ID AND VERIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 1
Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium ID AND VERIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES

OCR for page 1
Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium This page intentionally left blank.

OCR for page 1
Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium Introduction STEPHEN S. INTILLE Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, Massachusetts VISVANATHAN RAMESH Siemens Corporate Research, Inc. Princeton, New Jersey The profileration of cheaper, novel sensors, faster computers, and intelligent algorithms has made the effective monitoring, identifying, and tracking of objects and persons much more feasible. Modalities for identifying and tracking objects include: radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs), bar codes, and so on. Modalities for the biometric identification of people include facial-recognition systems, fingerprint analysis, hand-geometry analysis, iris recognition, and many others. The combination of biometrics and digital passports will enable the tracking of individuals and their whereabouts. Moreover, video surveillance systems, which are being increasingly used in public areas, will be able to detect, track, capture, and log faces of individuals and, potentially, match them to faces in databases. The presentations in this session will provide an overview of the trends and research challenges in technologies in this field. As the capability to identify, track, and monitor individuals improves, we will need safeguards against the misuse of these capabilities. Thus, privacy issues related to the deployment of these technologies will also be discussed. The presentations will focus on the following topics: (1) an overview of research challenges and face-recognition technology by Peter Belhumeur; (2) an evaluation of biometrics for face recognition by Jonathon Phillips; and (3) the practical use of RFIDs for activity recognition by Matthai Philipose.

OCR for page 1
Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium This page intentionally left blank.