C
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

Lynn B. Bailey, Ph.D., is a professor at the University of Florida. Her research area of expertise is folate metabolism, estimation of folate requirements, and factors that influence disease and birth defect risk including genetic polymorphisms. Dr. Bailey has conducted human metabolic studies over a period of 25 years generating data that has been instrumental in establishing new dietary intake recommendations for individuals throughout the lifecycle including pregnant women and the elderly. In recognition of Dr. Bailey’s established scientific expertise, she has frequently been invited to serve as a scientific advisor for national organizations. For example, she served as a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Dietary Reference Intake committee for folate and other vitamins; she was a member of the Food and Drug Administration’s Folic Acid Advisory Committee that recommended folic acid fortification of the food supply in the US; and she has served as a scientific advisor to the Centers for Disease Control and the Pan American Health Organization on projects focused on neural tube defect prevention. Dr. Bailey has received very prestigious awards including the USDA Award for Superior Service based on accomplishments in the area of folate nutrition, and the national March of Dimes’ Agnes Higgins Award for research related to fetal and maternal health. In addition, she was recently awarded the 2004 American Society of Nutritional Sciences Centrum Center Award for research accomplishments related to human folate requirements. Dr. Bailey received her Ph.D. in nutrition from Purdue University.


Rebecca B. Costello, Ph.D., is the Deputy Director of the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Costello participated in the development of the ODS Strategic Plan in 1998 and more recently in



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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations C Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers Lynn B. Bailey, Ph.D., is a professor at the University of Florida. Her research area of expertise is folate metabolism, estimation of folate requirements, and factors that influence disease and birth defect risk including genetic polymorphisms. Dr. Bailey has conducted human metabolic studies over a period of 25 years generating data that has been instrumental in establishing new dietary intake recommendations for individuals throughout the lifecycle including pregnant women and the elderly. In recognition of Dr. Bailey’s established scientific expertise, she has frequently been invited to serve as a scientific advisor for national organizations. For example, she served as a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Dietary Reference Intake committee for folate and other vitamins; she was a member of the Food and Drug Administration’s Folic Acid Advisory Committee that recommended folic acid fortification of the food supply in the US; and she has served as a scientific advisor to the Centers for Disease Control and the Pan American Health Organization on projects focused on neural tube defect prevention. Dr. Bailey has received very prestigious awards including the USDA Award for Superior Service based on accomplishments in the area of folate nutrition, and the national March of Dimes’ Agnes Higgins Award for research related to fetal and maternal health. In addition, she was recently awarded the 2004 American Society of Nutritional Sciences Centrum Center Award for research accomplishments related to human folate requirements. Dr. Bailey received her Ph.D. in nutrition from Purdue University. Rebecca B. Costello, Ph.D., is the Deputy Director of the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Costello participated in the development of the ODS Strategic Plan in 1998 and more recently in

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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations the Strategic Plan for 2004–2009. She is charged with implementing the plan’s goals and objectives by organizing workshops and conferences on topics of national interest in dietary supplements, conducting scientific reviews to identify gaps in scientific knowledge, and initiating and coordinating research efforts among NIH Institutes and other federal agencies. Dr. Costello also oversees the development and management of the ODS-USDA National Agricultural Library’s IBIDS database of scientific literature on dietary supplements. Prior to her NIH appointment, she was with the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences, serving as Project Director for the Committee on Military Nutrition Research. From 1987 to 1996, Dr. Costello served as a Research Associate and Program Director for the Risk Factor Reduction Center, a referral center at the Washington Adventist Hospital for the detection, modification, and prevention of cardiovascular disease through dietary and/or drug interventions. She received a B.S. and M.S. in biology from the American University, Washington, D.C., and a Ph.D. in clinical nutrition from the University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Costello maintains active membership in several nutrition societies and the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention. Her areas of research interest include mineral nutrition, dietary intake methodology, and dietary interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease. Edward F. Coyle, Ph.D., serves as the director of the Human Performance Laboratory and professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Coyle’s research has focused upon the metabolic and cardiovascular factors that limit aerobic exercise performance. He is a North American delegate for the sports nutrition working group of the International Olympic Committee. Dr. Coyle has recently received the Distinguished Faculty Award for 2002 at The University of Texas at Austin. He is currently a member of the American Physiological Society, American Institute of Nutrition, American Society for Clinical Nutrition, and the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education. Dr. Coyle received his Ph.D. in animal physiology from The University of Arizona. John M. de Castro, Ph.D., serves as a professor and chair in the Department of Psychology at the University of Texas at El Paso. He previously served as the chair in the Department of Psychology at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Dr. de Castro’s research interests include the control of behavior in free-living humans; psychological, social, nutritional, genetic, and physiological determinants of microregulatory patterns; food and fluid intake regulation; obesity; bulimia nervosa; and behavior genetics. He received his Ph.D. in biopsychology at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. Jørn W. Helge, Ph.D., holds the title of Associate Professor at the Department of Medical Physiology, and is on the faculty of Health Sciences. He received his

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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations masters and doctorate at the Copenhagen Muscle Research Centre and Department of Human Physiology, August Krogh Institute, University of Copenhagen. His primary research areas are the interaction of diet and training and the effects on endurance performance and muscle substrate utilization and the coupling and importance of physical activity/inactivity for the occurrence and attainment of the metabolic Syndrome. L. John Hoffer, M.D., is a professor of medicine at McGill University and senior physician in the Divisions of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology at the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, Canada, where he serves on the nutrition support service. Dr. Hoffer’s research interests include human protein and energy metabolism in response to hypocaloric states and protein restriction. He has served for many years on the Nutrition and Metabolism Committee of the Canadian Institutes for Health Research. Ronald J. Jandacek, Ph.D., is adjunct professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. His undergraduate training was in chemistry at Rice University, and he received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin. After two years in the Army at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, he joined Procter & Gamble’s Miami Valley Laboratories in Cincinnati, where he worked until 2001. At Procter & Gamble his research centered on the relationship of the chemistry and nutritional properties of lipids, with a focus on intestinal absorption. Since 2001 he has collaborated with Dr. Patrick Tso in studies of nutritional effects on the absorption and metabolism of toxic lipophilic xenobiotics. Randall J. Kaplan, Ph.D., is the Director, Nutrition and Scientific Affairs at the Canadian Sugar Institute, a nonprofit association representing all Canadian sugar manufacturers on nutrition and international trade issues. The Institute provides a Nutrition Information Service and is guided by a Scientific Advisory Council of nutrition researchers. Dr. Kaplan obtained M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Nutritional Sciences from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Western Ontario. His research involved investigating the effects of macronutrients on cognitive performance, appetite regulation and glucose regulation in healthy elderly individuals and individuals with diabetes, resulting in numerous scientific publications. He received several awards for his research, including those from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Canadian Society for Nutritional Sciences. Dr. Kaplan has also worked as a consultant on research and regulatory issues for the University of Toronto Program in Food Safety Nutrition and Regulatory Affairs, Food and Consumer Product Manufacturers of Canada, and Kellogg Canada Inc. He is

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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations currently Chair of the World Sugar Research Organization Scientific and Communications Committee, and a member of the National Institute of Nutrition Scientific Advisory Council, University of Toronto Program in Food Safety Scientific-Technical Committee, and Food and Consumer Products Manufacturers of Canada Scientific and Regulatory Affairs Council. He represents the World Sugar Research Organization as an official Observer at sessions of the Codex Alimentarius Commission of the World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Henry C. Lukaski, Ph.D., is the Assistant Center Director and Research Physiologist at the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Human Nutrition Research Center in Grand Forks, North Dakota. He is currently a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Medicine, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Physical Education and Exercise Science and a member of the Sports Medicine Advisory Committee and Research Council at the University of North Dakota. Dr. Lukaski’s research focuses on the interaction of physical activity and mineral nutrient intakes in humans with an emphasis on iron, zinc, copper, magnesium, and chromium to promote health and optimal performance throughout the life cycle. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, the Human Biology Council and Mexican Institute of Nutrition. He is a member of the American Physiological Society, American Society for Nutritional Sciences, American Society for Clinical Nutrition, Endocrine Society, New York Academy of Sciences, Sigma Xi, and Phi Kappa Phi. Dr. Lukaski is a Charter Member of the American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Metabolism and Physical Activity. He serves as a member of the Editorial Boards of Current Nutrition Reviews, International Journal of Applied Sports Science, Nutrition, and CRC Series on Nutrition in Exercise and Sport, and an editorial consultant for a variety of peer-reviewed journals in nutrition, medicine and sport sciences. Dr. Lukaski is a past Associate Editor, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, and a member of the Editorial Boards of the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Journal of Nutrition. He has served as an advisor and consultant to many national and international health agencies and research organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense, Pan American Health Organization, the World Health Organization, and International Olympic Committee. Dr. Lukaski received a master of science and doctoral degrees in physiology and nutrition from the Pennsylvania State University. Linda K. Massey, Ph.D., serves as a professor and scientist of Human Nutrition in the department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Washington State University. She obtained her Ph.D. at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Massey is a national spokesperson for the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Her work focuses on how inadequate calcium and magnesium intake

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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations and excessive salt intake contribute to chronic diseases associated with aging, such as osteoporosis, hypertension, diabetes, kidney stones and cardiovascular disease. Dr. Massey has received several honors including the Outstanding Dietetics Educator from both the Washington State Dietetic Association and the Western Region Dietetic Educators of Practitioners, Excellence in Clinical Practice and Research from the Washington State Dietetics Association, and the Faculty Excellence award for Washington State University, Spokane. Richard D. Mattes, Ph.D., is a professor of Foods & Nutrition at Purdue University, an Adjunct Associate professor of Medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine and an Affiliated Scientist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center. His research focuses on the areas of hunger and satiety, regulation of food intake in humans, food preferences, human cephalic phase responses and taste and smell. At Purdue University, he is presently Chair of the Human Subjects Review Committee, Director of the Analytical Core laboratory for the Botanical Center for Age Related Diseases and is a co-coordinator of the Purdue Resource for Integrative Dietetics and Exercise. He also holds numerous external responsibilities including: editorial board of Ear, Nose and Throat Journal; Chair, adult weight management certificate program at the American Dietetic Association, Chair-elect of the Research Dietetic Practice Group of the American Dietetic Association, Technical Committee member for the Peanut CRSP program in the United States Agency for International Development; and Secretary of the Rose Marie Pangborn Sensory Science Scholarship Fund. Dr. Mattes received his M.P.H. in public health nutrition at the University of Michigan School of Public health and his Ph.D. in Human Nutrition at Cornell University. His professional memberships include the American College of Nutrition, American Dietetic Association, American Society of Clinical Nutrition and Association for Chemoreception Sciences, Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior, Institute of Food Technologists, just to name a few. Simin Nikbin Meydani, Ph.D., is Professor of Nutrition and Immunology and the Director of the Cell and Molecular Nutrition Program at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy and Tufts Sackler Graduate Program in Immunology. She also serves as Director of the Nutritional Immunology Laboratory, at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Dr. Meydani’s present and past professional activities include FAO/WHO Expert Panel member on Nutritional Requirement of the Elderly; American Aging Association Board of Directors and Fund Raising Committee; Gerontological Society Nutrition Steering Committee; NIA Primate Calorie Restriction Project Advisory Board, External Advisory Committee for the UCLA Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center; FAO/WHO Joint Expert Committee on Fats and Oils in Human Nutrition; Editorial Board of the Journal of Nutrition, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the Journal of

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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations Nutritional Biochemistry, and the Journal of Experimental Biology and Medicine; NIA, NIH, USDA, and industry grant review Study Sections member. Dr. Meydani received her Ph.D. in nutrition from Iowa State University and her D.V.M. from Tehran University. Her many honors include the American Aging Association Denham Harman Lifetime Research Achievement Award, American Society for Nutritional Sciences Lederle Award in Human Nutrition Research, American College of Nutrition Grace Goldsmith Award, and the Welcome Visiting Professorship at Iowa State University. She also received the HERMES Vitamin Research Award, the Nutritional Immunology Group Award and the Tufts University Outstanding Faculty Award. Dr. Meydani’s scientific interests include basic biology of aging as it is related to immune response; nutrition and aging; the impact of nutrition on immune response and resistance to infectious diseases in developed and developing countries; micronutrients, antioxidants, and lipids. Scott J. Montain, Ph.D., is a Research Physiologist working in the Military Nutrition Division at the US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM). He manages the Military Operational Medicine research effort to nutritionally optimize future assault rations and his research has included assessment of the physiological consequences of military sustained operations. Dr. Montain received M.S. from Ball State University and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin, before completing postdoctoral training at USARIEM. He is author or co-author on over 75 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and reports. Dr. Montain is a member of the American American Physiological Society and a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. Dennis Passe, Ph.D., is an experimental psychologist specializing in sensory measurement, research design and statistics, and learning and behavior. As former Senior Principal Scientist and head of the Sensory Research & Evaluation Department at the Gatorade Sports Science Institute in Barrington, Illinois, Passe was responsible for the sensory taste panels for Gatorade and all of the other food products made by Quaker Foods and Beverages. He also helped to identify sensory research initiatives to further our understanding of the importance of taste in voluntary fluid intake, and to broaden the use of sensory and psychological measurements during exercise to better understand feelings of well-being, vigor, and energy. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Wisconsin State University at LaCrosse, his mater’s degree from Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, and his doctoral degree in psychology from Florida State University (FSU) in Tallahassee. After completing his doctorate, Passe accepted a postdoctoral fellowship at FSU, where he did behavioral psychophysics in taste with dogs. Dr. Passe has published in the human and animal literature in the taste and olfaction areas. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, American College of Sports Medicine, American Society for Testing and Materials (Division E18-Sensory) and the Institute of Food Technologists (Sensory Division).

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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations Ronenn Roubenoff, M.D., received his M.D. from Northwestern University, trained in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and completed a concurrent fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health during his Rheumatology fellowship. He then trained in nutrition at Tufts University, and currently focuses his research on the interactions of nutrition, exercise and hormonal and immune regulators of metabolism in chronic disease and aging. He has conducted research on the effects of inflammation, diet and exercise on body composition, strength, and function in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, HIV infection, and aging. He was Chief of the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory from 1997 to 2002, and Director of Human Studies, at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University from 2001 to 2002. He is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Professor of Nutrition (both Adjunct) at Tufts and continues to practice rheumatology and nutrition at Tufts-New England Medical Center. In September, 2002, Dr. Roubenoff became Senior Director of Molecular Medicine at Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Susan Shirreffs, Ph.D., completed here first degree in Physiology at Aberdeen University in 1993. Following this she completed a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology in the area of Post-exercise Rehydration in 1996. After lecturing for 5 years at Aberdeen University, during which time Dr. Shirreffs spent a few months working at the Copenhagen Muscle Research Institute, she moved to Loughborough University to continue her research and teaching interests. Dr. Shirreffs research interests are in sport and exercise physiology and nutrition. Her current research projects focus on exercise in the heat and in particular, recovery from sweat volume and electrolyte losses. Dr. Shirreffs is a member of The Physiological Society, The American College of Sports Medicine, The Nutrition Society, the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences and The Medical Research Society. Joanne L. Slavin, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Minnesota. Her laboratory is actively involved in research on dietary fiber, phytochemicals in flax, soy, grape extract, and whole grains. She is the author of more than 100 scientific publications and numerous book chapters and review articles and has given hundreds of nutrition seminars for professional and lay audiences. She is a Science Communicator for the Institute of Food Technologists and a member of numerous scientific societies, including the American Dietetic Association, the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, and the American Association for Cancer Research. She is a frequent source for the media on topics ranging from functional foods to sports nutrition. Dr. Slavin received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is a registered dietitian.

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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations Richard J. Stubbs, Ph.D., is the head of the Human Appetite and Energy Balance Program at the Rowett Research Institute in Scotland, United Kingdom. He received his Ph.D. from Cambridge University. Previously Dr. Stubbs had a Glaxo Junior Research Fellowship. He is a Principle Scientific Officer at the Rowett and has over 15 years experience in designing, coordination, and writing up large scale human trials and interventions. Dr. Stubbs has organized numerous scientific meetings and symposia for The Nutrition Society and is well versed in delivering contract research to government agencies and industry alike. He has now conducted over 50 studies at the Rowett on aspects of feeding behavior, appetite control, diet composition and energy balance. Initial work focused on testing models of human intake regulation. More recently he has been concerned with understanding the physiological and psychological responses to induced energy deficits (diet and exercise), detecting and modeling mis-reporting of dietary intakes as a prelude to the accurate modeling of the dietary and phenotypic determinants of energy balance. Currently Dr. Stubbs is working on defining the basis of susceptibility and resistance to diet induced obesity. In research Dr. Stubbs specializes in large multidisciplinary projects involving simultaneous measures of feeding behavior in the context of energy balance. His projects typically involve several human intervention studies conducted in a structured manner. Dr. Stubbs therefore has considerable experience in co-coordinating large-scale, complex human projects as contracts that are bound by time and constrained by budget. Dr. Stubbs has been awarded several times for his achievements in energy balance and obesity research. He is an honorary Senior Research Fellow of Leeds University. Kevin D. Tipton, Ph.D., is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences at The University of Birmingham in Birmingham, England. Prior to that, he was assistant professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. Dr. Tipton’s research has focused on the interaction of nutrition and exercise on muscle protein metabolism in humans. He has been Principal Investigator on projects funded by NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, the Gatorade Sports Science Institute and the National Dairy Council. Dr. Tipton received his undergraduate degree from the University of Kentucky, Lexington, in zoology in 1983. He received his Masters of Science degree from the University of South Florida in 1987 in marine biology and his doctorate in nutrition from Auburn University, Alabama. Maret G. Traber, Ph.D., is a Principle Investigator at the Linus Pauling Institute in Oregon State University. She is also a professor in the department of Nutrition and Food Management and adjunct professor in the department of Exercise Sports Science at Oregon State University. Recently Dr. Traber became clinical professor in the department of Medicine at the Oregon Health and Science University. She serves as the associate editor of the journal Lipids, is on

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Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations the editorial boards of both the Journal of Nutrition and Free Radical Biology and Medicine. Dr. Traber is a member of the National Institutes of Health, Integrative Nutrition and Metabolic Processes Study Section. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of California in nutrition. Steven M. Wood, Ph.D., is a Senior Research Scientist at Ross Products Division/Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio. He conducts and coordinates clinical studies regarding nutritional formulations and their influence on immune function as well as oxidative stress. For the past several years he has worked closely with scientist from the United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM), Natick, Massachusetts, Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, California, and the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, to conduct studies of soldiers participating in Special Forces Selection and Assessment School, Ranger Training and Marine Mountain Warfare Training. He has also been involved in studies examining the effects of nutritional formulations on immune function in the elderly. He received his Ph.D. in nutritional sciences at the University of Arizona where he studied the relationship of nutrition (b-carotene and selenium) with immune function. Andrew J. Young, Ph.D., is a research physiologist and Chief of the Military Nutrition Division at the US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) in Natick, Massachusetts. He also is appointed Adjunct Associate Professor in the Sargent College of Allied Health Professions at Boston University. He obtained his B.S. in Biology and Commission in the US Army at the Virginia Military Institute, and his Ph.D. in Physiology at the North Carolina State University. Following graduate school, Dr. Young served in the US Army with assignments at USARIEM and at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. After leaving active duty, Dr. Young continued government service as a civilian scientist at USARIEM. Dr. Young’s research has concerned the biological basis for, and strategies to mitigate, physical performance degradations in military personnel exposed to physiological stressors such as intense physical exertion coupled with sleep restriction, nutritional deprivation and exposure to extremes of heat, cold and high altitude, all of which could be expected during continuous or sustained military operations. Dr. Young is a graduate of the Command and General Staff Officer’s Course, and has been awarded the Army Commendation Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Department of the Army Achievement Medal for Civilian Service, and the Expert Field Medical Badge. He is a member of the American Physiological Society, a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.