E
Biographical Information for Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Hung-Lung Allen Huang (Chair) is senior scientist at the Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Huang is a member of the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies and the principal investigator for the International MODIS/AIRS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer/ Atmospheric Infrared Radiation Sounder) Processing Package. He has more than 20 years of comprehensive experience in meteorological satellite data processing and applications, including 17 years of experience in remote sensing, geostationary and polar-orbiting meteorological satellite data applications, atmospheric radiation, meteorological profile retrieval, satellite instrument design performance analysis, information content analysis, and the use of high spectral resolution interferometer and microwave data. His experience also includes computer software development and maintenance for a real-time satellite image processing system.

Philip E. Ardanuy is director, Remote Sensing Applications, at Raytheon Information Solutions. A meteorology graduate of Florida State University, Dr. Ardanuy has 25 years of professional experience participating in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) remote sensing programs. He specializes in developing integrated mission systems leveraging the synergies of user requirements, science and sensor maturity, and data systems through government/industry/



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Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond E Biographical Information for Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Hung-Lung Allen Huang (Chair) is senior scientist at the Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Huang is a member of the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies and the principal investigator for the International MODIS/AIRS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer/ Atmospheric Infrared Radiation Sounder) Processing Package. He has more than 20 years of comprehensive experience in meteorological satellite data processing and applications, including 17 years of experience in remote sensing, geostationary and polar-orbiting meteorological satellite data applications, atmospheric radiation, meteorological profile retrieval, satellite instrument design performance analysis, information content analysis, and the use of high spectral resolution interferometer and microwave data. His experience also includes computer software development and maintenance for a real-time satellite image processing system. Philip E. Ardanuy is director, Remote Sensing Applications, at Raytheon Information Solutions. A meteorology graduate of Florida State University, Dr. Ardanuy has 25 years of professional experience participating in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) remote sensing programs. He specializes in developing integrated mission systems leveraging the synergies of user requirements, science and sensor maturity, and data systems through government/industry/

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Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond academic partnerships. Dr. Ardanuy’s research and development career extends across tropical meteorology, Earth’s radiation budget and energy balance, satellite instrument calibration and characterization, research to operational science data systems, environmental observations validation, chief scientist for National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Visible and Infrared Imager/ Radiometer Suite, and the upcoming Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R mission. John R. Christy is professor of atmospheric science and director of the Earth System Science Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Dr. Christy began studying global climate issues in 1987. In November 2000, Governor Don Siegelman appointed him as the Alabama state climatologist. Dr. Christy has served as a contributor and lead author for the United Nations reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, in which satellite temperatures were included as a high-quality data set for studying global climate change. In addition, he has been a member of several committees of the National Research Council (NRC), including the Committee on Earth Studies (1998-2001) and the Committee to Review NASA’s ESE [Earth Sciences Enterprise] Science Plan. Dr. Christy is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society. James Frew is assistant professor in the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). He is an adviser to NASA’s New Data and Information Systems and Services) activity. Dr. Frew is a principal investigator in UCSB’s Institute for Computational Earth System Science (ICESS). As part of his doctoral research, he developed the Image Processing Workbench, an open-source set of software tools for remote sensing image processing currently used for instruction and research at UCSB and elsewhere. He has served as both the manager and the acting director of the Computer Systems Laboratory (ICESS’s predecessor) and as the associate director of the Sequoia 2000 Project, a 3-year, $14 million, multicampus consortium formed to investigate large-scale data management aspects of global change problems. Dr. Frew currently leads the Earth System Science Workbench project, part of NASA’s Federation of Earth Science Information Partners. Susan B. Fruchter is associate director for operations at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Prior to holding this position, Ms. Fruchter was extensively engaged at NOAA in satellite issues ranging from technology to policy: from 1994 to 2001, she was counselor to the Undersecretary of Commerce and was director of NOAA’s Office of Policy and Strategic Planning in the Department of Commerce. She was responsible for leading the strategic planning efforts

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Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond and process within NOAA and for coordination on a range of NOAA policy and interagency issues. Ms. Fruchter was also executive secretary for the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources of the National Science and Technology Council. Before serving at NOAA, she was director of administration and resources management at NASA’s Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology. Aris Georgakakos is a professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is also the school’s associate chair for research, head of the Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Water Resources Program, and director of the Georgia Water Resources Institute. Dr. Georgakakos’s areas of research include remote sensing of hydrologic variables, flood and drought management, hydropower scheduling, agricultural planning, regional groundwater management, and decision support systems for river basin planning, management, and conflict resolution. Ying-Hwa (Bill) Kuo is senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He is also director of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate, a joint U.S.-Taiwan project using radio occultation (limb sounding) from space, and the head of Mesoscale Prediction Group/MMM Division. Dr. Kuo is a recognized leader in the field of mesoscale numerical modeling and data assimilation for weather forecasting. His scientific interests include mesoscale modeling, explosive marine cyclogenesis, mesoscale convective systems, heavy rainfall prediction, data assimilation, Global Positioning System/MET research, and model initialization. He served as the U.S. project director for the Taiwan Area Mesoscale Experiment. Dr. Kuo has been co-chief editor of Monthly Weather Review since 1998 and associate editor of Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences since January 1999. David S. Linden is a private consultant at DSL Consulting and Massively Parallel Systems, Inc. Dr. Linden provides geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing consulting services for corporate and government clients. He received a PhD in remote sensing/forestry from Colorado State University in 1995. He is a member of the GIS World Editorial Advisory Board, the American Society for Photo-grammetry and Remote Sensing, the Society of American Foresters, and the International Society of Tropical Foresters. Kevin Price is associate director of the Kansas Applied Remote Sensing Program, Kansas Biological Survey, University of Kansas, and an associate professor in the Department of Geography. Dr. Price is an ecologist and a geographer specializing in satellite remotely sensed imagery for studying Earth systems. His research focus is on

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Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond land cover and use characterization and on Earth system studies using observations made from satellite remote sensing instruments. He is co-principal investigator for the Kansas Gap Analysis Program. His current research is on the grassland steppe of Inner Mongolia. He has ongoing research and educational activities in the U.S. Great Plains, Central Asia, Mexico, Central America, and South Central Africa. He serves on the NRC Committee for Agenda 21 and is helping draft recommendations to the U.S. State Department relative to sustainable development in Africa. Steven W. Running is director of the Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group, University of Montana. Professor Running’s research focuses on terrestrial biogeochemical cycling and on integrating remote sensing, bioclimatology, and ecosystem modeling at multiple scales. His team currently produces a regular weekly data set of photosynthetic activity of the terrestrial biosphere. Dr. Running has served on numerous national and international committees, including the Scientific Committee of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program; NASA Earth Observing System, Land Science Panel, chair, 1994-1998; the Terrestrial Observation Panel for Climate of the World Climate Research Program, World Meteorological Organization, 1995-1998; the NRC’s BASC Climate Research Committee, 1996-1999; the SSB Committee to Review NASA’s ESE Science Plan; and the NRC Committee on Earth Studies, 2004-2006. He is a lead author for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report. He was elected a fellow of the American Geophysical Union in 2002. Marijean T. Seelbach recently became vice president and deputy, business development, for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. Prior to this she was president and chief executive officer of QuakeFinder, LLC. Before holding that position, Dr. Seelbach was vice president of In-Q-Tel. From 1997 to 1999, she was senior vice president of engineering at SRI International, where she was responsible for major business segments that worked for such clients as the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Air Force. From 1989 to 1991, Dr. Seelbach was a professional member on the budget subcommittee of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the U.S. Congress and was responsible for making budget recommendations for space-related programs. Thomas H. Vonder Haar is University Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University (CSU) and director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere. His research interests lie in the areas of global energy budget, remote sensing from satellites, local-area forecasting, and biogeoscience. His present research activities include work on Earth’s radiation budget and fundamental relationships with the climate system. His work has included some of the first

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Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond results of the direct solar irradiance measurements from satellites and the exchange of energy between Earth and space. His studies on the interaction of clouds and radiation and the general circulation have formed a basis for national and international plans leading to the Global Energy and Water Experiment and programs related to global change. Dr. Vonder Haar developed and directs CSU’s Satellite Earthstation to support research on storms at all scales. In February 2003, Dr. Vonder Haar was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Robert A. Weller is a senior scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Dr. Weller holds the Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Chair in Oceanography and is director of the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Ocean Research. His research interests include wind-forced motion in the upper ocean, mixed-layer dynamics, upper-ocean velocity structure studies, air-sea interaction, the role of the ocean in climate, and the development of upper-ocean and surface meteorological instrumentation and platforms for air/sea experiments. He is fellow and past president of the Ocean Sciences Section of the American Geophysical Union, and a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Meteorological Society, and the Oceanographic Society. Dr. Weller served on the NRC’s Committee Toward a National Collaboratory: Establishing the User-Developer Partnership and on its Committee on Radio Frequencies. STAFF Assistants to the Chair Brian Osborne (through July 2003) received an MS from the University of Waikato, New Zealand, in 1995. His research topic was The Retrieval of Sea Surface Temperature from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer). Following enrollment as a PhD student at Curtin University of Technology, Western Australia, he spent 18 months as an honorary fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Space Science and Engineering Center. He subsequently served there as an assistant researcher until returning to New Zealand in 2003. Rosalyn A. Pertzborn (from August 2003) is director for the Office of Space Science Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC). She has collaborated successfully with scientists at the SSEC and the Departments of Physics, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Geology, and Astronomy to design, implement, and evaluate education and public outreach (E/PO) programs. From 2001 though 2003, she was a program planning specialist at the Office of Space Science (OSS) at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. She also

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Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond served as lead on the TMCO (Technical, Management, Cost and Other) E/PO panel to support review and analysis of findings for mission concept study feasibility. She served as co-chair for the OSS/Education Division Working Group and principal liaison between OSS and the NASA Education Division. Ms. Pertzborn currently serves as co-chair for the June 2004 U.S./India Conference on Space Science, Applications and Commerce; co-convener for the April 2004 European Geoscience Union’s, Education and Outreach Session; and as the lead E/PO consultant for the NASA Headquarters Mars Program Office. National Research Council Staff Claudette K. Baylor-Fleming has worked as a senior program assistant with the NRC’s Space Studies Board since 1995, primarily as the program assistant to the director and administrative officer. She came to the NRC in 1988, first serving as senior secretary for the Institute of Medicine’s Division of Health Sciences Policy, and then working for 7 years as the administrative/financial assistant for the NRC’s Board on Global Change. In 2003, Ms. Baylor-Fleming completed two certificate programs, one at the Catholic University of America in Web technologies and the other at Trinity College of Washington in information technology applications. She is currently pursuing a BA in graphic design from American University. Richard Leshner is a research associate for the Space Studies Board and a PhD candidate in science and technology policy at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Mr. Leshner worked as a space systems engineer focusing on the integration of power, heating, and propulsion systems before coming to the National Research Council. In addition to a general interest in space policy, Mr. Leshner’s research interests include the history and progress of satellite programs in the Earth sciences, international cooperation in space, export control policy and the politics of defense trade controls, the theory and practice of technology transfer, and the role of interest groups in the policy-making process. Robert L. Riemer is a senior program officer with the Board on Physics and Astronomy and the Space Studies Board. Before joining the NRC in January 1985, Dr. Riemer was a senior project geophysicist for Gulf Oil Exploration and Production Company. He received a BS with honors in physics and astrophysics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a PhD with honors in physics from the University of Kansas-Lawrence. Dr. Riemer served as study director for the 1991 and 2000 decadal surveys of astronomy and has worked with many NRC committees, ranging in subject areas from various fields of physics and astronomy to mathematics and interdisciplinary research.