H
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF

KRISTINE M. GEBBIE (Chair) is the Elizabeth Standish Gill Associate Professor of Nursing, director for the Center for Health Policy, and the director of the Doctor of Nursing Science Program at Columbia University School of Nursing. Her teaching and research focus is on health policy and health services, with particular attention to population-based health services. Prior to Columbia, she was the first White House National AIDS Policy Coordinator (1993–1994) and served 4 years as a senior consultant on health initiatives to the Office of Public Health and Science for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Gebbie is active in many professional organizations and has served as a member on the executive board of the American Public Health Association. Most recently, her completed research includes the first enumeration of the public health workforce in 20 years, and the development of core competencies in emergency preparedness for public health workers. Among her previous Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee experience, Dr. Gebbie served as the vice chair of the Committee on Smallpox Vaccination Program Implementation, and co-chair on the Committee on Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Dr. Gebbie received her master’s of nursing from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her doctorate in public health from the University of Michigan School of Public Health. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine.


WADE M. AUBRY is a senior advisor with the Health Technology Center. In this capacity he produces forecast reports on such subjects as the future of stem cells, genetic testing, cancer pharmaceuticals, and remote patient



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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program H BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF KRISTINE M. GEBBIE (Chair) is the Elizabeth Standish Gill Associate Professor of Nursing, director for the Center for Health Policy, and the director of the Doctor of Nursing Science Program at Columbia University School of Nursing. Her teaching and research focus is on health policy and health services, with particular attention to population-based health services. Prior to Columbia, she was the first White House National AIDS Policy Coordinator (1993–1994) and served 4 years as a senior consultant on health initiatives to the Office of Public Health and Science for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Gebbie is active in many professional organizations and has served as a member on the executive board of the American Public Health Association. Most recently, her completed research includes the first enumeration of the public health workforce in 20 years, and the development of core competencies in emergency preparedness for public health workers. Among her previous Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee experience, Dr. Gebbie served as the vice chair of the Committee on Smallpox Vaccination Program Implementation, and co-chair on the Committee on Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Dr. Gebbie received her master’s of nursing from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her doctorate in public health from the University of Michigan School of Public Health. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. WADE M. AUBRY is a senior advisor with the Health Technology Center. In this capacity he produces forecast reports on such subjects as the future of stem cells, genetic testing, cancer pharmaceuticals, and remote patient

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program management. He also serves as associate physician diplomate at the UCSF Institute for Health Policy Studies, a health care consultant, and has a practice in internal medicine and endocrinology. Dr. Aubry also served as a medical consultant for Blue Cross Blue Shield Association until 2002. In that capacity he represented their system in a number of national roles related to health and disease management, technology assessment and coverage decision making, research initiatives, performance measurement, CPT coding, and quality of care. Dr. Aubry is a member of the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee and also served on the IOM Committee on Technologies for Early Detection of Breast Cancer and as a member of the IOM Clinical Research Roundtable. He is a member of the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association, the California Medical Association, and the Academy for Health Services Research and Health Policy, among others. Dr. Aubry has published in a wide variety of periodicals on subjects ranging from managed care to balancing science, economics, and policy. He earned his B.S. in biological sciences from Stanford University and his M.D. degree from the University of California Los Angeles. RICHARD CHAMPLIN is chairman, professor of medicine, Department of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, and associate head, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Champlin is the 2004 winner of the Thomas Lecture Award of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. He is president of the Autologous Bone Marrow Transplant Registry and a member of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the American Society of Hematology, and the International Society for Cell Therapy. Dr. Champlin has published more than 300 articles in peer-reviewed journals and edited or written 9 books. He serves as an editor of Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, a regional editor of Cytotherapy, and an associate editor of Experimental Hematology. Dr. Champlin earned his B.S. in engineering sciences from Purdue University and his M.D. from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. JAMES F. CHILDRESS is the John Allen Hollingsworth Professor of Ethics and professor of medical education at the University of Virginia, where he teaches in the Department of Religious Studies and directs the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life. He served as chair of the Department of Religious Studies, 1972–1975 and 1986–1994, as principal of UVA’s Monroe Hill College from 1988 to 1991, and as codirector of the Virginia Health Policy Center 1991–1999. In 1990 he was named Professor of the Year in the state of Virginia by the Council for the Advancement and

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program Support of Education, and in 2002 he received the University of Virginia’s highest honor—the Thomas Jefferson Award. Childress is the author of numerous articles and several books in biomedical ethics, including Principles of Biomedical Ethics (with Tom L. Beauchamp), now in its fifth edition and translated into several other languages; Priorities in Biomedical Ethics; Who Should Decide? Paternalism in Health Care; and Practical Reasoning in Bioethics, along with a number of articles and books in other areas of ethics. Childress was vice chair of the national Task Force on Organ Transplantation, and he has also served on the board of directors of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), the UNOS Ethics Committee, the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee, the Human Gene Therapy Subcommittee, the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee, and several Data and Safety Monitoring Boards for National Institutes of Health clinical trials. He was a member of the presidentially appointed National Bioethics Advisory Commission 1996–2001. Childress is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also a fellow of the Hastings Center. He has been the Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr., Professor of Christian Ethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University (1975–79) and a visiting professor at the University of Chicago Divinity School and Princeton University. He received his B.A. from Guilford College, his B.D. from Yale Divinity School, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University. CHARLES FISKE founded and spent 10 years as the director of the National Organ Transplant Action Committee, an organ transplant patient advocacy organization. Since 1986, he has also served as the director of the Family Inn Foundation. This foundation established and operates temporary housing for families of medical patients. Mr. Fisk is also a senior executive of Brockton Area Multi-Services, Inc. This agency runs over 120 human services programs in Massachusetts which specialize in mental health, developmental disabilities, education, public health, informational, elderly, and children’s services. Mr. Fiske coordinates all aspects of the agency’s communication, government relations, and developmental needs. He served as a reviewer of the IOM’s “Organ Procurement and Transplantation” report. Mr. Fiske holds a B.A. and an M.Div. from St. John’s College and an M.Ed. from Boston State University. He is a licensed clinical social worker. ROBERT D. GIBBONS is a professor of biostatistics, psychiatry, and director of the Center for Health Statistics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received his doctorate in statistics and psychometrics from the

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program University of Chicago in 1981. He received a Young Scientist Award from the Office of Naval Research (1981), a Career Scientist Award from the National Institute of Health (1995), in addition to numerous other NIH grants. His research spans the areas of medical, biological, and environmental statistics, with particular emphasis on statistical problems in mental health, health services research, longitudinal data analysis, and environmental regulatory statistics. Dr. Gibbons is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the Youden Prize for statistical contributions to Chemistry and the Harvard Award for contributions to Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Dr. Gibbons has served on several IOM committees including the Committee on Halcion, and the Committee on Organ Procurement and Transplantation, and serves on the IOM Board on Health Sciences Policy. He has authored over 150 peer reviewed papers and 4 books. Dr. Gibbons is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. N. REBECCA HALEY is currently serving as vice president of StemCo Biomedical, Inc., directing regulatory policy, quality assurance programs, and medical and clinical studies. Prior to that position, Dr. Haley served as the senior medical officer for cell therapy at the American Red Cross. There she was responsible for overseeing National Marrow Donor Program-American Red Cross donor recruitment and collection activities at 23 centers, and managed the applications for the programs associated with the National Marrow Donor Program on a national level. Dr. Haley is a member of the American Society of Hematology, the American Association of Blood Banks, the International Society of Cell Therapy, the International Society, and a diplomate on the National Board of Medical Examiners. She is widely published on the subject of blood and banking operations. Dr. Haley holds a B.S. in medical technology from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and an M.D. from Eastern Virginia Medical School. MARY M. HOROWITZ is the scientific director of the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry. In addition to that role, she also serves as a professor in the Health Policy Institute at the Medical College of Wisconsin, as interim director of the Bone Marrow Transplant Program at the Medical College of Wisconsin, and as chair of hematologic research in the division of neoplastic diseases and related disorders at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She is on the board of directors at the National Marrow Donor Program. Among other professional activities, Dr. Horowitz served on the ad hoc Cord Blood Advisory Committee at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, was an invited participant in the National Cancer Institute/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s workshop on clinical trials in transplantation, and served on the American Society for Clinical

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program Oncology’s expert panel on stem cell transplantation. She is a member several professional organizations, including: the American Society for Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Hematology, the International Society for Experimental Hematology, and the World Marrow Donor Association. Dr. Horowitz has written well over 150 articles in reviewed journals, and more than 30 book chapters. She sits on the editorial boards of several journals, including: Blood, Bone Marrow Transplantation, and Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. She earned her B.S. in zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, her M.D. from the Medical College of Wisconsin, and her M.S. in biostatistics/clinical epidemiology from the Medical College of Wisconsin. SUZANNE T. ILDSTAD is director of the Institute for Cellular Therapeutics (ICT), the Jewish Hospital Distinguished Professor of Transplantation, and professor of surgery at the University of Louisville. ICT is a multidisciplinary translational research program designed to develop cellular therapies and rapidly transfer them from the laboratory to the clinic. Dr. Ildstad’s research focuses on developing methods to make bone marrow transplantation safe enough for widespread application to treat autoimmune diseases, to induce tolerance to organ and islet cell transplants, and to treat hemoglobinopathies like sickle-cell disease and thalassemia. She is credited with the first discovery of “facilitator cells,” bone marrow cells that enhance engraftment of bone marrow stem cells while avoiding graft-versus-host reactivity. She also pioneered the use of mixed chimerism to induce tolerance to allografts and xenografts. More recently her work has focused on stem cell plasticity for regeneration of damaged organs, including cardiac and retinal tissue. She holds numerous patents related to her research and is the founding scientist of Regenerex, L.L.C., and a biotechnology company whose vision is to provide an engineered bone marrow graft to improve the safety of bone marrow transplantation. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1997 and has served on the committee for human rights (1999 to present) as well as on IOM committees studying organ transplantation policies (1999), multiple sclerosis research strategies (2001), the challenges of small clinical trials (2001), a fast-track committee which she chaired, and spinal cord injury: strategies in a search for a cure (2003–2005). LINDA L. KELLEY is the director of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Medicine at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She also serves as the director of Pediatric and Adult Aphaeresis at the Primary Children’s Medical Center, University of Utah Hospital, director of Cellular Therapies at the US Tissue & Cell Western Division, and a member of the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Dr. Kelley is an inspector on the

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and also serves on the organization’s board of trustees. She is a member of the American Association of Blood Banks Cellular Therapy Committee, the National Marrow Donor Program’s Cord Bank Committee and Quality Standards Subcommittee, and a multidisciplinary task force on legislative and regulatory relations. She is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association of Blood Banks, the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the American Society for Hematology, and the International Society for Cell Therapy. She has published more than 20 articles in peer-reviewed journals in addition to organizing multiple symposia and giving guest lectures. Dr. Kelley serves as a referee for Blood, Experimental Hematology, Bone Marrow Transplantation, and Transfusion, among other journals. Dr. Kelley holds a B.S. from the University of New Hampshire, completed her graduate studies at Dartmouth college, and earned her Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University’s Department of Pathology. J. MICHAEL MCGINNIS is senior vice president and director of the Health Group at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Previously, Dr. McGinnis was Scholar-in-Residence at the National Academy of Science. He served through four successive Administrations (1977–1995) as Assistant Surgeon General, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health and director of the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Dr. McGinnis served as principal architect for the Health People process to establish and implement national health goals and objectives, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the first Surgeon General’s Report on Nutrition and Health, and the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force which produced the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services. He also has extensive international experience, which includes service as chair of the task force to rebuild the health sector in Bosnia and as state coordinator for the smallpox eradication program in India. Dr. McGinnis has a B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley, and an M.D. and M.A. from the University of California at Los Angeles, and an M.P.P. from Harvard University. He is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. McGinnis is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He is currently active as a member of the Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research and Medicine. DAVID O. MELTZER is an associate professor in the Department of Medicine, Department of Economics, and the Graduate School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. There, he is also the codirector of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. He teaches a course in

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program “Health Economics and Public Policy,” lectures on cost-effectiveness analysis and medical decision analysis, and organizes workshops on health economics. He is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, a reviewer on NIH, NIMH, and AHCPR ad hoc study sections, and has served on previous IOM committees. He is a reviewer for American Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Journal of Health Economics, and Medical Decision Making, among others. Dr. Meltzer earned his B.S. from Yale College and his M.D. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. KENNETH J. MOISE, JR., is a professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. He also serves as obstetrician-in-chief at North Carolina Women’s Hospital. He is a member of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, the National Bone Marrow Donor Program Cord Blood Subcommittee, the International Fetal Medicine and Surgery Society, and the Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, among others. Dr. Moise holds a patent in Rh blood group antigen compositions and methods of use. He has published more than 150 journal articles, 2 books, and given almost 200 presentations. He is an associate editor for the Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Special Edition of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and sits on the editorial board of the Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. Dr. Moise also serves in an editorial consultantship for Pediatric Research, Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Prenatal Diagnosis, among others. He earned his B.S. in zoology from Louisiana State University and his M.D. from Louisiana State University Medical School. LARRY I. PALMER holds the Endowed Chair in Urban Health Policy at the University of Louisville, with appointments in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law, and the School of Public Health and Information Sciences. Prior to joining the University of Louisville, he was a professor of law at Cornell University Law School in Ithaca, New York. Professor Palmer is the author of Law, Medicine, and Social Justice (1989), Endings and Beginnings: Law, Medicine and Society in Assisted Life and Death (2000), and numerous articles dealing with law, medicine, and health policy. Professor Palmer is also the executive producer and author of the study guide of the prize-winning educational video Susceptible to Kindness: Miss Evers’ Boys and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. He is a director of the Hastings Center in Garrison, New York, and a member of the American Bar Association’s Bioethics and the Law Coordinating Committee. Previously, Professor Palmer served as a director of the National Patient Safety Foundation (1997–2002) and a trustee of the Phillips Exeter Academy (1990–2000).

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program Professor Palmer was a vice provost at Cornell from 1979–1984 and a vice president from 1987–1994. In addition to his positions at Cornell and the University of Louisville, he has held appointments at the University of Texas School of Law at Austin, the University of Virginia School of Law, Rutgers University Law School-Camden, Villanova School of Law, Emory Law School, The Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen-Nürnberg, and Clare Hall, Cambridge University. Professor Palmer received his B.A. from Harvard College and his LL.B. from Yale Law School. DAVID T. SCADDEN is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, is codirector of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine and Technology. He currently serves on the executive committee of the Harvard Medical School Division of AIDS and is a member of the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Counselors at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Scadden is currently chief of the Hematologic Malignancies Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. The focus of his research is on using stem cells in regenerating the blood and immune systems in patients with cancer and AIDS. His emphasis is on defining the basic principles of how stem cells function to develop practical strategies for repairing tissues. He has been elected to the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the Interurban Clinical Club. Dr. Scadden serves as an associate editor for Blood and is a member of the editorial board for the journals Experimental Hematology and Stem Cells. He received a B.A. in English literature from Bucknell University and an M.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. JOHN E. WAGNER, JR., is professor of pediatrics at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine. He is the Variety Children’s Association Chair in Molecular and Cellular Therapy at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, the Stem Cell Institute clinical director, and the scientific director of clinical research for the Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Stem Cell Institute at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine. Dr. Wagner is a member of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Cord Blood Banking and Transplantation Steering Committee and on the board of directors of the National Marrow Donor Program. He is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha, the American Society of Hematology, the International Society of Experimental Hematology, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the American Society of Clinical Investigation. Dr. Wagner holds a patent in pluripotential quiescent stem cell population. He is an ad hoc reviewer for the American Journal of Medicine, the American Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, the

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program Journal of the Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and Stem Cells, among others. Dr. Wagner holds a B.A. in biological sciences, a B.A. in psychology from the University of Delaware, and an M.D. from Jefferson Medical College. ANDREW M. YEAGER is director of the Stem Cell Transplantation Program, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; director of the Stem Cell Transplantation Biology Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute; and professor of medicine (pediatrics) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Yeager previously served in several capacities at Emory University, among them as director of the school’s Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Biology and Transplantation Program at the school’s departments of medicine and pediatrics and the Winship Cancer Institute. Dr. Yeager is a member of several professional societies, including: the American Society of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, the International Society for Experimental Hematology, the American Society for Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation, the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry, and the International Pediatric Transplant Association. He is an editor of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Stem Cells, and the American Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Yeager holds a B.A. in human biology and an M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University. IOM PROJECT STAFF EMILY ANN MEYER, J.D., is project director for the study Establishing a National Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank Program. Emily Ann earned her law degree at Hamline University, where she also served as a research fellow. Prior to coming to IOM, she worked in the Division of Engineering and Physical Sciences’ National Materials Advisory Board. There she led a study on the globalization of materials research and development and spearheaded the development of a multi unit study on evaluating the feasibility of a national ballistics database. SHIRA HANNAH FISCHER, B.A., is a research associate for the study Establishing a National Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank Program. She has worked at the IOM for 2 years on projects ranging from the strategic planning effort with the executive office to the report New Frontiers in Contraceptive Research. Shira received her degree in biochemical sciences from Harvard College. BENJAMIN N. HAMLIN, B.A., is a research associate at the Institute of Medicine. He received his bachelor’s degree in biology from the College of Wooster in 1993 and a degree in clinical health sciences from the University

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Cord Blood: Establishing a National Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank Program of Akron in 1996. He then worked as a surgeon’s assistant in the fields of vascular, thoracic, and general surgery for several years before joining The National Academies in 2000. As a research assistant for the Division on Earth and Life Studies at the National Academies, Ben worked with the Board on Radiation Effects Research on projects studying the health effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiations on the human body. His work at the Institute of Medicine has included Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions, Review of NASA’s Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health, Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion, Improving Medical Education: Enhancing the Behavioral and Social Science Content in Medical School Curricula, and NIH Extramural Center Programs: Criteria for Initiation and Evaluation. He is also involved with the U.S. Bangladesh Advisory Council, an organization that promotes governmental cooperation between the United States and Bangladesh on matters of trade and health care. JUDITH L. ESTEP is the senior program assistant for the study Establishing a National Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank Program. She has worked at The National Academies/IOM since 1986 and has provided administrative support for more than 32 published reports. Her interests outside the IOM include family (11 grandchildren), four-wheeling, and working her draft horses for competition.