B
Committee Member and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

LENNARD A. FISK, chair, is the Thomas M. Donahue Collegiate Professor of Space Science in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences at the University of Michigan. He is an active researcher in both theoretical and experimental studies of the solar atmosphere and its expansion into space to form the heliosphere. From 1987 to 1993, he was the associate administrator for space science and applications and chief scientist of NASA. From 1977 to 1987, he served as professor of physics and vice president for research and financial affairs at the University of New Hampshire. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Space Studies Board (SSB).


DANIEL N. BAKER is director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and a professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences at the University of Colorado. His primary research interest is the study of plasma physical and energetic particle phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres and in Earth’s magnetosphere. He was a member of the staff at Los Alamos National Laboratory and leader of its Space Plasma Physics Group, and he was chief of the Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He is a current member of the SSB and chair of its Committee on Solar and Space Physics, and he is a former member of the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future.


ANA P. BARROS is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Duke University. Her primary research interests are in hydrology and environmental fluid dynamics with a focus on water-cycle processes in the coupled land-atmosphere-biosphere environment and the study of multiscale interface phenomena in complex systems across the Earth sciences. She is a member of the SSB.


RETA F. BEEBE is a research professor in the Astronomy Department at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces. Her research activities involve the study of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and in particular, studies of cloud motions and evolution in Jupiter’s atmosphere. She is the author of several books and articles concerning telescopic observations of the giant planets, including Jupiter: The Giant Planet. She serves on the SSB and chairs its Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration. She chaired the Solar System Exploration Survey Panel on Giant Planets.


ROGER D. BLANDFORD is the Pehong and Adele Chen Professor of Physics and director of the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University. His research interests cover cosmology, black hole astrophysics, gravitational lensing, galaxies, cosmic rays, neutron stars, and white dwarfs. He participated in the last two astronomy and astrophysics decadal surveys and was a member of the Committee on the Physics of the Universe, which produced the NRC report Connecting Quarks with the Cosmos. He currently co-chairs the NRC Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics and serves on the SSB. He is a fellow of both the Royal Astronomical Society and the Royal Society and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


RADFORD BYERLY, JR., is a senior fellow in the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Colorado. Formerly he worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (then



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Science in NASA’s Vision for Space Exploration B Committee Member and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS LENNARD A. FISK, chair, is the Thomas M. Donahue Collegiate Professor of Space Science in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences at the University of Michigan. He is an active researcher in both theoretical and experimental studies of the solar atmosphere and its expansion into space to form the heliosphere. From 1987 to 1993, he was the associate administrator for space science and applications and chief scientist of NASA. From 1977 to 1987, he served as professor of physics and vice president for research and financial affairs at the University of New Hampshire. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Space Studies Board (SSB). DANIEL N. BAKER is director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and a professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences at the University of Colorado. His primary research interest is the study of plasma physical and energetic particle phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres and in Earth’s magnetosphere. He was a member of the staff at Los Alamos National Laboratory and leader of its Space Plasma Physics Group, and he was chief of the Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He is a current member of the SSB and chair of its Committee on Solar and Space Physics, and he is a former member of the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future. ANA P. BARROS is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Duke University. Her primary research interests are in hydrology and environmental fluid dynamics with a focus on water-cycle processes in the coupled land-atmosphere-biosphere environment and the study of multiscale interface phenomena in complex systems across the Earth sciences. She is a member of the SSB. RETA F. BEEBE is a research professor in the Astronomy Department at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces. Her research activities involve the study of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and in particular, studies of cloud motions and evolution in Jupiter’s atmosphere. She is the author of several books and articles concerning telescopic observations of the giant planets, including Jupiter: The Giant Planet. She serves on the SSB and chairs its Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration. She chaired the Solar System Exploration Survey Panel on Giant Planets. ROGER D. BLANDFORD is the Pehong and Adele Chen Professor of Physics and director of the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University. His research interests cover cosmology, black hole astrophysics, gravitational lensing, galaxies, cosmic rays, neutron stars, and white dwarfs. He participated in the last two astronomy and astrophysics decadal surveys and was a member of the Committee on the Physics of the Universe, which produced the NRC report Connecting Quarks with the Cosmos. He currently co-chairs the NRC Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics and serves on the SSB. He is a fellow of both the Royal Astronomical Society and the Royal Society and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. RADFORD BYERLY, JR., is a senior fellow in the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Colorado. Formerly he worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (then

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Science in NASA’s Vision for Space Exploration the National Bureau of Standards) in the environmental measurement and fire research programs, served as chief of staff of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology, and was director of the University of Colorado’s Center for Space and Geosciences Policy. He is currently a member of the SSB. He served as rapporteur for the NRC workshop report on space policy that was published in early 2004. DONALD E. INGBER is the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology in the Department of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and the Departments of Pathology and Surgery at Children’s Hospital Boston. He is also a member of the Children’s Hospital Vascular Biology Program, Harvard Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Harvard-MIT Health Science and Technology Division, Harvard-Dana Farber Cancer Center, and MIT Center for Bioengineering. Although trained in cell biology and medicine, he has integrated approaches from molecular biology, engineering, chemistry, microfabrication, nanotechnology, and computer science to define how cells sense and respond to mechanical forces. He is a member of the SSB. TAMARA E. JERNIGAN is principal deputy associate director of the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She is a veteran of five space shuttle missions, having supervised the pre-flight planning and in-flight execution of critical activities aboard five shuttle flights, including serving as mission specialist on the first dedicated life sciences mission, STS-40, and as payload commander of STS-67. Formerly she served as deputy chief of the astronaut office and as deputy to the chief of the Astronaut Office for the Space Station. MARGARET G. KIVELSON is Distinguished Professor of Space Physics in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences and the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at UCLA. Her principal scientific interests are the magnetospheric plasma physics of Earth and Jupiter and the interaction of flowing plasmas with planets and moons. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the SSB. She was a participant in the first decadal survey in solar and space physics, The Sun to the Earth—and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, and is a former member of the Committee on Solar and Space Physics and of the NRC Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. LAURIE LESHIN is the Dee and John Whiteman Dean’s Distinguished Professor of Geological Sciences and director of the Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University. She is a cosmochemist whose research focuses on understanding the formation and evolution of Earth’s solar system and its planets. She studies the water content of meteorites in an effort to understand the occurrence of water on Earth and how water on Mars could affect the possibility of life there. She was a member of the 2004 President’s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy. SUZANNE OPARIL is a professor of medicine, physiology, and biophysics and director of the Vascular Biology and Hypertension Program in the Division of Cardiovascular Disease at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She is an active investigator in the laboratory, as well as in the clinical setting, and directs a large basic and clinical research group in vascular biology and hypertension. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and is a current member of the SSB. She has served as president of the American Federation of Clinical Research and the American Heart Association. GEORGE A. PAULIKAS retired after 37 years at The Aerospace Corporation, having joined Aerospace in 1961 as a member of the technical staff and later becoming department head, laboratory director, vice president, senior vice president, and executive vice president. He has been at the forefront of advances in space science and space systems, making many technical contributions to the development of national security space systems. He is a current member of the SSB and serves as its vice-chair.

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Science in NASA’s Vision for Space Exploration RONALD F. PROBSTEIN is Ford Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research has centered on applications of fluid mechanics, both theoretical and experimental, to numerous areas of technical, scientific, economic, or societal importance, including hypersonic flows, rarefied gas dynamics, reentry physics, dust comets, desalination, physicochemical hydrodynamics, synthetic fuels, electrokinetic soil remediation, and slurry rheology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a current member of the SSB, and he previously served on the NRC Committee on Microgravity Research. DENNIS W. READEY is the Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor of Ceramic Engineering and director of the Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics at the Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics. His current research interests include the properties of ceramics, processing and properties of ceramic-metal composites, combustion synthesis in reactive atmospheres, and the effect of gravity on gas/solid reactions. He has held research positions at Argonne National Laboratory, Raytheon Company, the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, and Ohio State University. He is a current member of the SSB. EDWARD C. STONE is the David Morrisroe Professor of Physics at the California Institute of Technology and former director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (1991-2001). Since 1972, he has been the project scientist for the Voyager mission, coordinating the scientific study of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune and Voyager’s continuing exploration of the outer heliosphere and search for the edge of interstellar space. His research has focused on studying galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, and planetary magnetospheres. He is president of the International Academy of Astronautics and is a vice president of COSPAR. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and he formerly served on the NRC Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources and on the Space Studies Board. HARVEY D. TANANBAUM is director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory’s Chandra X-ray Center, where he is responsible for overseeing of the operation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and providing support to the scientific users of the observatory. In 1981 he became associate director for high energy astrophysics at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, a position he held for 12 years. He is a current member of the SSB, and he previously served on the NRC Committee on the Physics of the Universe. J. CRAIG WHEELER is the Samuel T. and Fern Yanagisawa Regents Professor of Astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin and past chair of the department. His research interests include supernovae, black holes, and astrobiology. He has published more than 300 scientific papers, a recent popular book on supernovae and gamma-ray bursts, and a novel, and he has edited five books. He has served as chair of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society and vice-president of the AAS. He is currently a member of the SSB and co-chair of its Committee on the Origins and Evolution of Life. A. THOMAS YOUNG is retired executive vice president of Lockheed Martin. He previously was president and chief operating officer of Martin Marietta Corp. Prior to joining industry, Mr. Young worked for 21 years at NASA, where he directed the Goddard Space Flight Center, was deputy director of the Ames Research Center, and directed the Planetary Program in the Office of Space Science at NASA headquarters. He is a former member of the NASA Advisory Council and chaired its International Space Station Management and Cost Evaluation Task Force. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a current member of the SSB, and a former member of the NRC Committee on a New Science Strategy for Solar System Exploration.

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Science in NASA’s Vision for Space Exploration STAFF JOSEPH K. ALEXANDER is director of the Space Studies Board. He served previously as deputy assistant administrator for science in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development (1994-1998), associate director of space sciences at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (1993-1994), and assistant associate administrator for space sciences and applications in the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications (1987-1993). Other positions have included deputy NASA chief scientist and senior policy analyst at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Mr. Alexander’s own research work has been in radio astronomy and space physics. He received his B.S. and M.A. degrees in physics from the College of William and Mary. DAVID H. SMITH joined the staff of the Space Studies Board in 1991. He is the senior staff officer and study director for a variety of NRC activities, including the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration and the Committee on the Origins and Evolution of Life. He received a B.Sc. in mathematical physics from the University of Liverpool in 1976 and a D.Phil. in theoretical astrophysics from Sussex University in 1981. Following a postdoctoral fellowship at Queen Mary College, University (1980-1982) he held the position of associate editor and, later, technical editor of Sky and Telescope. Immediately prior to joining the staff of the Space Studies Board, Dr. Smith was a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1990-1991). CLAUDETTE K. BAYLOR-FLEMING has worked as a senior program assistant with the NRC’s Space Studies Board since 1995, primarily as the program assistant to the director and administrative officer. She came to the NRC in 1988, first serving as senior secretary for the Institute of Medicine’s Division of Health Sciences Policy, and then working for 7 years as the administrative/financial assistant for the NRC’s Board on Global Change. In 2003, Ms. Baylor-Fleming completed two certificate programs, one at the Catholic University of America in Web technologies and the other at Trinity College of Washington in information technology applications. She is currently pursuing a B.A. in graphic design from American University. CATHERINE A. GRUBER is an assistant editor with the Space Studies Board (SSB). She joined SSB as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber first came to the NRC in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, then as an outreach assistant for the National Academy of Sciences-Smithsonian Institution’s National Science Resources Center. She was also a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a B.A. in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland.