Appendixes



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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health Appendixes

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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health This page intentionally left blank.

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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health A Biographies of Committee Members Mary Wakefield, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., Chair, is Director and Professor, Center for Rural Health at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Grand Forks, North Dakota; and Adjunct Professor at the University of North Dakota College of Nursing. Previously she was Professor and Director, Center for Health Policy, at George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. In the 1990s, she served in staff positions in the U.S. Senate, culminating with the position of Chief of Staff to Senator Kent Conrad. Throughout her tenure on Capitol Hill, Dr. Wakefield advised on a range of public health policy issues, drafted legislative proposals, and worked with interest groups and other Senate offices. She cochaired the Senate Rural Health Caucus Staff Organization. In this capacity, she was directly involved with a wide range of rural health policy issues, including recruitment and retention of health care providers, reimbursement, emergency services, and telemedicine, among others. Dr. Wakefield’s major research interests and expertise encompass the quality of rural health care, Native American health issues, the rural workforce, rural emergency medical services, rural patient safety, and Medicare payment policies and related impacts on rural providers. She has served on many advisory and expert committees, including MEDPAC; the National Advisory Committee on Rural Health, Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS); and committees of the IOM. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Health Care Services.

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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health Calvin Beale, M.S., is Senior Demographer, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. His research has focused on topics related to the populations of rural and small-town America, including race and ethnic composition, distribution, migration, poverty, and growth and decline, as well as the implications of trends for public policy. He has written more than 100 articles and reports on demographic subjects. He is also author of a book of collected writings—A Taste of the Country—edited by Peter Morrison (1990), and coauthor of two books, Rural and Small Town America (1989) and Economic Areas of the United States (1961). In 2002, he was honored by the Rural Sociological Society and the Annie Casey Foundation for his work in the field of rural demography. Andrew Coburn, Ph.D., is Professor of Health Policy and Management, Director of the Institute for Health Policy, and Associate Dean at the Muskie School of Public Service, University of Southern Maine. Dr. Coburn’s research has addressed the problems of rural health care delivery and financing, health insurance and the uninsured, and Medicaid policy. In the early 1990s he established the Maine Rural Health Research Center, which has focused on rural health insurance coverage, behavioral health, rural hospitals, and long-term care issues. His research addresses problems of rural health care financing and delivery, including rural quality and patient safety, health insurance coverage, and rural hospitals. His recent research includes studies of rural hospital patient safety, the impact of the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility program, and patterns of health coverage for rural populations. Dr. Coburn has published widely on these topics and has testified often before Congress on the rural impacts of federal policy changes. He currently serves on the Rural Policy Research Institute’s Expert Panel on Rural Health Delivery. He has been an active member of Academy Health and the National Academy for State Health Policy. He received the National Rural Health Association’s Distinguished Researcher Award in 2001. Don E. Detmer, M.D., M.A., is Professor Emeritus and Professor of Medical Education, Department of Health Evaluation Sciences, University of Virginia, and Senior Associate, Judge Institute of Management, University of Cambridge. He is Vice Chair of the China Medical Board of New York, Inc., Chair of Section 12 of the membership committee of the IOM, a Trustee of the Nuffield Trust of London, Cochair of the Blue Ridge Group, Research Director of the J&J Centre for Advancing Health Information, and Chair of the International Committee of the American Medical Informatics Associa-

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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health tion. He is a lifetime Associate of the National Academies and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Academy Health, and the American Colleges of Medical Informatics, Surgeons, and Sports Medicine. From 1999 to 2003, he was Dennis Gillings Professor of Health Management and Director, Cambridge University Health, the health policy center at the Judge Institute of Management, Cambridge’s business school. Prior to his years in England, he was Vice President for Health Sciences at the Universities of Virginia and Utah and on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is immediate past Chairman of the Board on Health Care Services of the IOM and the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and has also chaired the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine. His education included a medical degree from the University of Kansas and subsequent training at the National Institutes of Health, the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Duke University Medical Center, the IOM, and Harvard Business School. His masters degree is from the University of Cambridge. Dr. Detmer’s career includes innovative work in national health information policy, quality improvement, administrative medicine, vascular surgery, sports medicine, and masters-level education programs for clinician-executives. Jim Grigsby, Ph.D., is Associate Professor, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (UCHSC), in Denver, Colorado, and Associate Director of the Center for Health Services Research at UCHSC. Since 1993 he has studied different aspects of telemedicine, especially implemention in rural settings. His most recent work on telehealth has focused on the diffusion of technology in home health care and in chronic disease management. His current research includes medication errors during inpatient–outpatient care transitions, the effectiveness of telemedicine, telemedicine payment policy, telehealth and rural mental health, effects of cognitive impairment on the effectiveness of chronic disease self-management in older adults, effects on cognition of cancer chemotherapy, and the characterization of clinical and neuroradiological features of a novel neurodegenerative disorder affecting older male carriers of Fragile X syndrome. Dr. Grisby has worked closely with rural telemedicine providers and researchers in Iowa, North Carolina, and Nebraska, and was involved in the development of a project to assess the suitability of telehealth technology for critical access hospitals in Wisconsin. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals; authored chapters in books, technical reports, and monographs; and written letters in scientific journals on telemedicine and on the use of simulated neural net-

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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health works to predict risk-adjusted medical outcomes. Dr. Grigsby is on the editorial board of the Telemedicine Journal and e-Health and served on the Technical Advisory Panel to the IOM Committee on Telemedicine. David Hartley, Ph.D., M.H.A., is Director, Division of Rural Health, Muskie School of Public Service, at the University of Southern Maine, Portland. His current research is focused on rural mental health services, the mental health workforce, the rural safety net, rural hospital scope of services, and a national evaluation of the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program. His doctorate is in health services research, policy and administration, and biomedical ethics. He has published many reports, monographs, and articles, several of which address issues of rural mental and behavioral health, rural health networks, and the rural safety net. He has presented papers at meetings of Academy Health, the National Conference of State Mental Health Program Directors, and the National Rural Health Association, as well as regional meetings of the National Association of State Offices of Rural Health and the New England and Maine Rural Health Associations. He also sits on the National Rural Health Association’s Rural Health Policy Board. Dr. Hartley received the National Rural Health Association’s Distinguished Researcher Award in 2003. Sandral Hullett, M.D., M.P.H., is CEO of Jefferson Health System/Cooper Green Hospital in Birmingham, Alabama. She was formerly Executive Director of Family HealthCare of America, a not-for-profit community health center serving 40 rural counties throughout Alabama. Her interests include rural health care and health care planning and delivery of care to the underserved, underinusured, and poor. She was awarded the University of Alabama School of Public Health’s first Public Health Hero Award for her work in providing compassionate care to people living in Alabama’s rural, impoverished Black Belt communities. Dr. Hullett is a member of the IOM and has served on several IOM committees, including the Committee on the Changing Market, Managed Care, and Future Viability of Safety Net Providers. Dr. Hullett received her M.D. from the Medical College of Pennsylvania and her M.P.H. from the University of Alabama. A. Clinton MacKinney, M.D., M.S., is a Senior Consultant with Stroudwater Associates, assisting rural hospitals in implementing performance improvements. In addition, he works as a rural emergency department physician in Little Falls, Minnesota, and as a health services researcher with the Rural

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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health Policy and Research Institute (RUPRI) Research Center, Nebraska Medical Center. Until recently, he served as Medical Director for Health Partners Central Minnesota Clinics in St. Cloud, Minnesota. Prior to assuming that position, he practiced family medicine for 14 years in a rural Iowa community of 4,000. Dr. MacKinney’s experience and research interests include geriatrics, chronic disease management, hospital/physician relationships, community health systems development, rural health quality, and rural health policy. He is a member of the RUPRI Health Panel and serves on several boards of nonprofit organizations, such as the Roundhouse Group and the Minnesota Center for Rural Health. Dr. MacKinney has lectured and published on rural health, and has served on committees for the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the National Rural Health Association. Ira Moscovice, Ph.D., is Professor, Division of Health Services Research and Policy, at the University of Minnesota. He is director of the Rural Health Research Center at the University of Minnesota and has written extensively on issues related to rural health care and the use of health services research to improve health policy decision making in state government. Dr. Moscovice was the first recipient of the National Rural Health Association’s Distinguished Researcher Award in 1992. In 2002, he received a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy Research. He has served as principal investigator for numerous rural health studies funded by, among others, the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Northwest Area Foundation. His current research interests include the implementation and assessment of rural health networks and managed care, the evaluation of alternative rural health care delivery systems, and the quality of rural health care. Dr. Moscovice currently serves on the Health Services Research Study Section of AHRQ and the National Advisory Committee of the Coming Home Program of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and previously served on the IOM’s Access to Health Care Services Monitoring Committee. Roger Rosenblatt, M.D., M.P.H., M.F.R., is Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Family Medicine, and Adjunct Professor, Department of Health Services, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, at the University of Washington. He is founder and co-Principal Investigator of the Rural

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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health Health Research Center at the University of Washington. He has done extensive research in the delivery of health services to rural populations in the United States and around the world. He is particularly interested in improving the supply and the quality of health services in isolated and sparsely populated areas, and has published widely on these issues. He has worked as a Medical Officer and a Regional Program Director for the National Health Service Corps of the United States Public Health Service, has been a consultant to a number of governmental agencies that deal with rural health services, and has testified before Congress on these issues. He is a member of several associations and organizations, including the American Public Health Association, Academy Health, the National Rural Health Association, the Region X Rural Health Coordinating Committee, and the Rural Hospital Facilities Task Force. Tim Size, M.B.A, B.S.E., has been Executive Director of the 29-hospital Rural Wisconsin Health Cooperative since helping to found it in 1979 while working as an administrator at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics. He helped start HMO of Wisconsin in 1984, leading to varied experience with rural managed care. He represents a rural health perspective on numerous boards and commissions within Wisconsin. He is past President of the National Rural Health Association and served as a member of then DHHS Secretary Donna Shalala’s National Advisory Committee on Rural Health. He is currently serving on DHHS Secretary Tommy Thompson’s National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. He was a Kellogg National Fellow and has received the National Rural Health Association’s Louis Gorin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Rural Health Care. He lays claim to the only monthly cartoon series in the country focused on rural health. Linda Watson, M.L.S., is Associate Dean and Director, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia, and Lecturer in the School of Medicine’s Department of Health Evaluation Sciences. She was President of the Medical Library Association in 2002–2003 and currently serves on the National Institutes of Health’s PubMed Central National Advisory Committee. Her prior experience includes 10 years at the National Library of Medicine, where she held various management positions, specializing in nonprint media. She has published and made many presentations in her field. She has managed several grant projects, including, among others, establishment of a partnership between the University of Virginia and the Danville Regional

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Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health Medical Center for improving information access in rural south-central Virginia, and Grateful Med Outreach to rural nurses and physicians in Virginia. She has developed programs for the rural outreach of medical information into the far corners of southwest Virginia for both health professionals and citizens, and has recently worked with the Hispanic migrant population in the rural Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.