APPENDIX B
International Polar Year Committee Biographies

Robin Bell, chair, is a Doherty Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University where she directs research programs on the Hudson River and in Antarctica. Dr. Bell is a geophysicist who earned her Ph.D. in 1989 from Columbia University. Her research interests are in linking the Earth’s physical processes with the impacts on biota. These interests range from linking glacial and tectonic process to subglacial ecosystems, to understanding the ecosystem services provided to humans by rivers, estuaries and coastal environments. She is currently the U.S. representative to the Working Group on Geophysics of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and vice-chair of the ICSU Planning Group for the International Polar Year.

Mary Albert is a senior research scientist at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory. She is also adjunct professor at the Thayer School of Engineering and the Environmental Sciences Department at Dartmouth College. Her research interests include flow and transport in porous media, surface-air physical and chemical exchange processes, snow physics, numerical modeling, effects of post depositional processes in snow and firn on ice core interpretation and on atmospheric composition. She has spent many field seasons conducting research in the deep field in Greenland and Antarctica and is a member of the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board. Dr. Albert earned her Ph.D. in applied mechanics and engineering sciences in 1991 from the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Albert is chair of the U.S. National Committee for the International Polar Year.

David Bromwich is a senior research scientist and director of the Polar Meteorology Group at the Byrd Polar Research Center of the Ohio State University. He is also a professor with the Atmospheric Sciences Program of the Department of Geography. Dr. Bromwich’s research interests include the climatic impacts of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets; coupled mesoscale-global circulation model simulations; the atmospheric moisture budget of high southern latitudes, Greenland, and the Arctic basin using numerical analyses; and the influence of tropical ocean-atmosphere variability on the polar regions. Dr. Bromwich has served on the



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 41
International Polar Year 2007–2008: Report of the Implementation Workshop APPENDIX B International Polar Year Committee Biographies Robin Bell, chair, is a Doherty Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University where she directs research programs on the Hudson River and in Antarctica. Dr. Bell is a geophysicist who earned her Ph.D. in 1989 from Columbia University. Her research interests are in linking the Earth’s physical processes with the impacts on biota. These interests range from linking glacial and tectonic process to subglacial ecosystems, to understanding the ecosystem services provided to humans by rivers, estuaries and coastal environments. She is currently the U.S. representative to the Working Group on Geophysics of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and vice-chair of the ICSU Planning Group for the International Polar Year. Mary Albert is a senior research scientist at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory. She is also adjunct professor at the Thayer School of Engineering and the Environmental Sciences Department at Dartmouth College. Her research interests include flow and transport in porous media, surface-air physical and chemical exchange processes, snow physics, numerical modeling, effects of post depositional processes in snow and firn on ice core interpretation and on atmospheric composition. She has spent many field seasons conducting research in the deep field in Greenland and Antarctica and is a member of the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board. Dr. Albert earned her Ph.D. in applied mechanics and engineering sciences in 1991 from the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Albert is chair of the U.S. National Committee for the International Polar Year. David Bromwich is a senior research scientist and director of the Polar Meteorology Group at the Byrd Polar Research Center of the Ohio State University. He is also a professor with the Atmospheric Sciences Program of the Department of Geography. Dr. Bromwich’s research interests include the climatic impacts of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets; coupled mesoscale-global circulation model simulations; the atmospheric moisture budget of high southern latitudes, Greenland, and the Arctic basin using numerical analyses; and the influence of tropical ocean-atmosphere variability on the polar regions. Dr. Bromwich has served on the

OCR for page 41
International Polar Year 2007–2008: Report of the Implementation Workshop National Research Council’s Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data and was previously a U.S. Representative of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. He is a member of the American Meteorological Society, the American Geophysical Union, the Royal Meteorological Society, and the American Association of Geographers. Dr. Bromwich earned his Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1979. Richard Glenn is the vice president of lands for the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation. His professional experience includes petroleum geological studies, field geological mapping, structural geological and seismic interpretation, permafrost, methane hydrate, and borehole temperature profile research. Other specialties include year-round studies of the physical properties of sea ice near Barrow, Alaska; and temperature, salinity and crystallographic profiles of first- and multi-year sea ice and documentation of freeze-up, ice movement events, and spring thaw. He has served as director of the Department of Energy Management, North Slope Borough; general manager of Barrow Technical Services, a technical firm that provided project management consulting and geological and scientific research support services; and a geologist for the Arctic Slope Consulting Group. Mr. Glenn is a member of the Ilisagvik College Board of Trustees, board president of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium, and former member of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission. Mr. Glenn is an Alaska native and earned his master’s in geology from the University of Fairbanks. David Karl is a professor of oceanography at the University of Hawaii. His research interests include marine microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, long-term time-series studies of climate and ecosystem variability, and the ocean’s role in regulating the global concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. Dr. Karl is a member of the Polar Research Board. He earned his Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, in 1978. Peter Schlosser is the Vinton Professor of Earth and Environmental Engineering and professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University and senior research scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. He also is the associate director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, in 1985. Dr. Schlosser’s research interests include studies of water movement and its variability in natural systems (oceans, lakes, rivers, groundwater) using natural and anthropogenic trace substances and isotopes as “dyes” or as “radioactive clocks”; ocean/atmosphere gas exchange; reconstruction of continental paleotemperature records using groundwater as an archive; and anthropogenic impacts on natural systems. He participated in seven major ocean expeditions, five to the polar regions. He was or presently is a member or chair of national and international science steering committees, including the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, the Climate Variability and Predictability Experiment, the World Climate Research

OCR for page 41
International Polar Year 2007–2008: Report of the Implementation Workshop Program, the Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study, and the Study of Environmental Arctic Change. Philip M. Smithp consults on science policy and management. As an organization executive, chair, or member of advisory committees, and a science and technology policy consultant, he is a leader in developing effective national and international science and technology policies and an expert in theory and practice of providing scientific advice to governments and international organizations. Dr. Smith was executive officer of the National Research Council for 13 years. He previously held senior positions in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Office of Management and Budget, and the National Science Foundation. He participated in the International Geophysical Year (IGY) and was involved in the organization and management of the U.S. Antarctic Program that followed the IGY. From 1995 through 2003 he consulted through the partnership McGeary and Smith. He served on several recent NRC committees, which reviewed the science, technology, and health aspects of the foreign policy agenda of the United States, the science advisory mechanisms of the United Nations system, and the role of science and technology in countering terrorism. Dr. Smith led a review of the mission, organization, and operating practices of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research and, with Michael McGeary, evaluated the organization and function of seven U.S. national committees for the international unions in the mathematical and physical sciences of the International Council for Science. He was awarded a D.Sc. (honoris causa) by North Carolina State University in recognition of his public service in science and technology policy. Douglas Wiens is a professor of earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. His research interests include the structure of island arcs and oceanic spreading centers, anisotropy and flow patterns in the mantle, and the crustal and upper-mantle structure of Antarctica. He has directed field instrumentation programs in the Antarctic Peninsula and Trans-Antarctic Mountains. Dr. Wiens has served on the executive committee of the Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology, the RIDGE and MARGINS steering committees, the Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrumentation Pool oversight committee (as chair), and the Ocean Drilling Program Science Committee. He earned his Ph.D. in geological sciences from Northwestern University in 1985. Warren Zapol, M.D. is the Reginald Jenny Professor of Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and Anesthetist-in-Chief at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Zapol has worked for many years in the Antarctic studying the adaptations of antarctic seals that allow them to breath-hold dive for over an hour at seawater depths over 600 meters. His seal research group was the first to use microprocessors (diving computers) for physiological monitoring and blood sampling of marine mammals free swimming under the antarctic fast ice. Our understanding of the strategy marine mammals use to avoid the bends and hypoxia (low blood oxygen

OCR for page 41
International Polar Year 2007–2008: Report of the Implementation Workshop levels) is based upon their blood nitrogen and oxygen measurements in free diving seals. Dr. Zapol is also interested in the safe and thoughtful study of various animal species, including marine mammals, to advance medical science and the therapy of critically ill humans. In 2003 he was awarded the Inventor of the Year Award for the treatment of hypoxic human newborns with inhaled nitric oxide, a lifesaving technique that he pioneered. Dr. Zapol is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. NRC Staff Sheldon Drobot has been a program officer at the Polar Research Board and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate since December 2002. He received his Ph.D. in geosciences (climatology specialty) from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Dr. Drobot has directed National Research Council studies that produced the reports Elements of a Science Plan for the North Pacific Research Board (2004), Climate Data Records from Environmental Satellites (2004), and A Vision for the International Polar Year 2007-2008. His research interests include sea ice-atmosphere interactions, microwave remote sensing, statistics, and long-range climate outlooks. Dr. Drobot will be joining the University of Colorado in December 2004, where he will continue researching interannual variability and trends in Arctic sea ice conditions and how low-frequency atmospheric circulation affects sea ice distribution, short-range forecasting of Great Lakes ice conditions, and biological implications of sea ice variability. Chris Elfring is director of the Polar Research Board (PRB) and Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC). She is responsible for all aspects of strategic planning, project development and oversight, financial management, and personnel for both units. Since joining the PRB in 1996, Ms. Elfring has overseen or directed studies that produced the following reports: Frontiers in Polar Biology in the Genomics Era (2003), Cumulative Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas Activities on Alaska's North Slope (2003), A Century of Ecosystem Science: Planning Long-term Research in the Gulf of Alaska (2002), and Enhancing NASA's Contributions to Polar Science (2001). In addition, she is responsible for the Board’ s activities as the U.S. National Committee to the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. Rachael Shiflett is a senior project assistant with the Polar Research Board. She received her M.Sc. in environmental law from Vermont Law School in 2001 and will complete her J.D. at Catholic University in May 2007. Her research interests include the Endangered Species Act, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act.