D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

John W. Erdman, Jr., Ph.D., (Chair) is a professor of nutrition and food science in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and a professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the effects of food processing on nutrient retention, the metabolic roles of lycopene and beta-carotene, and the bioavailability of minerals from foods. His research regarding soy protein has extended into studies on the impact of non-nutrient components of foods such as phytoestrogens on chronic disease. Dr. Erdman has published over 140 peer-reviewed research papers. He chaired the 1988 Gordon Conference on Carotenoids, and has served as a Burroughs Wellcome Visiting Professor in Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Georgia, and the G. Malcolm Trout Visiting Scholar at Michigan State University. His awards include the Borden Award from the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and the Babcock-Hart Award from the Institute of Food Technologists. Dr. Erdman has served on many editorial boards, and he has served as president of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and on various committees of the Institute of Food Technologists and the National Academy of Sciences. He was elected a fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists and the American Heart Association. Dr Erdman was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2003. Dr. Erdman received his M.S. and Ph.D. in food science from Rutgers University.


Bruce R. Bistrian, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Clinical Nutrition, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Formerly he was co-director of Hyperalimentation Services, New England Deaconess Hospital, and a lecturer in the Department of Nutrition and Food



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 431
Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff John W. Erdman, Jr., Ph.D., (Chair) is a professor of nutrition and food science in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and a professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the effects of food processing on nutrient retention, the metabolic roles of lycopene and beta-carotene, and the bioavailability of minerals from foods. His research regarding soy protein has extended into studies on the impact of non-nutrient components of foods such as phytoestrogens on chronic disease. Dr. Erdman has published over 140 peer-reviewed research papers. He chaired the 1988 Gordon Conference on Carotenoids, and has served as a Burroughs Wellcome Visiting Professor in Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Georgia, and the G. Malcolm Trout Visiting Scholar at Michigan State University. His awards include the Borden Award from the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and the Babcock-Hart Award from the Institute of Food Technologists. Dr. Erdman has served on many editorial boards, and he has served as president of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and on various committees of the Institute of Food Technologists and the National Academy of Sciences. He was elected a fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists and the American Heart Association. Dr Erdman was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2003. Dr. Erdman received his M.S. and Ph.D. in food science from Rutgers University. Bruce R. Bistrian, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Clinical Nutrition, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Formerly he was co-director of Hyperalimentation Services, New England Deaconess Hospital, and a lecturer in the Department of Nutrition and Food

OCR for page 431
Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He earned his M.D. from Cornell University, his M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University, and his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism from MIT. Dr. Bistrian is board certified in Internal Medicine and Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Bistrian’s primary research interests include nutritional assessment, metabolic effects of acute infections, nutritional support of hospitalized patients, and the pathophysiology of protein-calorie malnutrition. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, and has received an honorary M.A. from Harvard University. Dr. Bistrian is the 2004 recipient of the Goldberger Award of the American Medical Association. Dr. Bistrian has been president of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, President of the American Society of Clinical Nutrition, and is President-Elect of the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology. Dr. Bistrian has served on the editorial boards of numerous nutrition and medical journals, and is the author or co-author of over 400 articles in scientific publications. Priscilla M. Clarkson, Ph.D., is a professor of exercise science and Associate Dean of the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She served as President of the New England Regional American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Chapter, Vice-president of the National ACSM, President of the National ACSM, and President of the ACSM Foundation. Professor Clarkson has published over 150 scientific articles and has given numerous national and international scientific presentations. The major focus of her research is on how human skeletal muscle responds to environmental challenges such as over-exertion exercise and disuse. She has also published in the area of sport nutrition. Professor Clarkson served as the Editor for the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism for 8 years, and is the 2005 Editor-in-Chief of Exercise and Sport Science Reviews. Professor Clarkson has served as a scientific advisor to the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), as a member of the Science Working Group at NASA to develop laboratories for Space Station, as a scientific advisor to the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, on the Research Review Board of the Gatorade Sports Science Institute, and as a member of the NCAA Competitive and Medical Safeguards Committee. Johanna T. Dwyer, D.Sc., R.D., is director of the Frances Stern Nutrition Center at New England Medical Center and is a professor in the departments of Medicine and of Community Health at the Tufts Medical School and the School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. She is also a senior scientist at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. She is currently on part-time assignment to the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Dr. Dwyer’s work centers on life-cycle related concerns such as the prevention of diet-related disease in children and adolescents and maximization of quality of life and health in the elderly. Dr. Dwyer is currently

OCR for page 431
Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations the editor of Nutrition Today and on the editorial boards of Family Economics and Nutrition Reviews. She received her D.Sc. and M.Sc. from the Harvard School of Public Health, her M.S. from the University of Wisconsin, and completed her undergraduate degree with distinction from Cornell University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Technical Advisory Committee of the Nutrition Screening Initiative, past president of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, past secretary of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, and past president of the Society for Nutrition Education. Barbara P. Klein, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus of Foods and Nutrition in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, and co-Director, Illinois Center for Soy Foods, University of Illinois. Dr. Klein’s research addresses alterations in food quality that occur during storage, processing, and preparing foods for human consumption. Her research is focused on sensory evaluation methodology development and assessment, emphasizing reduced-sodium and low-fat foods; development and evaluation of high soy protein foods such as snacks, cereals, and dairy analogs; and factors affecting phytochemical and nutrient retention in vegetables. Dr. Klein received her B.S. (1957) and M.S. (1959) degrees from Cornell University. She completed her Ph.D. in 1974 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and then joined the faculty in the Division of Foods and Nutrition. Dr. Klein is editor of two books, author of seven book chapters, and over 100 journal articles and presentations. She received the Borden Award for Research in Foods and Nutrition in 1988, was elected as a Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists in 1994, and received the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences’ Paul A. Funk Award for Excellence in 1997. Helen W. Lane, Ph.D., R.D., is the chief nutritionist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and chief scientist for the Johnson Space Center’s Habitability, Environmental Factors, and Bioastronautics Office. She has served as the assistant to the Director for Advanced Program Coordination and Research and branch chief for Biomedical Operations and Countermeasures. Dr. Lane was an associate professor of nutrition at the University of Texas Medical Center from 1977 to 1984, and a professor of nutrition at Auburn University from 1984 to 1989. At present, she serves as an adjunct professor, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. She has led efforts to define nutritional requirements for healthy crew members during spaceflight. Dr. Lane has completed research on body composition and on nutritional requirements for energy, water, electrolytes, protein, calcium, and iron, as well as clinical and basic research on selenium and breast cancer. As a registered dietitian, she is active in the American Dietetic Association. She is also a member of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and the American Society for Clinical Nutrition.

OCR for page 431
Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations Melinda M. Manore, Ph.D., is a professor and chair, Department of Nutrition, Oregon State University, and is a registered dietitian. Her research interests include the interaction of nutrition and exercise in health, exercise performance, disease prevention, and reduction of chronic disease across the life cycle. Dr. Manore’s research also focuses on factors regulating energy balance (i.e., energy expenditure, eating behaviors, and body weight and composition), and the role of nutrition, exercise, and energy balance on the reproductive cycle. She is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and a member of American Dietetic Association (ADA), the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, and the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. She is currently chair of the ADA Nutrition Research Practice Group and received the ADA’s Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutritionists Excellence in Practice award in 2001. Dr. Manore currently serves as a member of the USA Gymnastics National Health Advisory Board, the Gatorade Sport Science Institute Nutrition Board, and the Arizona Osteoporosis Coalition Medical Advisory Board. She is associate editor for Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise and ACSM’s Health and Fitness Journal and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, and the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. Dr. Manore obtained her M.S. in health education and community health from the University of Oregon and her Ph.D. in human nutrition from Oregon State University. Patrick M. O’Neil, Ph.D., is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina, where he is also Director of the Weight Management Center. Dr. O’Neil has been involved in the study of obesity and its management since 1977, including clinical trials, basic research, teaching and public education. He has been the principal investigator on a number of clinical trials of weight-loss agents. He is the author of over 100 professional publications primarily concerning psychological, behavioral, and other clinical aspects of obesity and its management. Dr. O’Neil has served on the Education Committee of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity (NAASO) since 1994, and was a member of the NAASO Ad Hoc Committee for Development of the Practical Guidelines. He is also immediate Past President of the South Carolina Academy of Professional Psychologists, former member and Chair of the South Carolina Board of Examiners in Psychology, and former Chair of the Obesity and Eating Disorders Special Interest Group of the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy. Dr. O’Neil received his B.S. in economics from Louisiana State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Georgia. Robert M. Russell, M.D., is a professor of medicine and nutrition at Tufts University and director of the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research

OCR for page 431
Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. As a senior scientist at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Dr. Russell’s primary work involves studying the effects of aging on gastrointestinal absorptive function. He is a noted expert in the area of human metabolism of retinoids and carotenoids. Dr. Russell is a member of numerous professional societies and has served as a councilor and president to the American Society for Clinical Nutrition and a member of the Board of Directors of the American College of Nutrition. Dr. Russell co-authored the standards for parenteral and enteral nutrition to be used in U.S. long-term care facilities. He has served on the editorial boards of five professional journals and is a staff gastroenterologist at the New England Medical Center Hospitals. He has served on national and international advisory boards including the FDA, National Digestive Diseases Advisory Board, USDA Human Investigation Committee (chairman), US Pharmacopoeia Convention, National Dairy Council Scientific Advisory Board, and the American Board of Internal Medicine. He received his B.S. from Harvard University and M.D. from Columbia University. Beverly J. Tepper, Ph.D., is a professor of food science at Cook College, Rutgers University. Her primary areas of research examine the role of taste genetics on eating behavior and obesity and the effects of disease (especially diabetes) on taste, food ingestion and dietary compliance. She has published more than 50 papers and book chapters in these areas. She currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Sensory Studies and Food Quality and Preference and has served as a reviewer for the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Appetite, Brain Research Bulletin, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Journal of Food Science, Nutrition Research, and Physiology and Behavior. Dr. Tepper earned her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nutrition from Tufts University. Kevin D. Tipton, Ph.D., is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences at The University of Birmingham in Birmingham, England. Dr. Tipton’s research has focused on the interaction of nutrition and exercise on muscle protein metabolism in humans. He has been Principal Investigator on projects funded by NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, the Gatorade Sports Science Institute and the National Dairy Council. Dr. Tipton received his undergraduate degree from the University of Kentucky, Lexington, in zoology in 1983. He received his Masters of Science degree from the University of South Florida in 1987 in marine biology and his doctorate in nutrition from Auburn University, Alabama. Allison A. Yates, Ph.D., R.D., is the director of nutritional sciences at ENVIRON Health Sciences Institute in Arlington, Virginia. Prior to assuming this position, she served as the Director of the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) with the

OCR for page 431
Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations Institute of Medicine of the National Academies from l994 through September 2003 and as Dean of the College Health and Human Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg from 1988 through 1997. She is a registered dietitian, having completed a masters of science degree in public health at the University of California at Los Angeles and a dietetic internship at the Los Angeles Veteran’s Administration Hospital prior to working for the Los Angeles County Department of Health as a public health nutritionist. She earned a doctorate in human nutrition from the University of California at Berkeley, did postdoctoral work there on human sulfur amino acid requirements, and has since served as a faculty member in nutrition and dietetics at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston and at Emory University. She has conducted research on essential fatty acid and vitamin E deficiencies in animal models, soy protein utilization and methionine and sulfur requirements in men, and protein and energy requirements in older men and women. Prior to joining the staff of the FNB, she was a member of FNB Committee on Military Nutrition Research. INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE STAFF Maria P. Oria, Ph.D., is the study director for the Committee on Military Nutrition Research and its related committees. She is also the director of the Food Forum, an Institute of Medicine activity by which expert members from the various sectors dialogue about issues of concern in food and nutrition areas. She joined the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) of the Institute of Medicine in February 2002. Her work with the FNB has included serving as program officer for Scientific Criteria to Ensure Safe Food and as study director for Infant Formula: Evaluating the Safety of New Ingredients, and for Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance. Prior to joining the National Academies she was a staff scientist for the Institute of Food Technologists, coordinating projects on food safety and human nutrition under a contract with the Food and Drug Administration. She received her B.S. in biology from the University of Navarra (Spain), her M.S. in animal science from the University of Wyoming, and her Ph.D. in food science and nutrition from Purdue University. Her research interests include the cross-cutting areas between food production and food safety/quality and the impact of food production systems in the environment. Jon Q. Sanders, B.A., is a senior program assistant with the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. Since joining the National Academies in 2001, Mr. Sanders has worked on a variety of studies ranging from Everglades restoration to review of the WIC food packages. He is currently working on two FNB studies—the first is assessing the progress in childhood obesity prevention efforts at local, state, and national levels based on the recommendations of the IOM report Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance (2005), and

OCR for page 431
Nutrient Composition of Rations for Short-Term, High-Intensity Combat Operations the second is a military nutrition study to asses the mineral requirements for cognitive and physical performance of military personnel. Mr. Sanders received his B.A. degree in anthropology from Trinity University, and is currently working towards his M.S. degree in environmental sciences and policy at Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the Society for Applied Anthropology and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. He is coauthor of Sitting Down at the Table: Mediation and Resolution of Water Conflicts (2001). Mr. Sanders’ research interests include political ecology and environmental decision making. Leslie J. Sim, B.S., is a research associate at the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and also provides Web support for all of the FNB activities. In 2003, she received recognition within the FNB as a recipient of an IOM inspirational staff award. Leslie has previously worked both as a teaching assistant and laboratory assistant for an undergraduate Food Science Laboratory class. She is currently working on two IOM studies—the first is examining the effects of food marketing on the diets and health of children and youth, and the second is a military nutrition study to determine if modifications are needed in the military ration composition to prevent possible adverse health and performance consequences of consuming such rations while in short-term high-stress situations. Previously, she has worked on other military nutrition reports including: Caffeine for the Sustainment of Mental Task Performance, High-Energy, Nutrient-Dense Emergency Relief Food Product; Weight Management: State of the Science and Opportunities for Military Programs;and Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance. Leslie also provided research support for the IOM reports, Infant Formula: Evaluating the Safety of New Ingredients and Dietary Reference Intakes: Applications in Dietary Planning. She received her B.S. in biology with an emphasis on food science from Virginia Tech and attended North Carolina State University taking graduate classes in food science.