G
Biographical Information for Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

LOUIS J. LANZEROTTI (Chair) currently consults for Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, and is a distinguished professor of solar-terrestrial research at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Dr. Lanzerotti’s principal research interests have included space plasmas, geophysics, and engineering problems related to the impact of space processes on space and terrestrial technologies. He was chair (1984-1988) of NASA’s Space and Earth Science Advisory Committee and a member of the 1990 Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program. He has also served as chair (1988-1994) of the Space Studies Board and as a member (1991-1993) of the Vice President’s Space Policy Advisory Board. In 2004 he was nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate for a 6-year term on the National Science Board. He has served on numerous NASA, National Science Foundation, and university advisory bodies concerned with space and geophysics research. He is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Geophysical Union, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has an extensive history of NRC service.

STEVEN J. BATTEL, a private consultant, was an engineer, researcher, and manager at the University of Michigan, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, University of California (UC), Berkeley, and the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory prior to becoming president of Battel Engineering. At UC Berkeley, Mr. Battel was project manager for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) project. Since 1990 his company, Battel Engineering, has provided engineering, development, and review services to NASA, DOD, university, and industrial clients. Areas of specialization include program management, systems engineering, advanced technology, UV optics, RF communications, spacecraft avionics, power systems, high-voltage systems, precision electronics, and scientific instrument design. Mr. Battel was a member of the HST External Readiness Review Team for SM-2, SM3A, and SM3B; the AXAF/Chandra Independent Assessment Team, the TDRS-H/I/J Independent Review



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Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope: Final Report G Biographical Information for Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS LOUIS J. LANZEROTTI (Chair) currently consults for Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, and is a distinguished professor of solar-terrestrial research at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Dr. Lanzerotti’s principal research interests have included space plasmas, geophysics, and engineering problems related to the impact of space processes on space and terrestrial technologies. He was chair (1984-1988) of NASA’s Space and Earth Science Advisory Committee and a member of the 1990 Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program. He has also served as chair (1988-1994) of the Space Studies Board and as a member (1991-1993) of the Vice President’s Space Policy Advisory Board. In 2004 he was nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate for a 6-year term on the National Science Board. He has served on numerous NASA, National Science Foundation, and university advisory bodies concerned with space and geophysics research. He is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Geophysical Union, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has an extensive history of NRC service. STEVEN J. BATTEL, a private consultant, was an engineer, researcher, and manager at the University of Michigan, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, University of California (UC), Berkeley, and the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory prior to becoming president of Battel Engineering. At UC Berkeley, Mr. Battel was project manager for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) project. Since 1990 his company, Battel Engineering, has provided engineering, development, and review services to NASA, DOD, university, and industrial clients. Areas of specialization include program management, systems engineering, advanced technology, UV optics, RF communications, spacecraft avionics, power systems, high-voltage systems, precision electronics, and scientific instrument design. Mr. Battel was a member of the HST External Readiness Review Team for SM-2, SM3A, and SM3B; the AXAF/Chandra Independent Assessment Team, the TDRS-H/I/J Independent Review

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Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope: Final Report Team, and the Mars Polar Lander Failure Review Board. He is also a member of the NSO Solar Observatory Council. CHARLES F. BOLDEN, JR., a retired U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) major general, is a senior vice president at TechTrans International, Inc. Selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in 1980, Mr. Bolden qualified as a space shuttle pilot astronaut in 1981 and subsequently flew four missions in space. As pilot of the Space Shuttle Discovery in 1990, Mr. Bolden and crew successfully deployed the Hubble Space Telescope. On his third mission in 1992, he commanded the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the first Space Laboratory mission dedicated to NASA’s Mission to Planet Earth. Immediately following this mission, Mr. Bolden was appointed assistant deputy administrator for NASA. He held this post until assigned as commander of STS-60 in 1994, the first joint U.S./Russian space shuttle mission. Upon completion of this fourth mission, Major General Bolden left the space program and returned to operational assignment in the USMC as the deputy commandant of midshipmen at the Naval Academy. He served in a number of Marine Corps and joint service assignments before retiring from the Marine Corps as the Commanding General of the Third Marine Aircraft Wing, MCAS Miramar, San Diego, California, having served more than 34 years. Bolden served on the NRC Committee on the Navy’s Needs in Space for Providing Future Capabilities (2003-2004). RODNEY A. BROOKS is director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is the Fujitsu Professor of Computer Science. He is also chief technical officer of iRobot Corp. His research is concerned both with the engineering of intelligent robots to operate in unstructured environments, and with understanding human intelligence through building humanoid robots. Dr. Brooks is a founding fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He won the Computers and Thought Award at the 1991 International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. He was co-founding editor of the International Journal of Computer Vision and is a member of the editorial boards of various journals, including Adaptive Behavior, Artificial Life, Applied Artificial Intelligence, Autonomous Robots, and New Generation Computing. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering. JON H. BRYSON is senior vice president at Aerospace Corporation with executive and supervisory responsibilities for a team supporting space systems. He has served as deputy director of the Air Force component of the National Reconnaissance Office with management responsibilities for a unit acquiring and operating several major space programs. Mr. Bryson served as program manager for two NRO programs that deal with of all aspects of the design, development, launch, and operation of several complex spacecraft and their attendant ground stations. He was a program officer for the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force and was responsible for developing the Secretary’s policies and budget submissions for several major space programs. Mr. Bryson has experience in developing and executing plans to maximize the on-orbit lifetime of failed and/or aging spacecraft, and he has been directly or indirectly responsible for extended mission life on more than a dozen satellites and for recovering use of another dozen failed satellites. BENJAMIN BUCHBINDER has extensive experience in the development and application of risk assessment methods, in the use of quantitative methods to support management decision making related to safety and programmatic risk, and in the communication of risk assessment results and their significance to a wide range of audiences. Mr. Buchbinder served as risk assessment program manager for

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Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope: Final Report Futron Corporation (1994-1997), with responsibility for business development and project management in probabilistic risk assessment and programmatic risk management. As program manager for risk assessment at NASA headquarters’ Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (1987-1994), he led NASA’s probabilistic approach to risk assessment for human spaceflight, expendable launch vehicles, range safety, space payloads, and special facilities (wind tunnels and solid rocket processing facilities). BERT BULKIN is the emeritus director of Scientific Space Programs at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. Mr. Bulkin served as the program manager for the Hubble Space Telescope and was also in charge of its maintenance, refurbishment, logistics, and servicing. Previously, he was the director of Advanced Systems Development at ITT’s Electro-Optical Division. He has a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, and completed postgraduate work at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Santa Clara. Mr. Bulkin was a member of the External Independent Readiness Review Board for the Chandra Telescope and was a member of the Independent Review Team for the Lyman Spitzer Infra-red Telescope. He served on the NRC Committee on Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station (1998-2000). ROBERT F. DUNN is vice admiral, U.S. Navy (retired). Admiral Dunn’s naval career experience includes assignments as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Air Warfare; Commander of Naval Air Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; Commander of Naval Reserve Forces; Commander of Naval Military Personnel Command; and Commander of Naval Safety Center. He has served as an independent consultant to the aerospace industry, defense non-profit institutions, non-defense government agencies, an environmental services company, corporate boards, the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, and the U.S. Naval Institute. He is currently president of the Naval Historical Foundation and president of the National Consortium for Aviation Mobility, an alliance of small aircraft transportation laboratories. SANDRA M. FABER is a professor of astronomy at the UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, and University Professor at the University of California. Her research focuses on the formation and evolution of galaxies and the evolution of structure in the universe. She utilizes ground-based optical data obtained with the Lick 3-meter and Keck 10-meter telescopes. She was a member of the Wide-Field Camera (I) Team of HST and has used Hubble Space Telescope observations to study distant galaxies and detect black holes in nearby galaxies. Dr. Faber is also a core member of DEEP (Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe), a large-scale survey of distant, faint field galaxies using the Keck twin telescopes and the Hubble Space Telescope. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served as a member of the NRC Astronomy Survey Study (1978-1983), the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics (1992-1994), and the Committee on Physics of the Universe (2000-2001). B. JOHN GARRICK, an independent consultant, was a cofounder of PLG, Inc., an international engineering, applied science, and management consulting firm, from which he retired as president and chief executive officer in 1997. His professional interests include risk assessment in nuclear energy, space and defense, chemicals and petroleum, and transportation. A past president of the Society for Risk Analysis, Dr. Garrick is also a fellow of three professional societies and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has received numerous awards, including the Society for Risk Analysis Distinguished Achievement Award. Dr. Garrick was appointed to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste in 1994 and served for 10 years (1994-2004), 4 years as chair. On September 10, 2004, President George W. Bush appointed Dr. Garrick to the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board with the designation of chair. He has served on many National Research Council committees, including several associated with the space program. Dr. Garrick received his B.S.

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Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope: Final Report in physics from Brigham Young University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering and applied science from the University of California, Los Angeles; he is also a graduate of the Oak Ridge School of Reactor Technology. RICCARDO GIACCONI is president of Associated Universities, Inc., and a research professor at Johns Hopkins University. His research is in experimental astrophysics, specifically extragalactic astronomy and the early phases of formation of the universe. Dr. Giacconi is one of three 2002 recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics, which he received for pioneering contributions to astrophysics that have led to the discovery of cosmic x-ray sources. In 1973 he was appointed professor of astronomy at Harvard University, where he led the Einstein Observatory Program. In September 1981, Dr. Giacconi was appointed director of the new Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). STScI, managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) for NASA, is the center of scientific operations and research for the Hubble Space Telescope. He later moved to Germany to become director-general of the European Southern Observatory. In 1999, he returned to the United States to become president of Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), which operates the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Dr. Giacconi is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, and he has served on the NRC Space Studies Board (1981-1984 and 1989-1993), the Astronomy and Astrophysics Task Group (1984-1988), and the Panel on High Energy Astronomy (1979-1983). GREGORY J. HARBAUGH is currently vice president of Sun ’n Fun Fly In, Inc., and director of the Florida Air Museum. Mr. Harbaugh joined the staff at Johnson Space Center after graduation from Purdue University in 1978. While at NASA, he held engineering and technical management positions in space shuttle flight operations. Mr. Harbaugh became an astronaut in August 1988. His technical assignments included work in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, the shuttle remote manipulator system, telerobotic systems development for the space station, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission development, spacecraft communicator in Mission Control, and extravehicular activity (EVA) for the International Space Station. He was assigned as the backup EVA crew member and capsule communicator for STS-61, the first HST servicing mission. He flew four space shuttle missions (STS 39, 54, 71, 82), including the first shuttle-MIR docking mission (STS 71) and the second HST servicing mission (STS 82), and performed three spacewalks (two on HST), for a total EVA time of 18 hours and 29 minutes. From 1997 to 2001 Mr. Harbaugh served as manager of the Extravehicular Activity Project Office, with program management responsibility for all aspects of NASA’s spacewalk industry, including space suits, tools, training, tasks, and operations for the space shuttle, the International Space Station, and future planetary missions. Mr. Harbaugh left NASA in March 2001. TOMMY W. HOLLOWAY retired in 2002 as manager of the International Space Station Program Office for NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Mr. Holloway was named space station manager in April 1999 after serving as manager of the Space Shuttle program for nearly 4 years. He began his career with NASA in 1963, planning activities for Gemini and Apollo flights at what was then known as the Manned Spacecraft Center. He was a flight director in Mission Control for early space shuttle flights and became chief of the office in 1985. In 1989, he was named assistant director for the Space Shuttle program for the Mission Operations Directorate. He served as deputy manager for program integration with the Space Shuttle program and director of the Phase I program of shuttle-Mir dockings before being named Space Shuttle program manager in August 1995.

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Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope: Final Report JOHN M. KLINEBERG recently retired as president of Space Systems/Loral (SS/L), a major provider of commercial communications satellite systems and services, and vice president of Loral Space & Communications, of which SS/L is a wholly owned subsidiary. Before becoming president of SS/L in 1999, Dr. Klineberg was executive vice president for Globalstar programs, where he led the successful development, production, and deployment in orbit of the Globalstar satellite constellation for providing a new generation of telephony services. Before joining Loral in 1995, Dr. Klineberg spent 25 years with NASA, where he was director of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, director of the Lewis (now Glenn) Research Center, deputy director of the Lewis Research Center, deputy associate administrator for Aeronautics and Space Technology at NASA headquarters, and a research scientist at the Ames Research Center. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Astronautical Society and a member of the International Astronautical Federation. Dr. Klineberg is a member of the NRC Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, and he chaired the NRC 2003 study of NASA’s aeronautics technology programs. VIJAY KUMAR is a professor and deputy dean for research in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the director of the General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception Laboratory (GRASP). Dr. Kumar’s research focuses on robotics, dynamics, and control. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a senior member of the IEEE. He has served on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, and the Journal of the Franklin Institute. He serves on many robotics conference committees, including the Workshop on Cooperative Control, 2003 (organizer); the 27th ASME Biennial Mechanisms and Robotics Conference, Montreal, 2002 (conference chair); the International Conference on Robotics and Automation (program committee); the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (program committee); and Robotics: Systems and Science (area chair). He is the co-founder of Bio Software Systems, a start-up commercializing software for systems biology in Camden, N.J. FORREST S. McCARTNEY retired as vice president for Launch Operations at Lockheed Martin Astronautics Cape Canaveral Air Station, Florida, and is a retired U.S. Air Force Lt. General. McCartney was the commander of the Air Force Space Division in Los Angeles, California (1983-1986), and was previously the AFS deputy for space communications systems at the Space and Missile Systems Organization at Los Angeles, with practically all the military communications satellite programs under his purview. In 1979, Mr. McCartney transferred to Norton AFB to become the vice commander of the Ballistic Missile Office. He became the commander of the Ballistic Missile Office and director of the M-X program in 1980. In 1982, he was appointed vice commander of Air Force Systems Command’s Space Division. In the wake of the Challenger accident, Mr. McCartney was appointed director of the Kennedy Space Center on loan from the Air Force. He retired from the Air Force in August 1987 but continued to serve as the director of the Kennedy Space Center for another 4 years. STEPHEN M. ROCK is a professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the director of the Aerospace Robotics Laboratory at Stanford University. He also holds an adjunct position at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. Dr. Rock’s interests include the development and experimental verification of advanced control techniques for robotic and autonomous vehicle systems. Areas of emphasis include planning and navigation, GPS and vision-based control, and precision robotic manipulator control. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Dr. Rock led the Controls and Instrumentation Department of Systems Control Technology, Inc. Dr. Rock served on the NRC Panel on Vehicle

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Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope: Final Report Applications (1984-1986), the Committee on the Use of the International Space Station for Engineering Research and Technology Development (1995-1996), and the Committee on Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station (1998-2000). JOSEPH H. ROTHENBERG is currently president and a member of the board of directors of Universal Space Network. Mr. Rothenberg, who joined NASA in 1983, was named associate administrator for space flight in January 1998 and was in charge of NASA’s human exploration and development of space. Before coming to NASA headquarters, he served as director of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. As associate administrator, Mr. Rothenberg was responsible for establishing policies and direction for the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs, as well as for space communications and expendable launch services. Rothenberg joined Goddard in 1983 and was responsible for space systems development and operations, and for execution of the scientific research program for the NASA Earth-orbiting science missions. He is widely recognized for leading the development and successful completion of the first servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope, which corrected the telescope’s flawed optics. From 1981 to 1983, he served as executive vice president of Computer Technology Associates, Inc., Space Systems Division, where he managed all ground test and operations systems-engineering projects. Those projects included the Hubble Space Telescope, the Solar Maximum repair mission, and space tracking and data system architecture projects. JOSEPH H. TAYLOR, JR., is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Physics and former dean of the faculty at Princeton University. He is a radio astronomer and physicist who, with Russell A. Hulse, was the co-recipient of the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physics for their joint discovery of the first binary pulsar. He has won several other awards, including the Wolf prize in Physics, The National Academy of Sciences Henry Draper medal, the American Astronomical Society’s Dannie Heineman prize, and the Magellanic Premium of the American Philosophical Society, and he was the Albert Einstein Society’s Einstein Prize Laureate. Taylor is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, and he has served as co-chair of the NRC Task Group on Gravity Probe B (1994-1995) and as a member of the Committee on Space Astronomy and Astrophysics (1981-1982) and the Committee on Radio Frequencies (1980-1986). He also served as co-chair of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee (1998-2000) and currently serves on the Board on Physics and Astronomy. ROGER E. TETRAULT is the retired CEO and chair of the board of McDermott International Corp. McDermott was an S&P 500 corporation engaged in the construction of electric power generation facilities, the construction of offshore oil and gas platforms and the laying of pipelines. Additionally, it was the sole supplier of nuclear reactors to the Navy and was the prime contractor at a number of DOE national facilities. Previously, he was a senior vice president of General Dynamics Corp. (GD). During his tenure with GD, he was president of Electric Boat, the shipyard that manufactured nuclear powered submarines. He was also the president of the Land Systems Division, which made armored vehicles, including the Abrams tank. He is a member of the NASA Advisory Council and served as a member on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. RICHARD H. TRULY is the director of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Truly began his career as a naval aviator and retired as a vice admiral in 1989. He was among the first military astronauts selected in 1965 for the USAF Manned Orbiting Laboratory program in Los Angeles, California. He became a NASA astronaut in 1969 and was a member of the astronaut support crew and capsule communicator for all three of the manned Skylab missions (1973) and the Apollo-Soyuz

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Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope: Final Report mission (1975). In 1977, he piloted the Shuttle Enterprise during the Approach and Landing Test program. In 1981, Truly served as the pilot of STS-2, which was the first re-flight of the newly designed space shuttle. In 1983, Truly commanded STS-8, the first nighttime shuttle launch and landing. He has spent over 200 hours in space on two spaceflights. Truly left NASA in 1983 to become the first commander of the Naval Space Command, Dahlgren, Virginia. He returned to NASA and from 1986 to 1989 served as NASA associate administrator for space flight. From 1989 to 1992, he served as NASA administrator. He subsequently served as vice president of the Georgia Institute of Technology and as director of the Georgia Tech Research Institute. Truly is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on the NRC Naval Studies Board (1992-1994). STAFF SANDRA J. GRAHAM received her Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Duke University in 1990. Her past research focused primarily on topics in bioinorganic chemistry, such as the exchange mechanisms and reaction chemistry of biological metal complexes and their analogs. From 1990 to 1994 she held the position of senior scientist at the Bionetics Corporation, where she worked in the science branch of the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA headquarters. Since 1994 Dr. Graham has been a senior program officer at the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council, where she has directed numerous studies, primarily in the areas of space life sciences and microgravity sciences. MAUREEN MELLODY served as a program officer at the National Academies from 2002 to 2004, managing policy studies related to aeronautics and space. Previously, she served as the 2001-2002 American Institute of Physics congressional science fellow in the office of Congressman Howard L. Berman (D-CA), working on issues related to intellectual property. Dr. Mellody received a B.S. degree in physics from Virginia Tech in 1995, an M.S. in applied physics from the University of Michigan in 1997, and a Ph.D. in applied physics from the University of Michigan in 2000. She was a postdoctoral research scientist at the University of Michigan in 2001. Her research specialties include acoustics and auditory signal processing. CELESTE NAYLOR joined the NRC and the Space Studies Board in June 2002 as a senior project assistant. She works primarily with the Committee on Assessment of Options to Extend the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope and has also worked with the Committee on Microgravity Research and the Task Group on Research on the International Space Station. Ms. Naylor is a member of the Society of Government Meeting Professionals and has more than 6 years of experience in event management. AMANDA SHARP, SSB summer undergraduate intern, is a rising senior at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in physics, but her courses have included significant work in astronomy and math. Her undergraduate research work has included modeling of the atmospheric profiles of extrasolar giant planets and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. CATHERINE A. GRUBER is an assistant editor with the Space Studies Board (SSB). She joined SSB as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber first came to the NRC in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, then as an outreach assistant for the National Academy of Sciences-Smithsonian Institution’s National Science Resources Center. She was also a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a bachelor of arts in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland.

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