APPENDIXES



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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments APPENDIXES

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments APPENDIX A COMMITTEE AND STAFF BIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION John Edward Porter (Chair) is a partner in the Washington, DC, law firm of Hogan & Hartson. He previously served 21 years as US representative from the 10th district in Illinois. In Congress, he served on the Appropriations Committee, as chair of the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education; as vice-chair of the Subcommittee on Foreign Operations; and as vice-chair of the Subcommittee on Military Construction. Before his election to Congress, Porter served in the Illinois House of Representatives. He attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and received his undergraduate degree from Northwestern University, served in the US Army, and graduated with distinction from the University of Michigan Law School, where he was an editor of the Michigan Law Review. He served as an Honor Law Graduate attorney with the US Department of Justice in the Kennedy administration. He was founder and co-chairman of the Congressional Human Rights Caucus, a voluntary association of more than 250 members of Congress working to identify, monitor, and end human-rights violations worldwide. He wrote the legislation creating Radio Free Asia. He served as chair of the Global Legislators Organized for a Balanced Environment (GLOBE USA). Porter is a member of a number of boards, including those of the Rand Corporation, the Brookings Institution, PBS, Research! America, the American Heart Association, the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, and the Population Resource Center. He is a trustee emeritus of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments Arts and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Porter has received more than 275 awards for his service in Congress, including the Mary Wood Lasker Award for Public Service, the Edwin C. Whitehead Award for Medical Research Advocacy from Research! America, the Public Service Award from the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, the American Society for Cell Biology Service Award, the American Society for Microbiology Award for Distinguished Public Service, the Award for Public Service Excellence from the Association of American Medical Colleges, the Schachman Public Service Award of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and the Davis Award of the American Medical Association. Maxine L. Savitz [NAE] (Vice-Chair) is a principal at the Washington Advisory Group. She is the former deputy assistant secretary for conservation, US Department of Energy (DOE), and received the DOE Outstanding Service Medal in 1981. Before her DOE service, she was program manager for Research Applied to National Needs at the National Science Foundation. After her government service, Savitz served in executive positions in the private sector; she was president of Lighting Research Institute, assistant to the vice president for engineering at The Garrett Corporation, and general manager of Allied Signal Ceramic Components. She recently retired from the position of general manager for technology partnerships at Honeywell. Savitz is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was appointed to the National Science Board in 1998. She is a member of the DOE Laboratory Operations Board and of advisory bodies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Savitz also serves on the boards of directors of the Draper Laboratory and of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. She received a BA in chemistry from Bryn Mawr College and a PhD in organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments E. Edward David [NAE/NAS] is the president of EED, Inc. and consults on R&D, strategic planning and management, intellectual property, technology transfer, enhancing corporate research programs, and developing corporate-academic research partnerships for the Washington Advisory Group. He received his PhD in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. David served as science adviser to the president of the United States and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1970 to 1973. From 1977 to 1986, he was president of Exxon Research and Engineering Company. He spent the first 2 decades of his research career at Bell Telephone Laboratories and became the executive director. He is on the boards of several businesses and on technical advisory boards nationally and abroad. Frank Press [NAS] is a principal with the Washington Advisory Group. He was president of the National Academy of Sciences and chairman of the National Research Council from 1981 to 1993 and science adviser to the president of the United States and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1977 to 1980. Before that, he was professor of geophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and chairman of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. Press was also professor of geophysics at the California Institute of Technology and director of the Seismological Laboratory. He is a life member of the corporation of MIT and board member of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Marine Biological Laboratory, and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. He is a director of a medical diagnostic device company. He was the Cecil and Ida Green Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1993 to 1997. Since 1993, Press has been a visiting professor at Cornell University, the California Institute of Technology, Stanford University, and Indiana University. He has been elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Astronomical Society, the Royal Society (London), the Russian Academy of

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments Sciences, and the Academie des Sciences (France). He is the recipient of 30 honorary degrees. Among his awards are the US National Medal of Science, the Vannevar Bush Award, and the Pupin Medal from Columbia University. Press received the Japan Prize from the emperor in 1993. He was awarded the “Great Gold” Lomonosov medal, the highest award of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He earned a BS from the City College of New York and an MA and PhD from Columbia University. John P. McTague [NAE] is professor of materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He formerly served as vice president for laboratory management at the University of California, which oversees the Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos National Laboratories. McTague was vice president of research and vice president of technical affairs for the Ford Motor Company. He also served as the acting science adviser to the president of the United States and the deputy director and later acting director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy beginning in 1986. Before that, he taught chemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles and Columbia University and was the director of the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Physical Society. He received his PhD in physical chemistry from Brown University. Richard A. Meserve [NAE] assumed the presidency of the Carnegie Institution in April 2003 after stepping down as chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Meserve had been with the commission since October 1999. Before joining the commission, he was a partner in the Washington, DC, law firm of Covington & Burling and now serves as Senior of Counsel. With his Harvard law degree, received in 1975, and his PhD in applied physics from Stanford University, awarded in 1976, he devoted his legal practice

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments to technical issues arising in environmental and toxic tort litigation, counseling scientific societies and high-technology companies, and nuclear licensing. Early in his career, he served as legal counsel to the president’s science adviser and was a law clerk to US Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun and to Judge Benjamin Kaplan of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Meserve has served on numerous legal and scientific committees over the years, including many chartered by the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. Among other affiliations, he is a member of the American Philosophical Society, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the American Physical Society. Meserve serves on the Board of Directors of AAAS. Ernest J. Moniz is a professor of physics and director of energy studies at the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he has served on the faculty since 1973. Moniz served as under secretary of energy from October 1997 to January 2001. He also served from 1995 to 1997 as associate director for science in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President, where his responsibilities spanned the physical, life, and social and behavioral sciences, science education, and university-government partnerships. At MIT, Moniz served as head of the Department of Physics and as director of the Bates Linear Accelerator Center. His principal research contributions have been in theoretical nuclear physics, particularly in advancing nuclear-reaction theory at high energy. Moniz received a BS in physics from Boston College, a doctorate in theoretical physics from Stanford University, and honorary doctorates from the University of Athens and the University of Erlangen-Nurenburg. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Humboldt Foundation, and the American Physical Society and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Moniz received the

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments 1998 Seymour Cray HPCC Industry Recognition Award for vision and leadership in advancing scientific simulation. John H. Moxley III [IOM] is the managing director of the North American Health Care Division and a partner of the Physician Executive Practice of Korn/Ferry International. His National Academies experience includes membership on the Information Panel of the Council on Health Care Technology, the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP) 2000 Panel on Ensuring the Best Science and Technology Presidential Appointments, the Board on Army Science and Technology, and the Naval Studies Board. He was formerly appointed the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs in the Carter Administration and remained through the Reagan Administration. He held deanships at the University of Maryland and the University of California, San Diego medical schools. He is board-certified in internal medicine and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a Distinguished Fellow of the American College of Physician Executives. He has served the American Hospital Association as a Trustee, the California Medical Association as a Trustee and as Chairman of the Scientific Board, the American Medical Association as Chairman of the Council on Scientific Affairs, the National Fund for Medical Education and the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine as a trustee. He served as a consultant to the Food and Drug Administration and was awarded the Commissioner’s Special Citation for Outstanding Service, and has received the Secretary of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service and a Citation for Special Achievement from the American Hospital Association. He received the Bachelor of Arts degree from Williams College and the Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Colorado. Robert Serafin [NAE] earned a BS degree from the University of Notre Dame, a master’s degree from Northwestern University, and

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments a PhD from the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), all in electrical engineering, with a doctoral specialty in radar meteorology. He began his career at Hazeltine Research Corporation in Plainview, New York, where he worked on the design and development of high-resolution radar systems. After 10 years at IIT and the IIT Research Institute, he joined the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in 1973 to lead its Doppler radar meteorology development as manager of the Field Observing Facility. In 1983, Serafin became director of the Atmospheric Technology Division, which is responsible for NCAR’s observational research and research-support facilities, used by scientists in universities and laboratories throughout the world. In 1989, he was appointed director of NCAR, from which he recently retired. The holder of three patents, Serafin has published more than 50 technical and scientific papers. He established the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology and was its coeditor for several years. He has served on several National Research Council panels and committees and chaired the Committee on the National Weather Service Modernization. He chairs the Research Council Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and in June 2004 will complete a 3-year term as a member of the Space Studies Board. He is a Fellow and past president of the American Meteorological Society, and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Louis W. Sullivan [IOM] is founder and president emeritus of the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta. The school became independent from Morehouse College in 1981, with Sullivan as president and dean. In 1989, he left the school to serve as secretary of health and human services, and in 1993 he returned as president. Sullivan is chair of the President’s Advisory Council on Black Colleges and Universities and cochair of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS. He graduated from Morehouse College in 1954 with a BS in biology. He earned an MD from the Boston University School of Medicine in 1958 and completed an internship

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments and residency in internal medicine at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. He was a research fellow in hematology at the Thorndike-Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital from 1961 to 1964. In 1966, he began serving as codirector of hematology at Boston University Medical Center and then founded the Boston University Hematology Service at Boston City Hospital. He continued as a faculty member at the Boston University School of Medicine until 1975, when he returned to Morehouse College. Sullivan is the founding president of the Association of Minority Health Professions Schools and is active in numerous other civic organizations, including the Boy Scouts of America. Christine Todd Whitman served in the cabinet of President George W. Bush as Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator from January 2001 to June 2003. Before working at EPA, she served as the 50th governor of New Jersey, the first woman elected to that state’s highest office. She served as governor for 7 years, from 1993 to 2000. Currently, she sits on the Board of Directors of S.C. Johnson and Son, Inc., Texas Instruments Incorporated, United Technologies Corporation, and the Chicago Climate Exchange, Inc. Whitman is also a member of the Steering Committee of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey Leadership Council. She is the cochair of the National Smart Growth Council, an initiative of Smart Growth America. In addition, she is a member of the newly formed Center for Civic Engagement and Volunteerism Advisory Board at Raritan Community College. Before becoming governor, Whitman was president of the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities and served on the Somerset County Board of Freeholders. Staff Deborah Stine (Study Director) is associate director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP) and director of the Office of Special Projects. She has

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments worked on various projects at the National Academies since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study for COSEPUP, on policy implications of greenhouse warming, a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management, and two awards from the Policy and Global Affairs Division for her dissemination efforts for National Academies reports. Other studies have addressed human reproductive cloning, science and technology centers, international benchmarking of US research fields, graduate and postdoctoral education, responsible conduct of research, careers in science and engineering, and many environmental topics. She holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine; a master’s degree in business administration; and a PhD in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from the American University. Before coming to the National Academies, she was a mathematician for the US Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the state of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. Kathi E. Hanna is a science and health policy consultant, writer, and editor specializing in biomedical research policy and bioethics. She served as research director and senior consultant to President Clinton’s National Bioethics Advisory Commission and as senior adviser to President Clinton’s Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans Illnesses. More recently, she served as the lead author and editor of President George W. Bush’s Task Force to Improve Health Care Delivery for Our Nation’s Veterans. In the 1980s and 1990s, Hanna was a senior analyst at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment, contributing to numerous science policy studies requested by congressional committees on science education, research funding, biotechnology, women’s health, human genetics, bioethics, and reproductive technologies. In the last decade, she has served as an analyst and editorial consultant to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments Health, the Institute of Medicine, several charitable foundations, voluntary health organizations, and biotechnology companies. Before coming to Washington, DC, she was the genetics coordinator at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago, where she directed clinical counseling and coordinated an international research program in prenatal diagnosis. Hanna received an AB in biology from Lafayette College, an MS in human genetics from Sarah Lawrence College, and a PhD from the School of Business and Public Management, George Washington University. Henry B. Hogue earned his PhD in public administration, specializing in American government, from the American University in 2001. His areas of study and publication since that time have included the presidential appointment process, the President’s recess appointment authority, electronic government, and other topics related to federal government organization and management. He works as an analyst at the Congressional Research Service (CRS) at the Library of Congress. The views expressed in his work for this project are his own and do not represent CRS or the Library. Russell Moy is a senior staff officer in the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy at the National Academies, where he works on issues related to international trade, intellectual-property policies, intellectual-property enforcement technologies, and technology management. From 2000 to 2001, Moy was a policy analyst in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he supported interagency technology-development activities on international trade, health care, and nanotechnology. Earlier he served as a policy analyst in technology administration at the US Department of Commerce on the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. Before coming to Washington, DC, Moy was the group leader for energy-storage programs at Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Michigan. He holds a JD from Wayne State

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: Ensuring the Best Presidential and Federal Advisory Committee Science and Technology Appointments University School of Law. He earned a PhD and an MS in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan and a BS in chemical engineering from Case Western Reserve University. John H. Trattner is senior writer and editor of the nonprofit and nonpartisan Council for Excellence in Government. He has published eight books since 1988. Among these are the six volumes to date of the well-received Prune Book series published by Brookings Institutions Press. He is also the author of A Survivors Guide for Government Executives and a report on UN Reform and US Financial Support. From 1957 to 1963, Trattner was a reporter for the Associated Press and a freelance correspondent in Europe for CBS News, Time, and Newsweek. He has also written articles for the New York Times, the Christian Science Monitor, the Washington Quarterly, and the International Herald Tribune. He has served as a US diplomat for over 20 years specializing in press relations and public affairs in US embassies in Warsaw, Paris, and Brussels. After leaving the Department of State in 1982, Trattner served as press secretary to Senator George Mitchell from 1983 to 1985. Trattner graduated from Yale University in 1952 and did graduate study in music composition at Columbia and Yale Universities. He served as a communications officer on active duty with the US Navy in 1953-1957. He has also won the Superior Award of the US Information Agency and the Kellogg Prize of the Yale Graduate School of Music.

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