Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Lonnie J. King, Chair, is the Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University and the Director of the Office of Strategy and Innovation at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. King previously held various positions in the government, as Administrator of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Associate Administrator and Deputy Administrator for USDA/ APHIS/Veterinary Services. Before his government career, Dr. King was a private practitioner and had experience as a field veterinary medical officer, station epidemiologist, and staff assignments involving Emergency Programs and Animal Health Information. Dr. King directed the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Office of Governmental Relations and is certified in the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine. He is the past President of the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges, current President of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society, and has served as Co-Chair for both the National Alliance for Food Safety and the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues. He is the Lead Dean at Michigan State University for food safety with responsibility for the National Food Safety and Toxicology Center. He is also codeveloper and course leader for Science, Politics, and Animal Health Policy. Dr. King received his B.S. and D.V.M. degrees from Ohio State University, and his M.S. degree in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota. He also attended the Senior Executive Program at Howard University and received a M.P.A. from American University. Dr. King was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2004. He has served on the NRC Committee on Ensuring Safe Food from Production to Consumption, the Com-



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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Lonnie J. King, Chair, is the Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University and the Director of the Office of Strategy and Innovation at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. King previously held various positions in the government, as Administrator of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Associate Administrator and Deputy Administrator for USDA/ APHIS/Veterinary Services. Before his government career, Dr. King was a private practitioner and had experience as a field veterinary medical officer, station epidemiologist, and staff assignments involving Emergency Programs and Animal Health Information. Dr. King directed the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Office of Governmental Relations and is certified in the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine. He is the past President of the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges, current President of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society, and has served as Co-Chair for both the National Alliance for Food Safety and the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues. He is the Lead Dean at Michigan State University for food safety with responsibility for the National Food Safety and Toxicology Center. He is also codeveloper and course leader for Science, Politics, and Animal Health Policy. Dr. King received his B.S. and D.V.M. degrees from Ohio State University, and his M.S. degree in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota. He also attended the Senior Executive Program at Howard University and received a M.P.A. from American University. Dr. King was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2004. He has served on the NRC Committee on Ensuring Safe Food from Production to Consumption, the Com-

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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases mittee on Opportunities in Agriculture, and the Steering Committee for a Workshop on the Control and Prevention of Animal Diseases. Margaret Hamburg, Co-Chair, is Vice President for Biological Programs at the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI). Dr. Hamburg is a physician and expert in public health and bioterrorism. Before joining NTI, Dr. Hamburg was assistant secretary for planning and evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Hamburg was the commissioner of health for the City of New York and former assistant director of the Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the New York Academy of Medicine, the Council on Foreign Relations, and a fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science. Dr. Hamburg is currently serving on several committees at the National Academies, including the Roundtable on Scientific Communication and National Security, the Committee on International Security and Arms Control, and the Working Group on Biological Weapons Control (Chair), and as a member of the Board on Global Health. She previously served on the committee on Science and Technology for Countering Terrorism and the Committee on Emerging Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century. Sharon Anderson is currently Director of the North Dakota State University Extension Service located in Fargo. Dr. Anderson assumed that role in January 1995. Her previous experience with the NDSU Extension Service, which began in 1970, includes serving as a district director, program leader for youth and family, 4-H youth development specialist, and family and consumer science specialist. Dr. Anderson received her Ph.D. from the University of North Dakota in higher education administration. Dr. Anderson served on the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy from 1996 to 1999 and was chair in 1999. She has been on the National 4-H Council Board of Trustees since 1997 and completed a term as vice chair in 2002. Corrie Brown is a Professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia. Her research interests include pathogenesis of infectious disease in food-producing animals through the use of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. She is active in the fields of emerging diseases and international veterinary medicine and currently serves as Coordinator of Activities for the College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Brown completed a D.V.M. (University of Guelph), followed by a Ph.D. (University of California at Davis) in veterinary pathology, specializing in infectious diseases. Prior to joining University of Georgia in 1996, she worked at the USDA Plum Island Foreign Animal Disease Cen-

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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases ter for 10 years, conducting pathogenesis and control studies on many of the foreign animal diseases. Her bench research interests at University of Georgia have been focused on poultry diseases, and she works closely with the USDA facility in Athens that is dedicated to foreign diseases of poultry. In educational research, she has several grants to help promote awareness of foreign animal diseases and global issues in veterinary curricula and beyond. Dr. Brown is currently serves on the Committee on Genomics Databases for Bioterrorism Threat Agents: Striking a Balance for Information Sharing. Tim Herrman is a Professor at Texas A&M University where he serves as State Chemist and Director, Office of the Texas State Chemist. Prior to assuming this responsibility in December 2004, Dr. Hermman was a Professor in the Department of Grain Science and Industry at Kansas State University, where he served as the Extension State Leader and Director of Graduate Studies. He chaired the American Feed Industry Association’s Quality Council in 2004 and is on the executive committee of two national research projects that address food safety, security, and marketing. Dr. Herrman has published numerous articles and extension bulletins and runs a nationally recognized research program. Before pursuing his Ph.D., he worked 5 years with Anheuser-Busch Inc. as the coordinator of field operations, purchasing potatoes and barley in the western United States. Dr. Herrman received his bachelor’s degree in agronomy at Washington State University and his master’s degree in plant pathology and doctorate in plant science at the University of Idaho. Sharon K. Hietala is a professor of clinical diagnostic immunology with the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, and has a joint appointment in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Medicine and Epidemiology at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Hietala earned a bachelor’s degree in bacteriology in 1976, and a Ph.D. in comparative pathology in 1987, both from UC Davis. Sharon joined the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory in 1989, where she is responsible for the immunology and biotechnology services in the five-laboratory system. Her professional interests include serology, molecular diagnostics, and diagnostic epidemiology. She serves on the USDA National Surveillance System Steering Committee and is active in the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, the U.S. Animal Health Association, and a variety of food animal and poultry industry issue and interest groups. Helen H. Jensen is Professor of Economics and Division Head of Food and Nutrition Policy Research in the Center for Agricultural and Rural

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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases Development at Iowa State University. Her current research focuses on food and nutrition programs and policies, issues related to food security and safety, including the economics of food safety, food systems and hazard control options, and animal diseases. Dr. Jensen currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Agricultural Economics and has been an active member of the American Agricultural Economics Association, where she has chaired several working committees. She was a member of the National Research Council’s Panel on Animal Health and Veterinary Medicine from 1995 to 1998, and a member of the Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals. She currently serves on the Committee on National Statistics’ Panel to Review USDA’s Measurement of Food Insecurity and Hunger, and she recently served on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee to Review the WIC Food Packages. She joined the faculty at Iowa State in 1985 and holds a Ph.D. degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Wisconsin. Carol A. Keiser is president of C-BAR Cattle Company, Inc., where she established and manages operations for the feeding of 5,000 head of cattle in feedlots in Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, and Western Illinois. Prior to C-BAR Cattle Company, she developed health and well-being procedures for Loveless Feedlot. She is a Certified Livestock Manager, Certified Livestock Dealer and was elected to the Board of Directors of the Council of Food and Agricultural Research (C-FAR). She is the past Chair of UIAA University of Illinois Alumni Association and Board of UIUC Agriculture, Consumer and Environmental Sciences Alumni Board. She is a graduate of the University of Illinois in Animal Science and a professional member of the American Society of Animal Science and American Meat Science Association. Currently, Ms. Keiser represents food animal commodity producers on the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board. Additionally, she serves as Chair of the Farm Foundation, Roundtable Steering Committee. Scott R. Lillibridge is Professor of Epidemiology and Director, Center for Biosecurity and Public Health Preparedness at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Most recently, he worked as Special Assistant for National Security and Emergency Management for the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services and assisted in the development of a national bioterrorism program at HHS during a time when the nation was experiencing anthrax attacks in October 2001. Previously, he developed and was the founding Director of the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) starting in 1998. This office was charged with enhancing state and local capacities to respond to bioterrorism. In addition

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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases to infectious disease concerns, other CDC efforts in support of this program included consideration for chemical terrorism, a national pharmaceutical stockpile, health communication, training and national lab enhancement. His career at CDC focused on emergency public health response issues. He was the lead physician during the initial United States Public Health Service (PHS) response to the Oklahoma City bombing and also led the U.S. Medical Delegation to Tokyo following the sarin release in 1995. During the 1996 Olympics, he served as the HHS Science Advisor to the multiagency task force that was assembled to protect the public against biological and chemical terrorism. He has worked in emergency response and preparedness roles throughout the world in support of the United States government and nongovernmental organizations. Dr. Lillibridge was recently appointed by President George W. Bush to the White House Emergency Services, Law Enforcement, and Public Health and Hospitals Senior Advisory Committee for Homeland Security. Dr. Lillibridge earned his B.S. form East Tennessee State University and his M.D. from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine. Terry McElwain is the Executive Director of the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Director of the Animal Health Research Center in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University. He is Past President of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians and has been a key architect in the creation and development of the National Animal Health Laboratory Network. He interacts frequently with the Centers for Disease Control and is also a member of the governor’s emergency preparedness task force in the state of Washington. Dr. McElwain has a long and established research record in the field of veterinary infectious diseases, especially those of agricultural animals. He received his D.V.M. from the College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, in 1980, and his Ph.D. from Washington State University in 1986. N. Ole Nielsen, a professor emeritus and former dean of the Ontario Veterinary College (1985-94) and the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, has particular interests in comparative medicine and ecosystem health. He attended the University of Toronto, receiving his D.V.M. in 1956, and the University of Minnesota, where he received his Ph.D. in veterinary pathology in 1963. He joined the University of Saskatchewan in 1964 and subsequently became Dean of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (1974-1982). He has served on the Boards of a number of research agencies including; the Veterinary Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO), University of Saskatchewan; Cana-

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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases dian Centre for Toxicology; Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies (ACUNS); International Laboratory for Research on Animal Disease (ILRAD), Nairobi; and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Nairobi. His interests in environmental issues and the development of the concept of ecosystem health are reflected in: service as chair of the Saskatchewan Environmental Advisory Council, (1978-1982); symposia planning for the International Society for Ecosystem Health (ISEH) in Ottawa (1994), Copenhagen (1996), Sacramento (1999); promoting research in agroecosystem health at the University of Guelph; and involvement in the Ecosystem Approaches to Human Health program of the International Development Research Centre. He was president of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association in 1969. Dr. Nielsen currently serves on the National Research Council’s Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Robert A. Norton is a Professor at Auburn University. A microbiologist by training, he was educated at Southern Illinois University, where he received his B.S. and M.S. Dr. Norton served in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps and later with the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick, Maryland, where he worked on projects including the development of novel vaccines for botulism and other bacterial pathogens. After his service, Dr. Norton moved to the University of Arkansas, where he earned a Ph.D. in Veterinary Bacteriology. He has been a member of the faculty at Auburn since 1995. He presently serves as research leader in the Poultry Microbiology and Parasitology Laboratory and conducts research on bacterial diseases in animals. Dr. Norton also works on the issues of agricultural bioterrorism defense and currently serves as the editor for Issues in Ag-Security, a monthly e-mail newsletter that is sent to subscribers in government and industry. Michael T. Osterholm is the Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) at the University of Minnesota, where he is also Professor, School of Public Health. He is also serves as the Associate Director of the Department of Homeland Security’s National Center for Food Protection and Defense and was recently appointed to the newly created National Science Advisory Board on Biosecurity. Previously, Dr. Osterholm was the state epidemiologist and Chief of the Acute Disease Epidemiology Section for the Minnesota Department of Health. Following the September 11 terrorist attacks, Dr. Osterholm has served as a special advisor to the U.S. Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services on issues related to bioterrorism and public health preparedness. He has received numerous awards from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Centers for Disease Control and Preven-

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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases tion (CDC). He served as principal investigator for the CDC-sponsored Emerging Infections Program in Minnesota. He has published more than 300 articles and abstracts on various emerging infectious disease problems and is the author of best selling book Living Terrors: What America Needs to Know to Survive the Coming Bioterrorist Catastrophe. He is past president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and currently serves on the Institute’s Forum on Emerging Infections. He also served on the Committee to Ensure Safe Food from Production to Consumption. Patricia Quinlisk is a medical epidemiologist practicing at the Iowa Department of Public Health, where she functions as both the Medical Director and the State Epidemiologist. Her background includes training as a clinical microbiologist (MT[ASCP]), training microbiologists while a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nepal, a Masters of Public Health from Johns Hopkins (with a emphasis in infectious disease epidemiology), a medical degree from the University of Wisconsin, and training as a field epidemiologist in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Epidemic Intelligence Service. Every year, for the last 12 years, she has conducted weeklong epidemiologic training courses in Europe, and as a professor at the University of Iowa and Iowa State University, lectures regularly at other educational institutions around the Midwest. She serves, or has served, on several national advisory committees including the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, the Sub-Committee for Vaccine Safety and Communication, the Advisory Committee of the U.S. Marine Corps Chemical/Biological Incident Response Force, the Department of Defense’s Panel to Assess the Capabilities for Domestic Response to Terrorist Acts Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (the Gilmore Commission), and as President of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). She has testified before two Congressional Subcommittees on Public Health aspects of terrorism, and participated on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century and its Committee on the Psychological Consequences of Terrorism. Recently, she was named to the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Linda Saif is a professor and researcher with Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), working on the mechanisms in immunity against intestinal infections. Dr. Saif’s research focuses on enteric viruses, including rotaviruses, caliciviruses, and coronaviruses, which cause mortality and morbidity in both food-producing animals and humans. During the past 30 years, she has identified new intestinal viruses and developed diagnostic tests and research methods

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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases for working with them in the laboratory. Furthermore, she discovered viruses that cause intestinal diseases in livestock and developed methods for their control. Her contributions to mucosal immunology and intestinal virology have had major impacts on animal and human health research and vaccine development. She is also credited with discovering the potential of enteric viral infections in animals to infect human populations in epidemic proportions. One example is Dr. Saif’s ongoing effort to develop safe and effective vaccines for rotavirus diarrhea, which kills nearly one million children every year. Dr. Saif earned her bachelor’s degree from the College of Wooster in 1969 and received her master’s degree (1971) and doctorate (1976) in microbiology/immunology from Ohio State. She has been an OARDC faculty member since 1979, garnering more than $14 million in research grants and publishing numerous articles in books and professional journals. In 2002, Dr. Saif became the first Ohio State researcher not based on the Columbus campus to be recognized as a Distinguished University Professor, and was awarded an honorary doctorate by Belgium’s Ghent University. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences. Mark Thurmond is a professor of medicine and epidemiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis. Dr. Thurmond has 33 years of experience as a clinician and clinical epidemiologist, mainly involving dairy cattle. Dr. Thurmond’s interests relate to the epidemiology of infectious diseases of cattle and to application of epidemiological principles to prevention, control, and eradication of diseases and infections that affect animal health and productivity. Diseases of special interest include bovine viral diarrhea, neosporosis, diseases of the mammary gland, abortion, and foreign animal diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease. Research interests in epidemiologic methods relate to diagnostic epidemiology, particularly population-based diagnostic approaches, modeling, surveillance, and diagnostic screening. Dr. Thurmond received his D.V.M. from the University of California, Davis in 1972, and the M.P.V.M. from UC Davis in 1975. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1982. Kevin D. Walker is Division Director of Agricultural Health and Food Safety at the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation in Agriculture. In his role as director of one of the four technical division, he has established programs in food safety leadership, financial and technical support structures for emerging health issues, networks for developing countries to gain information on trade, emerging diseases and pathogens, tracking of international trade opportunities and constraints due to sanitary and phytosanitary health standards, and integration of country-specific food

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Animal Health at the Crossroads: Preventing, Detecting, and Diagnosing Animal Diseases safety needs with financial institutions and support agencies. Dr. Walker has also presented several analyses within the World Trade Organization on the application of sanitary and phytosanitary standards and has worked extensively with the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE) in the development of a performance, vision, and strategy instrument to enhance the modernization of national veterinary services across the world. He is formerly a director of the Center for Emerging Issues at the Animal Plant Health Inspection Service and a strategic and economic analyst at Farmland Industries, at one time the largest farmer-owned cooperative within the United States. Dr. Walker received his Ph.D. from the University of Missouri in 1985.