F
Biographies of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Peter B. Moore, Chair, is Sterling Professor of Chemistry at Yale University, where he is also a faculty member in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry. He received his Ph.D. in Biophysics from Harvard University in 1966. He joined the Yale faculty in 1969 following postdoctoral fellowships at the Institute de Biologie Moleculaire, Geneva, Switzerland, and at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, U.K.. The focus of Dr. Moore’s research is the delineation of the relationship between structure and function in RNAs and ribonucleoproteins. He is best known for his work on the ribosome, the enzyme that catalyzes mRNA-directed protein synthesis, and prominent among the experimental techniques he has used are neutron scattering, NMR, and x-ray crystallography. He has been a member of numerous editorial boards and advisory committees, having recently completed a 5-year term as the editor of Biophysical Journal. Dr. Moore was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1997 and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2003. He is a fellow of the AAAS and the Biophysical Society.


Gabriel Aeppli is the Quain Professor of Physics at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of University College London (UCL). He is also the director of the London Center for Nanotechnology, a joint enterprise between Imperial College London and University College London. Prior to taking up his UCL position,



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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science F Biographies of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Peter B. Moore, Chair, is Sterling Professor of Chemistry at Yale University, where he is also a faculty member in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry. He received his Ph.D. in Biophysics from Harvard University in 1966. He joined the Yale faculty in 1969 following postdoctoral fellowships at the Institute de Biologie Moleculaire, Geneva, Switzerland, and at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, U.K.. The focus of Dr. Moore’s research is the delineation of the relationship between structure and function in RNAs and ribonucleoproteins. He is best known for his work on the ribosome, the enzyme that catalyzes mRNA-directed protein synthesis, and prominent among the experimental techniques he has used are neutron scattering, NMR, and x-ray crystallography. He has been a member of numerous editorial boards and advisory committees, having recently completed a 5-year term as the editor of Biophysical Journal. Dr. Moore was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1997 and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2003. He is a fellow of the AAAS and the Biophysical Society. Gabriel Aeppli is the Quain Professor of Physics at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of University College London (UCL). He is also the director of the London Center for Nanotechnology, a joint enterprise between Imperial College London and University College London. Prior to taking up his UCL position,

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science Dr. Aeppli was a senior research scientist with the NEC Research Institute in Princeton and a former Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories. He received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1983. His research interests are in the application of neutron scattering techniques to the investigation of magnetism, superconductivity, and micro-magnetism. More recently he has turned his attention to quantum information processing and medical diagnostics, both of which exploit micro- and nano-technology. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, was a corecipient of the 2003 International Magnetism/Neel prize, and serves on numerous national and international review committees, including the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee’s Subcommittee on Pulsed Spallation Source Upgrades. Dr. Aeppli has pioneered accelerator- and reactor-based neutron scattering techniques to measure magnetic excitations in solids. He was a member of the NRC committee the wrote the decadal survey of condensed matter and materials physics and served on the Solid State Sciences Committee. Meigan Aronson is a professor of physics and associate dean for natural sciences at the University of Michigan. She is also asssociate director of the Michigan Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory, a user facility for the university research community. Dr. Aronson earned a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, in 1988. Her research is on quantum phase transitions, phase behaviors of low-density metals, and novel magnetism. Her research focuses on the exploration of magnetism in metals and the properties of the electron gas at low densities, where strong and unscreened Coulomb interactions are expected to lead to unusual types of charge and spin order, especially in very large magnetic fields. Her group uses neutron scattering as well as a variety of transport, magnetic, and thermal measurements to probe the ground state and its excitations at low temperatures, high magnetic fields (up to 60 T), and pressures as great as 200,000 atm. Dr. Aronson is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Paul M. Chaikin is the Henry DeWolf Smyth Professor of Physics at Princeton University and a faculty member at the Princeton Materials Institute. Dr. Chaikin, who received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Pennsylvania, is coauthor of Principles of Condensed Matter Physics, a definitive book on this subject. His experimental investigations in hard condensed matter (quantum electronic physics and low-temperature physics) and soft condensed matter (statistical mechanics of phase transitions, colloids, polymers, hydrodynamics) and at the interface often use physics and techniques from one subfield in the other. He is particularly interested in the effects of dimensionality, Coulomb correlation, and disorder in condensed-matter systems, spin-density-wave states and superconductivity in organic metals,

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science superconducting wire networks, colloidal physics, and sedimentation in fluidized beds. Dr. Chaikin is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a past winner of the Guggenheim Fellowship and the A.P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship. Paul D. Ellis is a laboratory fellow at Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) and chief scientist of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory’s high-field magnetic resonance facility. In 1970, he received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California at Davis, where he had also studied for his B.S. Dr. Ellis spent 23 years at the University of South Carolina as a professor of chemistry, where he was selected as the George H. Bunch, Sr., Professor of Science in 1984. In 1993 he left the university to accept the position of associate director of the Macromolecular Structure & Dynamics Directorate at PNNL. Dr. Ellis’s expertise is in three main fields: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, structural biology, and heterogeneous catalysis. Among his awards and committee memberships are these: Russell Award for Science and Engineering (1976), A.P. Sloan Foundation Fellow (1977-1979), editorial advisory board for Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry (1984), South Carolina Chemist of the Year (1985), advisory committee for the Biological Facilities Centers Program, NSF (1987-1989), editorial advisory board for Concepts in Magnetic Resonance (1989), corecipient of the South Carolina Governor’s Award for Excellence in Science (1990), World Bank Visiting Scholar in China (1991), member of various study sections at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)—General Medical Sciences (1991-1995) and NIH Reviewers Reserve (1995-1999)—and fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2003). Dr. Ellis is also a member of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada’s Major Facilities Access Committee (2004). Peter F. Green holds the B.F. Goodrich endowed professorship in materials engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is currently a professor of chemical engineering. Dr. Green is a fellow of the American Physical Society (1996) and of the American Ceramic Society (1998). He is a divisional associate editor for Physical Review Letters and serves on the editorial boards for Macromolecules and the Journal of Polymer Science: Polymer Physics. He currently serves on the external advisory committee of the Division of Math and Physical Sciences of the National Science Foundation. Additionally, Dr. Green is a member of the Council of Gordon Research Conferences and is serving as vice president for the Materials Research Society. Dr. Green received his Ph.D. degree in materials science from Cornell University in 1985. Following postdoctoral research in the Ions, Solids, and Inter-

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science actions Department at Sandia National Laboratories, he joined the staff of the Physical Properties of Polymers Division in 1986. From 1991 to 1996 he served as Department Manager of the Glass and Electronic Ceramics department before moving to the University of Texas at Austin in 1996. Dr. Green is presently vice chair of the NRC’s Solid State Sciences Committee. His research interests broadly encompass problems associated with the structure and dynamics of oxide glass melts and polymeric melts, wetting, and interfacial phenomena in soft materials. David C. Larbalestier is a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and in the Department of Physics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he holds both the L.V. Shubnikov Chair and the Grainger Chair of Superconductivity. He is also the director of the Applied Superconductivity Center, an interdisciplinary center of about 40 faculty, staff, and students. He has been active in superconductivity since his Ph.D., for which his dissertation gained the Matthey Prize of Imperial College. After 2 years in Switzerland, he returned to England in 1972 to the Superconducting Magnet Research Group of the Rutherford Laboratory, working for 4 years on the development of multifilamentary Nb3Sn conductors and magnets. This work culminated in the first filamentary Nb3Sn NMR magnet, for which he shared a 1978 industrial research award (IR-100) with an Oxford Instrument Company team. He joined the University of Wisconsin in 1976, becoming associate chairman of his department in 1981, a post held until 1991, when he became director of the Applied Superconductivity Center. Dr. Larbalestier has been exceptionally active in promoting collaborations uniting industry, national laboratories, and other university groups, asserting a leadership role in both the low-temperature and high-temperature superconducting materials communities. He has been recognized by prizes of the IEEE (1991 and 2000) and the Council for Chemical Research (2000) for his work and that of his collaborators on (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox. He has served on many review panels of the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy, was a member of the 1987 National Academy of Sciences Panel on High Temperature Superconductivity, and led the 1996 World Technology Evaluation Center Panel on Energy Applications of Superconductors, sponsored by DOE and NSF. He has published more than 250 refereed papers and given more than 200 seminars and presentations at scientific meetings. During 2000 he was Visiting Professor at the University of Geneva and Visiting EPSRC Fellow at the Imperial College of the University of London. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2003. Born a U.K. subject, Dr. Larbalestier became a U.S. citizen in 1988. J. David Litster is a professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Litster received a bachelor’s degree in engineering from McMaster University

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science in Hamilton, Ontario, and a Ph.D. in physics from MIT. He was appointed to the faculty at MIT in 1966 and became a professor of physics in 1975. Dr. Litster’s research interests have been the experimental study of phase transitions in unusual states of matter, using primarily light-scattering and high-resolution x-ray scattering. He is a former chair of the NRC’s Solid State Sciences Committee (1993–1995). From 1988 to 1991, Dr. Litster was director of the MIT Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory. For 5 years before, he was director of the MIT Center for Materials Science and Engineering. From 1979 to 1983, he headed the Division of Condensed Matter, Atomic and Plasma Physics in the MIT Department of Physics. From 1991 to 2001, Dr. Litster served as vice president and dean of research. From 1996 to 2001, he also served as dean for graduate education. Dr. Litster is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received an honorary doctorate from McMaster University in 1992 and the Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics from the American Physical Society in 1993. Joseph Minervini is division head for technology and engineering in the Plasma Science and Fusion Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also holds an academic appointment as senior research engineer in the Nuclear Engineering Department, where he teaches a course and supervises graduate student research. He is spokesperson for the U.S. Magnetics Program organized under the Virtual Laboratory for Technology of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES). Dr. Minervini’s research interests include applied superconductivity, electromagnetics, cryogenic heat transfer, supercritical helium fluid dynamics, and low-temperature measurements. He has worked on magnet systems for nearly every major application of large-scale superconductivity, including fusion energy, magnetic levitation, energy storage, power generation, magnetic separation, high-energy physics, and medical applications. He has published over 70 papers in these fields. His most recent large project was as principal investigator for the magnetics R&D program supported by OFES as part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Dr. Minervini holds a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point (1970), and S.M. (1974) and Ph.D. (1981) degrees in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also serves as an international advisory editor for Cryogenics and served on the editorial advisory board for Fusion Engineering and Design. He is a board member of the Applied Superconductivity Conference and serves on the board of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference and is a member of the standing committee for the Symposium on Fusion Engineering. Dr. Minervini is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science J. Michael Rowe retired from the National Institute of Standards and Technology in 2003. Dr. Rowe received a B.Sc. in engineering physics from Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, and a Ph.D. in physics from McMaster University. In 1966 he joined Argonne National Laboratory, and in 1973 he joined the staff of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, formerly NBS). His research interests are in the area of neutron scattering from condensed matter, with a particular focus on simple liquids, hydrogen in metals, and phase transitions in molecular crystals. In 1986 he became the manager of the Cold Neutron Project, which developed the only fully competitive capability in the United States for research using cold neutrons. He served as the director of the NIST Center for Neutron Research from 1989 until his retirement. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Rowe received Presidential rank awards as a Distinguished Federal Executive in 1992 and Meritorious Federal Executive in 2003, and received the Samuel Wesley Stratton Award in 1994 for his research on hydrogen in metals. In 2004, he was the first recipient of the Clifford G. Shull Prize in Neutron Science given by the Neutron Scattering Society of America. He has served on many advisory panels and committees, including the Solid State Sciences Committee and Basic Energy Science Advisory Committee. John M. Rowell holds a Distinguished Visiting Professor position at Arizona State University. He graduated from Oxford University (B.S., M.S., Ph.D.). He worked at Bell Telephone Laboratories for 23 years as a scientist, department head, and director. At Bellcore for 5 years he was assistant vice president of solid state science and technology. He then joined Conductus, a start-up company formed after the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity, where he worked for 6 years as chief technical officer. Dr. Rowell is renowned for his first observation, with P.W. Anderson, of the Josephson Effect and holds the first patent granted for an electronics application of that phenomenon. With W.L. McMillan he developed tunneling spectroscopy. With M. Gurvitch and a number of Bell Labs colleagues he invented the niobium/aluminum trilayer process, which is now used universally for SQUIDs and for digital circuit fabrication. He was awarded the Fritz London Memorial Low Temperature Physics Prize with W.L. McMillan, is a fellow of the Royal Society, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Panel on Superconductivity (1987), the Panel on Condensed-Matter Physics (1983-1986), and the Panel on Artificially Structured Materials (1984-1985). Mansour Shayegan is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. He received his B.S. (1979), M.S. and E.E. (1981), and Ph.D.

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science (1983) degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He spent 2 years as a research associate in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Maryland before joining the faculty at Princeton in 1985. His research activities include semiconductor physics, electronic properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures, and growth of III-V compounds by molecular beam epitaxy. In 1986, he received an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award and an IBM Faculty Development Award, in 1989 an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, in 1993 a Fulbright Fellowship for lecturing and research in Germany, and in 1997 an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship for research in Germany. Dr. Shayegan is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Robert Tycko is the chief of the Solid-State NMR and Biomolecular Physics Section of the Laboratory of Chemical Physics in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. He has held this position since 1998. Dr. Tycko received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1984. Prior to joining the NIH in 1994, Dr. Tycko spent 8 years as a member of the technical staff in the Materials Chemistry Research Department of AT&T Bell Laboratories. His research focuses on the development of solid-state NMR methods for structural studies of biopolymers and on the application of these methods to problems in biophysics, biochemistry, and structural biology. Examples of systems of interest include peptides and proteins that interact with biological membranes, amyloid fibrils associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and disordered states of proteins involved in protein folding processes. Dr. Tycko’s research is highly interdisciplinary, drawing heavily on experimental and theoretical techniques of both the physical and the biological sciences. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society (1997) and has received the NIH Director’s Award (2001), the Max T. Rogers Distinguished Lectureship (2003), and the R.W. Vaughan Lectureship (2004). Dr. Tycko is currently a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Magnetic Resonance and the Journal of Chemical Physics. He served as chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Magnetic Resonance in 2001. Valerii Vinokur is a senior scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, where he is also director of the Materials Theory Institute in the Materials Science Division. His research interests include the dynamics of disordered media and nonequilibrium stochastic dynamics; disordered superconductors: flux pinning, flux dynamics, and related phenomena; mesoscopic superconductivity and magnetism, spintronics, and coupled magnetosuperconducting nanostructures; and electronic transport in quantum and low-dimensional systems. Prior to joining Argonne in 1990, Dr. Vinokur held appointments at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich Institut für Theoretische Physik (ITP) in Zürich, Switzerland, Leiden

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science University in the Netherlands, and the USSR Academy of Science. He received his Ph.D. in 1979 from the USSR Academy of Science Institute of Solid State Physics. He has been a Fellow of the American Physical Society since 1998, and received the 2003 John Bardeen Prize for Theory of Superconductivity for his work on the Theory of Vortex Matter. NRC STAFF Donald C. Shapero, director of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, received a B.S. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1964 and a Ph.D. from there in 1970. His thesis addressed the asymptotic behavior of relativistic quantum field theories. After receiving the Ph.D., he became a Thomas J. Watson postdoctoral fellow at IBM. He subsequently became an assistant professor at American University, later moving to Catholic University and then joining the staff of the National Research Council in 1975. He took a leave of absence from the NRC in 1978 to serve as the first executive director of the Energy Research Advisory Board at the Department of Energy. He returned to the NRC in 1979 to serve as special assistant to the president of the National Academy of Sciences. In 1982, he started the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA). As BPA director, he has played a key role in many NRC studies, including the two most recent surveys of physics and the two most recent surveys of astronomy and astrophysics. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Astronomical Society, and the International Astronomical Union. He has published research articles in refereed journals in high-energy physics, condensed-matter physics, and environmental science. Timothy I. Meyer is a program officer at the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy. He received a Notable Achievement Award from the NRC’s Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences in 2003 and a Distinguished Service Award from the National Academies in 2004. Dr. Meyer joined the NRC staff in 2002 after earning his Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from Stanford University. His doctoral thesis concerned the time evolution of the B meson in the BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. His work also focused on radiation monitoring and protection of silicon-based particle detectors. During his time at Stanford, Dr. Meyer received both the Paul Kirkpatrick Award and the Centennial Teaching Award for his work as an instructor of undergraduates. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Phi Beta Kappa.