B
Statement of Task

This study will examine the current state of knowledge regarding the direct and indirect radiative forcing effects of gases, aerosols, land-use, and solar variability on the climate of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere and it will identify research needed to improve our understanding of these effects. Specifically, this study will:

  1. Summarize what is known about the direct and indirect radiative effects caused by individual forcing agents, including the spatial and temporal scales over which specific forcing agents may be important;

  2. Evaluate techniques (e.g., modeling, laboratory, observations, and field experiments) used to estimate direct and indirect radiative effects of specific forcing agents;

  3. Identify key gaps in the understanding of radiative forcing effects on climate;

  4. Identify key uncertainties in projections of future radiative forcing effects on climate;

  5. Recommend near- and longer-term research priorities for improving our understanding and projections of radiative forcing effects on climate.



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Radiative Forcing of Climate Change: Expanding the Concept and Addressing Uncertainties B Statement of Task This study will examine the current state of knowledge regarding the direct and indirect radiative forcing effects of gases, aerosols, land-use, and solar variability on the climate of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere and it will identify research needed to improve our understanding of these effects. Specifically, this study will: Summarize what is known about the direct and indirect radiative effects caused by individual forcing agents, including the spatial and temporal scales over which specific forcing agents may be important; Evaluate techniques (e.g., modeling, laboratory, observations, and field experiments) used to estimate direct and indirect radiative effects of specific forcing agents; Identify key gaps in the understanding of radiative forcing effects on climate; Identify key uncertainties in projections of future radiative forcing effects on climate; Recommend near- and longer-term research priorities for improving our understanding and projections of radiative forcing effects on climate.