TABLE 3-1 Ration Nutrient Composition Recommended by the Committee

Nutrient or Energy Intake

Recommended Amount

Comments

Energy Intake

2,400 kcal in basic ration

Additional 400 kcal should be supplemented as carbohydrate in form of candy, gels, or powder to add to fluids, or all three.

Macronutrients

 

Protein

100–120 g

Protein should be of high biological value.

Preferable to add sources of protein with low-sulfur amino acids and low oxalate levels to minimize risk of kidney stone formation.

Carbohydrate

350 g

100 g as a supplement

Additional 100 g should be supplemented as carbohydrate in form of candy, gels, or powder to add to fluids, or all three.

Amount of fructose as a monosaccharide should be limited to < 25 g.

Fiber

15–17 g

Naturally occurring or added.

A mix of viscous, nonfermentable and nonviscous, fermentable fiber should be in the ration for gastrointestinal tract function.

Fat

22–25% kcal

58–67 g

Fat added to the ration should have a balanced mix of saturated, polyunsaturated, and monounsaturated fatty acids with palatability and stability the prime determinants of the specific mixture. Fat should contain 5–10% linoleic acid and 0.6–1.2% α-linolenic acid.

Vitamins

 

Vitamin A

300–900 µg

RAE1

Could be added as preformed vitamin A or provitamin A carotenoids.

Vitamin C

180–400 mg

Highly labile in processed food.

If added to foods, encapsulation should be considered to prevent degradation through interaction with pro-oxidants.

Vitamin D

12.5–15 µg

Estimates of dietary intake are not available. Range based on ensuring serum levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D.

Vitamin E (α-tocopherol)

15–20 mg

Should be added to foods since natural foods are mainly sources of γ- rather than α-tocopherol.

Vitamin K

No recommended level

Amount in foods would be adequate provided ration is at least 50% whole foods.2



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