the Man-Vehicle Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His area of expertise is biomedical engineering, with a special emphasis on space medicine and biology. Dr. Young was a principal investigator on vestibular experiments aboard Spacelabs -1, -2, D-1, and SLS-1, and is the inventor of an eye movement monitor used in vestibular and other physiological research. He has been on the fac- ulty of MIT since 1962, having received his ScD there in the same year. Dr. Young is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Aerospace Medicine Association, and the American Institute of Aeronau- tics and Astronautics. He is a charter member and Past President of the Biomedical Engineering Society and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has served on numerous national boards and committees, including the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and the National Research Council Committees on Human Factors, Space Sta- tion Engineering Design Issues, and Advanced Space Technology to Meet Future Needs.