Appendixes



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 133
Globalization of Materials R&D: Time for a National Strategy Appendixes

OCR for page 133
Globalization of Materials R&D: Time for a National Strategy This page intentionally left blank.

OCR for page 133
Globalization of Materials R&D: Time for a National Strategy A Committee Biographies Peter Bridenbaugh, Chair, retired in 1998 from Alcoa as an executive vice president responsible for expanding the use of aluminum in automobiles and integrating Alcoa’s technical and commercial initiatives in the automotive market. He joined Alcoa in 1968 at Alcoa Laboratories, and after a number of positions was appointed executive vice president and chief technical officer in 1991, at which time he was given overall responsibility for R&D, engineering, and environment/ safety/health. In 1994, he was given direct responsibility for the automotive market. He led Alcoa Laboratories from 1983 until May 1995. Dr. Bridenbaugh received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and a master’s degree in metallurgy from Lehigh University and a Ph.D. in materials science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Bridenbaugh has served on advisory boards for several universities throughout the United States and two government laboratories. He was a double subject editor—corrosion and nonferrous metals—for the Encyclopedia of Materials: Science and Technology and served on the advisory committee for writing the history of Corning, Inc. He has chaired national conferences for the Federation of Materials Societies and the Industrial Research Institute (IRI). Dr. Bridenbaugh also served on several corporate boards, including Precision Castparts Corporation and Keystone Powdered Metal Company. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, Sigma Xi, the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME), the American Society for Metals (ASM), The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS), the Materials Research Society

OCR for page 133
Globalization of Materials R&D: Time for a National Strategy (MRS), and IRI. He has received the following honors: National Materials Advancement Award, Federation of Materials Societies; Hoyt Lecture, American Foundryman’s Society; fellow, ASM International; Zae Jeffries Lecture, ASM; Leadership Award, TMS; Alpha Sigma Mu Lecture, ASM-TMS; Andrew Carnegie Lecture, ASM; Distinguished Lecture on Materials and Society, ASM-TMS and ASM Honorary Membership-2004. Miller Adams is vice president of Boeing Technology Ventures, a unit of Boeing Technology and Boeing Phantom Works, the research and development organization of the Boeing Company. He leads a team responsible for the overall technology planning process for Boeing. He also is responsible for certain aspects of external technology acquisition strategies for Boeing, including the evaluation of external technology solutions, international industrial technology programs, strategic technology alliances, global university research collaborations, venture capital investments, and Boeing’s overall global R&D strategy. Mr. Adams also is responsible for Boeing’s internal incubator program, known as the Chairman’s Innovation Initiative, and for value-creating strategies around spin-in business opportunities built on Boeing technologies. He received a bachelor of arts degree from Seattle University and a law degree from the University of Puget Sound (now Seattle University School of Law). Ashish Arora is a professor of economics and public policy at the Heinz School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Arora’s research centers on the economics of technological change, the management of technology, intellectual property rights, and technology licensing. He has worked on the productivity of university research and the growth and development of biotechnology and the chemical industry. He is a codirector of the software industry center at Carnegie Mellon University and is studying the development of the Indian software industry and its links to the United States. Dr. Arora has published over 50 articles and coauthored two books on technology and the market economy. He is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Management and Governance and Research Policy. Professor Arora earned his Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University in 1992. Gilbert Benavides is a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff in the Manufacturing Science and Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories. He has a B.S. from the University of New Mexico and an M.S. from Stanford University, both in mechanical engineering. He has been the project leader for many R&D projects that have led to the development of new devices and novel advanced manufacturing processes. His research areas include developing and testing new

OCR for page 133
Globalization of Materials R&D: Time for a National Strategy mesomachining manufacturing processes, such as focused-ion-beam machining, machining with microtools, femtosecond laser machining, and microelectrodischarge machining. The mesomachining work won a best paper award at the 2000 Defense Manufacturing Conference. He led a project to develop a multi-degree-of-freedom silicon-based MEMS device. He just completed a project to develop a manufacture method to package electromicrofluidic devices and is developing a drop ejection system capable of patterning micron-size drops of fluids onto a substrate. Other technical development projects have led to new devices, including a hydraulic control system for reentry vehicles, an electromechanical nuclear safety component, and a down-hole seismic imaging system. Uma Chowdhry is vice president for Central Research & Development (CR&D) at DuPont. She joined DuPont in 1977 as a research scientist in CR&D at the DuPont Experimental Station. Dr. Chowdhry was elected a fellow of the American Ceramic Society in 1989. She has served on the advisory boards of engineering schools at MIT, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and the University of Delaware, as well as on the program advisory board and election subcommittee for the National Academy of Engineering. She was recently elected to the board of directors for the IRI, to the national Inventors’ Hall of Fame, and to a laboratory operations board for the U.S. Department of Energy. Dr. Chowdhry has been a member of the National Committee on Women in Science and Engineering of the National Academy of Science and the National Academy of Engineering since 1999. Born and raised in Mumbai, India, she came to the United States in 1968 with a B.S. in physics from the Indian Institute of Science, received an M.S. from Caltech in engineering science in 1970, and a Ph.D. in materials science from MIT in 1976. Edward Dowling is group director, Group Mining and Exploration for DeBeers Group Services. In this capacity he is responsible for all technical aspects of DeBeers investments in global diamond mining partnership operations, global exploration, and ongoing technological development. Prior to joining DeBeers, Dr. Dowling was executive vice president for operations with Cleveland-Cliffs, Inc., in charge of the largest North American iron producer. He has profit-and-loss responsibility for six large iron ore mining, processing, and manufacturing operations; an international reduced iron facility that employs a novel fluidized-bed reactor technology; and overall company-wide improvement efforts. Dr. Dowling has held a progression of technical and operating positions throughout his career. Prior to joining Cleveland-Cliffs, he was senior vice president and director of process management and engineering with Cyprus Amax Minerals Company, at that time the largest U.S.-based mining enterprise. While with Cyprus, he also led its subsidiaries Cli-

OCR for page 133
Globalization of Materials R&D: Time for a National Strategy max Molybdenum Company and Climax Specialty Metals and Performance Chemicals, as well as downstream copper smelting and refining operations. He is recognized in the industry for his process engineering expertise and the ability to integrate engineering theory and practice to obtain real solutions to important industrial problems. He holds a B.S. degree in mining engineering and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mineral processing, all from the Pennsylvania State University. For his contributions, Dr. Dowling has received a number of industry awards, most recently from the Extractive Processing Division of TMS (2000) and the Robert H. Richards Award from AIME (2001). He is a member of TMS, Sigma Xi, the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America, the American Iron and Steel Institute, and others. He has published more than 35 articles with an emphasis on processing engineering and technical approaches to operations and business optimization. Gordon Geiger earned his B.E. degree in metallurgy at Yale University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in metallurgy and materials science at Northwestern University. In 1973, he joined the University of Arizona as professor and head of the Department of Metallurgical Engineering. During his teaching career, he trained over 50 graduate students, collaborated in the writing of several well-known textbooks, and consulted for industry and government. After 15 years of teaching and research, Dr. Geiger returned to industry in 1980 as an internal consultant at Inland Steel and later as a vice president of Chase Manhattan Bank. From 1983 to 1993, he served as vice president and executive vice president of Cargill’s North Star Steel company. He left North Star and Cargill in 1993 to start a new company, Qualitech Steel. He now lives in Tucson, Arizona, where he consults and where he has established a B.S. program in engineering management at the University of Arizona. He is director of the program and professor of industrial and systems engineering. He is the recipient of the A.B. Campbell Award from the National Association of Corrosion Engineers, the Bradley Stoughton Award from ASM, the Leadership Award from TMS-AIME, the Charles W. Briggs Award and the Robert Woolson Hunt Award from the Iron and Steel Society (ISS) and AIME, and was a member of the U.S. delegation to the First U.S.-People’s Republic of China Metallurgical Conference. He gave the Howe Memorial Lecture for ISS-AIME in 1999 and was an Alpha Sigma Mu lecturer for ASM. He served as president of TMS-AIME, as president of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, and as president of ASM International. Jennie Hwang is president of H-Technologies Group and CEO of Asahi America, Inc. She has held senior executive positions with Lockheed Martin Corp., Sherwin Williams Co., SCM Corporation, and International Electronic Materials Corpora-

OCR for page 133
Globalization of Materials R&D: Time for a National Strategy tion. She is also an invited distinguished adjunct professor in materials science and engineering at Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Hwang’s career encompasses research management, technology transfer, international business, corporate executive positions, CEO of three start-up companies, corporate and university governance, and presidency of professional organizations. Among her many awards and honors are citations by the U.S. Congress and the Ohio Senate/House for outstanding achievement; membership in the National Academy of Engineering (1997); induction into the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame; being named a “Star to Watch” by Industry Week magazine; and induction into the Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame. She is internationally recognized as a pioneer in the miniaturization and manufacture of electronic devices and infrastructure development, particularly in materials and processes. She is the inventor of a number of patents and the author of 250 publications, including sole authorship of several internationally used textbooks. As a columnist for SMT, a globally circulated trade magazine, she addresses global market thrusts and technology issues monthly. In addition, she is a prolific author and speaker on education, workforce, social, and business issues; emerging technologies at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; and the dissemination of new technologies. She has served as an advisor to university, government, and industry. She also serves on the board of Fortune 500 NYSE-traded companies and the civic and university boards. Her formal education includes two M.S. degrees, one in chemistry and one in liquid crystal science from Columbia University and Kent State University, respectively, and a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Case Western Reserve University, where she serves as a board director. Michael Jaffe is a research professor with the New Jersey Institute of Technology in the Biomedical Engineering Department. He is also chief scientist for industrial programs and director of the Medical Device Concept Laboratory in the New Jersey Center for Biomaterials and an associate research professor at Rutgers University. His expertise is in innovative materials research, such as biomimetics, and in DOD system applications. Dr. Jaffe’s work has focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of polymers and related materials, the application of biological paradigms to materials design, and translation of new technologies to commercial reality. He was the recipient of the 1995 Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award, presented by the R&D Council of New Jersey. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. Robert Pfahl received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Cornell University, where he majored in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. He is the vice presi-

OCR for page 133
Globalization of Materials R&D: Time for a National Strategy dent of operations for the International Electronics Manufacturing Initiative (iNEMI). Before this, he was the director of international and environmental research and development at Motorola’s Advanced Technology Center, where he led Motorola’s environmental technology R&D. He was also responsible for globalizing Motorola’s Advanced Technology Center, including research centers in China and Germany. Dr. Pfahl is a member of the steering committee of the International Society of Industrial Ecology. He is also a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a member of the International Microelectronics and Packaging Society (IMAPS). He holds nine U.S. patents in electronics manufacturing technology and is the inventor of the vapor-phase soldering process. He led the U.S. electronics industry in its preparation of the 1994 and 1996 National Electronic Manufacturing Initiative Roadmaps. Dr. Pfahl chairs the National Roadmap Coordinating Committee, which coordinates U.S. electronic roadmapping activities with U.S. government activities in electronics R&D. In recognition of his efforts to eliminate the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the electronics industry, Dr. Pfahl received the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award for “executive leadership and industry organizing” in 1991. Dr. Pfahl also chaired the American Electronics Association’s CFC task force. Natalia Tamirisa is a senior economist with the International Monetary Fund, where she has worked on a range of topics in international economic policy, focusing on emerging market economies. As the holder of an M.Sc. in aerospace economics from the Moscow Aviation Institute, in Russia, Dr. Tamirisa also has a technical background in the economics and management of aerospace research and development. She received honors, scholarships, and grants for her graduate studies and an outstanding research award for her Ph.D. thesis. She was the valedictorian at the International Space University summer session in Toulouse, France, in 1991. Dr. Tamirisa has authored and coauthored publications on issues in the globalization of trade and finance, including trade and capital controls, dual-use technologies, intellectual property rights, and the environmental economics of space. Xishan Xie is a professor in the High Temperature Materials Testing and Research Laboratories at the University of Science and Technology in Beijing. He is also vice chairman of the International Affairs Committee of the Chinese Society for Metals. Dr. Xie also serves as the Chinese delegate to the International Organization of Materials, Metals, and Minerals Societies. He has participated in several Pacific Rim International Conferences on Advanced Materials and Processing. He has published nearly 200 papers in English and Chinese versions for technical journals and proceedings.