Appendix F
Panel Members, Staff, and Contributors

PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF

GARRY BREWER (Chair) is the Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser professor of resource policy and management at Yale University. In the field of policy science, his expertise involves environmental management. He was first appointed to the faculty of the School of Management in 1974. In 1980 he joined the faculty of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and became the first Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser chair (1984 to 1990). He also occupied the Edwin W. Davis Chair from 1990 to 1991. Brewer has served as dean and professor of the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources & Environment, professor at the Michigan Business School, and as dean and member of the faculty at the University of California at Berkeley. He has served on and chaired numerous national and international panels and commissions, including those of the National Research Council (NRC), the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Sweden’s National Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research. A graduate of the University California at Berkeley, he has an M.S. in public administration from San Diego State University and M.Phil. (1968) and Ph.D. (1970) degrees from Yale in political science.

BRADEN R. ALLENBY is professor of civil and environmental engineering, and of law, at Arizona State University, as well as a Batten fellow in residence at the University of Virginia’s Darden Graduate School of Busi-



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Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities Appendix F Panel Members, Staff, and Contributors PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF GARRY BREWER (Chair) is the Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser professor of resource policy and management at Yale University. In the field of policy science, his expertise involves environmental management. He was first appointed to the faculty of the School of Management in 1974. In 1980 he joined the faculty of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and became the first Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser chair (1984 to 1990). He also occupied the Edwin W. Davis Chair from 1990 to 1991. Brewer has served as dean and professor of the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources & Environment, professor at the Michigan Business School, and as dean and member of the faculty at the University of California at Berkeley. He has served on and chaired numerous national and international panels and commissions, including those of the National Research Council (NRC), the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Sweden’s National Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research. A graduate of the University California at Berkeley, he has an M.S. in public administration from San Diego State University and M.Phil. (1968) and Ph.D. (1970) degrees from Yale in political science. BRADEN R. ALLENBY is professor of civil and environmental engineering, and of law, at Arizona State University, as well as a Batten fellow in residence at the University of Virginia’s Darden Graduate School of Busi-

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Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities ness Administration. Previously he was the environment, health and safety vice president of AT&T and served as director for energy and environmental systems at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He is a member of the Virginia Bar and has worked as an attorney for the Civil Aeronautics Board and the Federal Communications Commission; he has also worked as a strategic consultant on economic and technical telecommunications issues. His publications include Design for Environment (1997), Industrial Ecology (2003), and Industrial Ecology: Policy Framework and Implementation (1999). He writes a column for the Green Business Letter and is coeditor of The Greening of Industrial Ecosystems (1994) and Environmental Threats and National Security (1994). He has taught courses at the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Princeton Theological Seminary, Columbia University, and the University of Virginia School of Engineering. A cum laude graduate of Yale University in 1972, Allenby received his Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia Law School in 1978 and his master’s in economics from the University of Virginia in 1979. He received his master’s in environmental sciences from Rutgers University in 1989 and his Ph.D. in environmental sciences from Rutgers in 1992. RICHARD ANDREWS is the Thomas Willis Lambeth distinguished professor of public policy at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, with appointments in the Departments of Public Policy, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, and City and Regional Planning, the Carolina Environmental Program, and the Curriculum in Ecology. His research and teaching focus on environmental policy in the United States and worldwide; he is the author of Managing the Environment, Managing Ourselves (1999) and Environmental Policy and Administrative Change (1976); he has conducted research projects on environmental policy innovations in the United States, the Czech Republic, and Thailand. His recent research addresses the effects of public policies as incentives for environmental decisions by businesses, particularly “voluntary” approaches such as self-regulation by corporate and business customer mandates for introduction and third-party auditing of environmental management systems. He has chaired or served on study committees for the NRC, the Science Advisory Board of the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Academy of Public Administration, and the Office of Technology Assessment. Before joining the Carolina faculty in 1981, he taught at the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and was a Peace Corps volunteer in Nepal. He has an undergraduate degree from Yale University and a Ph.D. and a professional master’s degree from the University of North Carolina’s Department of City and Regional Planning.

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Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities SUSAN CUTTER is a Carolina distinguished professor of geography at the University of South Carolina. She is also the director of the Hazards Research Lab, a research and training center that integrates geographical information processing techniques with hazards analysis and management. She is the cofounding editor of an interdisciplinary journal, Environmental Hazards. She has been working in the risk and hazards fields for more than 25 years and has authored or edited numerous books and peer-reviewed articles. She coauthored The Geographical Dimensions of Terrorism (2003) and Exploitation, Conservation, Preservation: A Geographic Perspective on Natural Resource Use (2003). She also authored American Hazardscapes: The Regionalization of Hazards and Disasters (2001), which chronicles the increasing hazard vulnerability to natural disaster events in the United States during the past 30 years. She was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and served as president of the Association of American Geographers in 1999-2000. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1976. J. CLARENCE DAVIES is a senior fellow in the Risk, Resource, and Environmental Management division at Resources for the Future. Previously he was the assistant administrator for policy, planning and evaluation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In that position, he had responsibility for oversight of all agency policies and programs, as well as the regulatory process. Davies was coauthor of the original plan that created EPA and has long served as an adviser to the agency. He also served with the Council on Environmental Quality and the Bureau of the Budget (now the Office of Management and Budget). He has been executive vice president of the Conservation Foundation, where he specialized in matters concerning toxics, risk assessment, and the control and integrated management of pollution, and has served as a senior staff member at the Council on Environmental Quality. He chaired the NRC’s Committee on Principles of Decision Making for Regulating Chemicals in the Environment. He has been on the faculty of Princeton University and Bowdoin College. He is the author of The Politics of Pollution and Neighborhood Groups and Urban Renewal and the coauthor or coeditor of numerous other books, articles, and monographs dealing with environmental issues. Davies has a B.A. in American government from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in American government from Columbia University. LOREN LUTZENHISER is professor of urban studies and planning at Portland State University, where he also serves as director of the urban studies Ph.D. program. His teaching interests include environmental policy and practice, particularly in terms of energy infrastructures and technological change, urban environmental sustainability, and the built environment.

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Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities His research focuses on the environmental impacts of sociotechnical systems, particularly how urban energy/resource use is linked to global environmental change. Recent studies have considered variations across households in energy consumption practices, how energy-using goods are procured by government agencies, how commercial real estate markets work to develop both poorly performing and environmentally exceptional buildings, and how the “greening” of business may (or may not) be influenced by local sustainability movements and business actors. He is currently completing a major study for the State of California on the behavior of households, businesses and governments in the aftermath of that state’s 2001 energy deregulation crisis. Lutzenhiser has published widely in social science, policy, and applied journals. Prior to entering academia, he worked as a local antipoverty program director and regional social program planner. He is a member of the editorial board of Social Problems and the past chair of the American Sociological Association’s section on environment and technology. He has B.A. and M.A. degrees in sociology from the University of Montana and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Davis. BONNIE McCAY is a Board of Governors distinguished service professor of anthropology and ecology at Cook College, Rutgers State University. She has been with the university since 1974. In that time she has served in many roles, including director of the Center for Environmental Indicators and chair of the Department of Human Ecology. Her research and publications focus on the social implications of fishery management, user group participation in regulatory processes, the culture of fishing communities, fishery comanagement, and the socioeconomic consequences of various property rights regimes in fishery resources. She received the Norwegian Marshall Fund Award for Research in Marine Conservation and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is author, coauthor, or editor for numerous books, the most recent being Enclosing the Commons: Individual Transferable Quotas in a Nova Scotia Industry (2002). She was a member of the Ocean Studies Board of the NRC and is a national associate of the NRC, having served on several other NRC committees. She is vice-chair of the Federal Advisory Committee on Marine Protected Areas and serves on the Panel on Development of Wind Turbine Facilities in Coastal Waters for the State of New Jersey. She has a B.A. from Portland State University and M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees, the latter in anthropology, from Columbia University. TIMOTHY McDANIELS is a professor at the University of British Columbia, where he teaches in two graduate programs: the School of Community and Regional Planning and the Institute for Resources, Environment and

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Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities Sustainability. He is the interim director of the institute and also directs the eco-risk research unit at the university. He is a specialist in decision analysis, value elicitation, policy analysis, and the social dimensions of risk management questions. He enjoys working on ecological, technology, and human health risk issues. He has a special interest in the underlying concepts, design and implementation of stakeholder-based, structured decision processes for risk management questions. He is also an adjunct professor in engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University, where he is a coinvestigator in the new Climate Decision Making Center. He has served as a member of national peer review and advisory committees for the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and Health Canada. He is the decision sciences editor for Risk Analysis, and has served as editor for Risk, Decision and Policy. He is a fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis and has won the society’s distinguished service award. He is coeditor of Risk Analysis and Society: An Interdisciplinary Characterization of the Field (2003). He received his B.A. in economics in 1970 from the University of Minnesota, an M.A. in economics in 1974 from Simon Fraser University, and Ph.D. in decision sciences and policy analysis in 1989 from Carnegie Mellon University. JENNIFER NASH is director of the Regulatory Policy Program at the Center for Business and Government, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. She conducts empirical research on emerging trends in government regulation and industry self-regulation; current research explores the effectiveness of performance- and management-based regulation in achieving policy goals and the role of voluntary programs in improving the environmental performance of firms. She is coeditor of Regulating From the Inside: Can Environmental Management Systems Achieve Policy Goals? (2001) and the forthcoming Leveraging the Private Sector: Management-Based Strategies for Improving Environmental Performance. Before coming to the Kennedy School, she served as associate director and acting director of the Technology, Business, and Environment Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as a planner for the Massachusetts Division of Capital Planning and Operations, and as executive director of the Delaware Valley Citizen’s Council for Clean Air. She has a master of city planning degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1988). STEVEN W. PERCY, adjunct lecturer of corporate strategy and international business at the University of Michigan Business School, is the former chair and chief executive officer of BP America, Inc., which was BP’s U.S. subsidiary prior to its merger with Amoco Corporation. Prior to assuming those duties, he was president of BP Oil in the United States. Since retiring from BP, he has served as the head of Phillips Petroleum’s Refining, Market-

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Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities ing and Transportation Company. He has been a senior planning analyst with Babcock & Wilcox and in several managerial positions with Standard Oil before its merger with BP. He is a member of the board of directors of Omnova Solutions Inc., Wavefront Energy and Environmental Services, Inc., and Resources for the Future. He served as a member of President Clinton’s Council on Sustainable Development in the role of cochair of its climate change task force. He has chaired Cleveland State University’s Foundation, held the position of vice chair of the Greater Cleveland Growth Association and chair of its Finance Committee, and chair of Neighborhood Progress, Inc. Percy has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, an M.B.A. from the University of Michigan, and a J.D. degree from Cleveland Marshall College of Law. He is a member of the Ohio State Bar. DAVID SKOLE is a professor and director of the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, a research program focused on environmental research using remote sensing systems at Michigan State University. His research interests focus on the role humans play in changing land cover throughout the world. He uses satellite data to measure the patterns of landscape change at regional and global scales and employs field research to uncover the fundamental processes of change. He is also developing analyses and models of the carbon cycle and biodiversity. Currently he is involved in research projects focused on understanding the interannual variation in deforestation rates, as well as the social and ecological controls on its variation over time. He is a principal investigator on several funded research projects, including the Tropical Rain Forest Information Center, the Large Scale Amazon Basin Experiment, the Landsat 7 Science Team, the Canadian Radarsat program, and the Japanese JERS program. He has served on several committees of the National Aeronautical and Space Administration and panels for the Earth Observing System and its data system and other programs. He is currently the high resolution design team leader for the United Nations project on Global Observations of Forest Cover of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites. He has an M.S. in environmental science from Indiana University and a Ph.D. in natural resources from the University of New Hampshire. PAUL C. STERN (Study Director) is also study director of two NRC committees: the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change and the Committee on Assessing Behavioral and Social Science Research on Aging. His research interests include the determinants of environmentally significant behavior, particularly at the individual level, participatory processes for informing environmental decision making, and the governance of environmental resources and risks. He is the coauthor or coeditor of Envi-

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Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities ronmental Problems and Human Behavior (2002), The Drama of the Commons (2002), and New Tools for Environmental Protection: Education, Information, and Voluntary Measures (2002). Stern is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. He has a B.A. from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University. CONTRIBUTORS WILLIAM ASCHER is the Donald C. McKenna professor of government and economics at Claremont McKenna College, where he also serves as vice president and dean of the faculty. His work on decision making and environmental/natural resource issues includes Forecasting: An Appraisal for Policymakers and Planners; Strategic Planning and Forecasting; Natural Resource Policymaking in Developing Countries; and Why Governments Waste Natural Resources. He currently serves on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Scientific Advisory Board Committee on Valuing the Protection of Ecological Systems and Services. LORI SNYDER BENNEAR is assistant professor of environmental economics and policy at the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke University. Her research focuses on estimating the effect of different regulatory innovations on measures of facility-level environmental performance, such as pollution levels, chemical use, and technology choice. Her recent work has focused on measuring the effectiveness of management-based regulations, which require each regulated entity to develop its own internal rules and initiates to achieve reductions in pollution, as well as the effectiveness of regulations that mandate public reporting of toxic emissions. CARY COGLIANESE is visiting professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and associate professor of public policy and chair of the Regulatory Policy Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. His interdisciplinary research focuses on regulatory policy and administrative law, with a particular emphasis on the empirical evaluation of alternative and innovative regulatory strategies. His recent work has focused on the application of management-based and performance-based regulation to health, safety, and environmental problems; the role of science, economics, and information in the regulatory process; and the effects of consensus-building on regulatory policy making.

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Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities ROBIN GREGORY is senior researcher with Decision Research in Vancouver, British Columbia (head office: Eugene, Oregon). His research and applied consulting is focused on topics related to facilitating meaningful stakeholder participation as part of environmental policy deliberations, encouraging learning and adaptive resource management, using decision-aiding techniques to evaluate nonmarket benefits and costs, and understanding processes of preference construction and elicitation. ANDREW J. HOFFMAN is the Holcim professor of sustainable enterprise at the University of Michigan, a position with joint appointments at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business and the School of Natural Resources and Environment. In this role, he also serves as the faculty codirector of Michigan’s dual degree (MS/MBA) Corporate Environmental Management Program. His research focuses on the cultural and institutional aspects of corporate environmental and sustainability strategies. He is the author or editor of four books and has been the recipient of the Rachel Carson Prize (from the Society for Social Studies of Science) and the Rising Star Award (from the World Resources Institute/Aspen Institute). REBECCA J. ROMSDAHL worked with the committee through the National Academies graduate fellowship program. She is a doctoral candidate in environmental science and public policy at George Mason University. Her dissertation work examines the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 and the challenges it presents for deliberative public participation in natural resource management decisions.

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