F
An Approach to Assessing Goals and Policies

In general, the appropriateness of a strategy to improve the performance of a large system can be determined by testing the proposed goals and organizational polices for consistency and compatibility with key implementation and operational factors. Although the process below may be intuitively clear, answering the questions may require a great deal of penetrating analysis.

  • Internal consistency

    • What assumptions must be made for the recommended strategy to make sense?

    • Are the goals mutually achievable?

    • Do the key policies address the goals and reinforce each other?

  • Context

    • What are the key factors for success and the important opportunities and threats?

    • Do the goals and policies adequately deal with organizational resources and trends?

      • What are the capabilities and limitations of key agencies and other organizations?

      • Do the goals and polices match resource requirements to the organizations that will have to provide the funding?

      • Does the timing of the goals and policies reflect the ability of involved organizations to change or adapt the strategy recommendations?

    • Are the goals and policies responsive to broader societal concerns?

    • Is available managerial capability sufficient to foster effective implementation?

    • What important governmental, social, and political factors affect the likelihood of success?

    • What are the feasible strategic alternatives given the analysis above?

  • Communication and implementation

    • Are the goals well understood by the key implementers?

    • Is there enough congruence between the goals, polices, and values of the key implementers to ensure commitment?

    • Strategic choice: Which alternative best relates the JPDO’s policies and goals to external opportunities and threats?



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Technology Pathways: Assessing the Integrated Plan for a Next Generation Air Transportation System F An Approach to Assessing Goals and Policies In general, the appropriateness of a strategy to improve the performance of a large system can be determined by testing the proposed goals and organizational polices for consistency and compatibility with key implementation and operational factors. Although the process below may be intuitively clear, answering the questions may require a great deal of penetrating analysis. Internal consistency What assumptions must be made for the recommended strategy to make sense? Are the goals mutually achievable? Do the key policies address the goals and reinforce each other? Context What are the key factors for success and the important opportunities and threats? Do the goals and policies adequately deal with organizational resources and trends? What are the capabilities and limitations of key agencies and other organizations? Do the goals and polices match resource requirements to the organizations that will have to provide the funding? Does the timing of the goals and policies reflect the ability of involved organizations to change or adapt the strategy recommendations? Are the goals and policies responsive to broader societal concerns? Is available managerial capability sufficient to foster effective implementation? What important governmental, social, and political factors affect the likelihood of success? What are the feasible strategic alternatives given the analysis above? Communication and implementation Are the goals well understood by the key implementers? Is there enough congruence between the goals, polices, and values of the key implementers to ensure commitment? Strategic choice: Which alternative best relates the JPDO’s policies and goals to external opportunities and threats?