IV
APPENDIXES



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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium IV APPENDIXES

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium Appendix A Biographies of Speakers* GREG BEAMS Greg Beams is a partner in Ernst & Young’s Washington, D.C. practice working within the firm’s Attest practice. Greg is in his 16th year with Ernst & Young and focuses primarily on clients within the software and Internet industries. Greg has extensive experience in dealing with software company accounting and reporting issues, both for domestic and international software companies in the public and private sector. Greg graduated from Central Washington University with B.S.s in accounting and finance and is a licensed CPA in the State of Virginia. ERNST R. BERNDT Ernst R. Berndt is the Louis B. Seley Professor of Applied Economics at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Professor Berndt also serves as Director of the National Bureau of Economic Research Program on Technological Progress and Productivity Measurement, and is Adjunct Professor of Health Care Policy and Management at the Harvard Medical School. Much of Prof. Berndt’s research *   As of February 2004.

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium focuses on the measurement and identification of factors affecting the pricing and diffusion of new technologies, such as PC hardware, PC software, and novel medical innovations. Dr. Berndt received his B.A. (Honors) degree in economics from Valparaiso University in 1968, where he was a Christ College Scholar, an M.S. (1971) and Ph.D. (1972) in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and an honorary doctorate (1991) from Uppsala University in Sweden. Currently Dr. Berndt serves as Chair of the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee, is a panel review member of the Methodology, Measurement and Statistics program at the National Science Foundation, and is on Independent Detail from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WILLIAM B. BONVILLIAN William Bonvillian is the Legislative Director and Chief Counsel to Senator Joseph I. Lieberman (D-CT). Prior to his work on Capitol Hill, he was a partner at both the law firms of Jenner & Block as well as Brown & Roady. Early in his career, he served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Director of Congressional Affairs at the U.S. Department of Transportation. His recent articles include, “Organizing Science and Technology for Homeland Security,” in Issues in Science and Technology, and “Science at a Crossroads,” published in Technology in Society. His current legislative efforts at Senator Lieberman’s office include science and technology policy and innovation issues. Mr. Bonvillian is married to Janis Ann Sposato and has two children. He received his B.A. from Columbia University; his M.A.R. from Yale University; and his J.D. from Columbia Law School where he also served on the Board of Editors for the Columbia Law Review. He is a member of the Connecticut Bar, the District of Columbia Bar, and the U.S. Supreme Court Bar. KENNETH FLAMM Kenneth Flamm is Professor and Dean Rusk Chair in International Affairs at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas-Austin. He is a 1973 honors graduate of Stanford University and received a Ph.D. in economics from MIT in 1979. From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Flamm served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Economic Security and Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Dual Use Technology Policy. Prior to and after his service at the Defense Department, he spent 11 years as a Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at Brookings. Dr. Flamm has been a professor of economics at the Instituto Tecnológico A. de México in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and George Washington University. Dr. Flamm currently directs the LBJ School’s Technology and Public Policy Program, and directs externally funded research projects on “Internet Use in

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium Developing and Industrializing Countries,” “The Economics of Fair Use,” and “Determinants of Internet Use in U.S. Households,” and has recently initiated a new project on “Exploring the Digital Divide: Regional Differences in Patterns of Internet Use in the U.S.” He continues to work with the semiconductor industry research consortium International SEMATECH, and is building a return-on-investment-based prototype to add economic logic to SEMATECH’s industry investment model. He also is a member of the National Academy of Science’s Panel on the Future of Supercomputing, and its Steering Group on Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy. He has served as member and chair of the NATO Science Committee’s Panel for Science and Technology Policy and Organization, and as a member of the Federal Networking Council Advisory Committee, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Expert Working Party on High Performance Computers and Communications, and various advisory committees and study groups of the National Science Foundation, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Defense Science Board, and the U.S. Congress’ Office of Technology Assessment, and as a consultant to government agencies, international organizations, and private corporations. Dr. Flamm is the author of numerous articles and books on the economic impacts of technological innovation in a variety of high-technology industries. Among the latter are Mismanaged Trade? Strategic Policy and the Semiconductor Industry (1996), Changing the Rules: Technological Change, International Competition, and Regulation in Communications (ed., with Robert Crandell, 1989), Creating the Computer (1988), and Targeting the Computer (1987). Recent work by Flamm has focused on measurement of the economic impact of the semiconductor industry on the U.S. economy, analyzing the economic determinants of Internet use by households, and assessing the economic impacts of Internet use in key applications. JACK HARDING Jack Harding brings 20 years of executive management experience in the electronics industry to eSilicon and serves as chairman, president, and chief executive officer (CEO). Prior to eSilicon, Mr. Harding served as President and CEO of Cadence Design Systems. During his tenure Cadence was the world’s largest supplier of electronic design software. From 1994 to 1997, Mr. Harding was President and CEO of Cooper & Chyan Technology, which was acquired by Cadence in 1997. Harding served as executive vice president of Zycad Corporation from 1984 to 1994. He began his career at IBM. Mr. Harding holds a B.A. in economics and chemistry from Drew University, where he is a vice chairman of the Board of Trustees. Harding is a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Development Strategies, and a member of the Board of Visitors for the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University. He is a member of the Council on Competitiveness, a Washington, D.C.-based organization of Fortune 500 CEOs

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium and university presidents dedicated to the global competitiveness of the United States. Mr. Harding also serves on the Board of Directors of Marimba, Incorporated. He is a frequent lecturer on innovation and entrepreneurship. RONIL HIRA Ronil Hira is an assistant professor of Public Policy at Rochester Institute of Technology. He specializes in engineering workforce issues and innovation policy. He completed his post-doctoral fellowship at Columbia University’s Center for Science, Policy, and Outcomes. Dr. Hira holds a Ph.D. in public policy from George Mason University (GMU), an M.S. in electrical engineering also from GMU, and a B.S. in electrical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. He has been a consultant for the Rand Corporation, Deloitte & Touche, and Newport News Shipbuilding. He testified before Congress on the implications of offshore outsourcing on innovation and engineering careers. Dr. Hira was previously a program manager at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He is a licensed professional engineer and is currently Chair of the Career and Workforce Policy Committee of IEEE-USA. DALE W. JORGENSON Dale Jorgenson is the Samuel W. Morris Professor of Economics at Harvard University. He has been a Professor in the Department of Economics at Harvard since 1969 and Director of the Program on Technology and Economic Policy at the Kennedy School of Government since 1984. He served as Chairman of the Department of Economics from 1994 to 1997. Dr. Jorgenson received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in 1959 and his B.A. in economics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, in 1955. Dr. Jorgenson was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 1998, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1989, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 1978, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1969. He was elected to Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1982, the American Statistical Association in 1965, and the Econometric Society in 1964. Uppsala University and the University of Oslo awarded him honorary doctorates in 1991. Dr. Jorgenson is president of the American Economic Association. He has been a member of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy of the National Research Council since 1991 and was appointed to be Chairman of the Board in 1998. He is also Chairman of Section 54, Economic Sciences, of the National Academy of Sciences. He served as President of the Econometric Society in 1987. Dr. Jorgenson is the author of more than 200 articles and the author and editor of 20 books in economics. The MIT Press, beginning in 1995, has pub-

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium lished his collected papers in 9 volumes. The most recent volume, Econometrics and Producer Behavior, was published in 2000. Prior to Dr. Jorgenson’s appointment at Harvard he was Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he taught from 1959 to 1969. He has been Visiting Professor of Economics at Stanford University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Visiting Professor of Statistics at Oxford University. He has also served as Ford Foundation Research Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago. Forty-two economists have collaborated with Dr. Jorgenson on published research. An important feature of Dr. Jorgenson’s research program has been collaboration with students in economics at Berkeley and Harvard, mainly through the supervision of doctoral research. This collaboration has often been the outgrowth of a student’s dissertation research and has led to subsequent joint publications. Many of his former students are professors at leading academic institutions in the United States and abroad and several occupy endowed chairs. MONICA LAM Monica Lam received a B.Sc. from the University of British Columbia in 1980 and a Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1987. She joined the faculty of Computer Science at Stanford in 1988, where she is now a professor. Her research interests are in systems: program analyses, operating systems, and architectures. Dr. Lam’s current research projects focus on making computing and programming easier. The Collective project she leads is developing a computing utility, based on the concept of virtual appliances, whose goals are to simplify system administration and support user mobility. Her program analysis group has recently developed a number of practical programming tools including a static memory leak detector called Clouseau, a dynamic bounds-checker called CRED, and a dynamic error detection and diagnosis tool called DIDUCE. Dr. Lam led the SUIF (Stanford University Intermediate Format) Compiler project, which produced a widely used compiler infrastructure known for its locality optimizations and interprocedural parallelization. Many of the compiler techniques she developed have been adopted by the industry. Her other research projects included the architecture and compiler for the CMU Warp machine, a systolic array of VLIW processors, and the Stanford DASH distributed shared memory machine. In 1998, she took a sabbatical leave from Stanford to help start Tensilica Inc., a company that specializes in configurable processor cores. Honors for Dr. Lam’s research work at Stanford include an NSF Young Investigator award, an ACM Most Influential Programming Language Design and Implementation Paper Award, and an ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award. She chaired the ACM SIGPLAN Programming Languages Design and Implementation Conference in 2000, served on the Editorial Board of ACM

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium Transactions on Computer Systems, and numerous conference program committees including ASPLOS, ISCA, PLDI, POPL, and SOSP. SHELLY C. LUISI Shelly Luisi is a senior associate chief accountant in the Office of the Chief Accountant (OCA) of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and co-leader of OCA’s technical accounting staff. As the SEC’s technical body on U.S. and international financial reporting matters, OCA is responsible for overseeing the activities of the Financial Accounting Standards Board and its designees, monitoring the activities of international accounting standard setters, and consulting with registrants, auditors, and SEC staff regarding complex financial reporting issues. Ms. Luisi is responsible for the processes related to interpretations of accounting standards, including oversight of the activities of the Emerging Issues Task Force, analysis of the activities of the International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee, and consultations on financial reporting issues. Prior to joining the SEC in July 2000, Ms. Luisi worked in the Atlanta and Salt Lake City offices of Ernst & Young and the Las Vegas office of KPMG, as well as in industry as Vice President, Accounting and Information Systems of an SEC registrant. Ms. Luisi earned a B.S. degree with a major in accounting in 1990 and an M.Ac. degree with a focus on information systems in 1991, both from Florida State University. She is a CPA, licensed by the state of Georgia. MARK B. MYERS Mark B. Myers is visiting executive professor in the Management Department at the Wharton Business School, the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include identifying emerging markets and technologies to enable growth in new and existing companies with special emphases on technology identification and selection, product development, and technology competencies. Mark Myers serves on the Science, Technology, and Economic Policy Board of the National Research Council and currently co-chairs with Richard Levin, the President of Yale, the National Research Council’s study of “Intellectual Property in the Knowledge Based Economy.” Dr. Myers retired from the Xerox Corporation at the beginning of 2000, after a 36-year career in its research and development organizations. Myers was the senior vice president in charge of corporate research, advanced development, systems architecture, and corporate engineering from 1992 to 2000. His responsibilities included the corporate research centers: PARC in Palo Alto, California; Webster Center for Research & Technology near Rochester, New York; Xerox Research Centre of Canada, Mississauga, Ontario; and the Xerox Research Centre of Europe in Cambridge, UK, and Grenoble, France. During this period he was a

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium member of the senior management committee in charge of the strategic direction setting of the company. Dr. Myers is chairman of the board of trustees of Earlham College and has held visiting faculty positions at the University of Rochester and at Stanford University. He holds a B.S. from Earlham College and a Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University. DIRK PILAT Dirk Pilat is a senior economist with responsibilities for work on Productivity, Growth, and Firm-level Analysis at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Directorate for Science, Technology and Industry. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, where he was also a research fellow. He joined the OECD in 1994, working on unemployment, regulatory reform, product market competition, and economic growth. In recent years, his work has focused on economic growth and issues related to the “new economy,” during which he contributed to OECD reports such as ICT and Economic Growth: Evidence from OECD Countries, Industries and Firms (2003), Seizing the Benefits of ICT in a Digital Economy (2003), The New Economy—Beyond the Hype (2001), and A New Economy? The Changing Role of Innovation and Information Technology in Growth (2000). Since 1998, he has been a member of the editorial board of OECD Economic Studies and of the Review of Income and Wealth. WILLIAM J. RADUCHEL William J. Raduchel provides strategic advice and consulting to a number of technology-related companies including America Online (AOL), Chordiant Software, where he is a director, Myriad International, Silicon Image, where he also serves as chairman of PanelLink Cinema Partners PLC, Hyperspace Communications, and Wild Tangent. Through 2002 Dr. Raduchel was executive vice president and chief technology officer of AOL Time Warner, Inc, after being senior vice president and chief technology officer of AOL. Infoworld named him CTO of the year in 2001. Dr. Raduchel joined AOL in September 1999 from Sun Microsystems, Inc, where he was chief strategy officer and a member of its executive committee. In his 11 years at Sun, he also served as chief information officer, chief financial officer, acting vice president of human resources and vice president of corporate planning and development and oversaw relationships with the major Japanese partners. He was recognized separately as CIO of the year and as best CFO in the computer industry. In addition, Dr. Raduchel has held senior executive roles at Xerox Corporation and McGraw-Hill, Inc. He is a member of the National Advisory Board for the Salvation Army, the Board of Directors of In2Books, the National Research

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium Council Committee on Internet Navigation and Domain Name Services and the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy of the National Research Council. He has several issued and pending patents. After attending Michigan Technological University, which gave him an honorary doctorate in 2002, Dr. Raduchel received his undergraduate degree in economics from Michigan State University, and earned his A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in economics at Harvard. In both the fall and spring of 2003 he was the Castle Lecturer on Computer Science at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. WAYNE ROSING Wayne Rosing brought to Google more than 30 years of engineering and research experience at some of Silicon Valley’s most respected companies. That experience in forming high-performance engineering teams has served him well at Google where he is responsible for a staff of more than 100 technical professionals working in small teams on multiple projects. Mr. Rosing joined Google from Caere Corporation, where his most recent position was chief technology officer and vice president of Engineering. Mr. Rosing managed all engineering for Caere’s optical character recognition (OCR) product lines and was the driving force behind the acquisition of the comprehensive forms application Omniform, which became one of Caere’s key products. Prior to joining Caere, Mr. Rosing served as president of FirstPerson, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Sun Microsystems. While at FirstPerson, Mr. Rosing headed the team that developed the technology base for Java. That success was preceded by his founding of Sun Microsystems Laboratories, which grew to more than 100 researchers under his leadership. Mr. Rosing worked at Sun Microsystems in various executive positions from 1985 through 1994. Earlier in his career, Mr. Rosing was director of engineering for the Apple Computer Lisa and Apple II divisions and held management positions at Digital Equipment Corporation and Data General. ANTHONY SCOTT As chief information technology officer at General Motors, Mr. Scott is responsible for defining the information technology computing and telecommunications architecture and standards across all of the company’s business globally. Mr. Scott joined General Motors from Bristol-Myers Squibb where he was vice president, Information Management for the Shared Services Group. He has also held positions as senior director, Technology Knowledge Organization with Price Waterhouse; vice president of Engineering with Uniteq Application Systems; and manager, Worldwide Information Resources with Sun Microsystems. Mr. Scott completed a B.S. degree from the University of San Francisco in information systems management and a Juris Doctorate from Santa Clara University. He, his wife, and two teenage sons are from New Jersey.

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium JAMES SOCAS James Socas currently serves on the staff of the U.S. Senate Banking Committee with responsibility for the Economic Policy Subcommittee and works closely with U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer. He has focused closely on issues relating to the “offshoring” of U.S. jobs and trade relations with China. Prior to joining the Senate staff, he was a managing director at Credit Suisse First Boston (CSFB), responsible for software industry clients and transactions, and served in a similar capacity at Donaldson Lufkin & Jenrette, before they were acquired by CSFB in 2000. Mr. Socas also served as Assistant to the President for Reston-Virginia based Perot Systems, an IT-services company, and helped start a small clinical software business. He is a passionate believer in the importance of high-tech industries to the future growth and job creation in the country. Mr. Socas is a graduate of the Harvard Business School and the University of Virginia and lives in McLean, Virginia with his wife and two children. HAL R. VARIAN Hal R. Varian is the Class of 1944 Professor at the School of Information Management and Systems, the Haas School of Business, and the Department of Economics at the University of California (UC) at Berkeley. He received his S.B. degree from MIT in 1969 and his M.A. (mathematics) and Ph.D. (economics) from UC Berkeley in 1973. He has taught at MIT, Stanford, Oxford, Michigan, and other universities around the world. Dr. Varian is a fellow of the Guggenheim Foundation, the Econometric Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as co-editor of the American Economic Review and is on the editorial boards of several journals. Professor Varian has published numerous papers in economic theory, industrial organization, financial economics, econometrics, and information economics. He is the author of two major economics textbooks which have been translated into 22 languages. His current research has been concerned with the economics of information technology and the information economy. He is the co-author of a bestselling book on business strategy, Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy, and writes a monthly column for the The New York Times. KENNETH WALKER Kenneth Walker currently serves as SonicWALL’s director of Platform Evangelism where he is engaged in the development of a security ecosystem stretching beyond individual companies to help create layered security solutions for the broader market.

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Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy: Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy - Report of a Symposium Prior to joining SonicWALL, Mr. Walker was most recently vice president of Technical Strategy for Philips Components, where he drove customer and technology innovation to deliver value across product lines. While at Philips, Walker served in a number of capacities in the display arena, managing teams on the cutting edge of LCD television and innovative display applications. Previously, Walker has held senior positions for Verano, Radius, and Apple Computer. Mr. Walker has an M.S. in management and a B.S. in information and computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology. DAVID WASSHAUSEN Dave Wasshausen is a supervisory economist with the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). He is responsible for the estimates of private fixed investment in equipment and software, and of foreign transactions in the national income and product accounts. Mr. Wasshausen co-authored and presented a paper entitled, “Information Processing Equipment and Software in the National Accounts,” at an NBER/CRIW conference on “Measuring Capital in the New Economy.” The paper is available on BEA’s web site and will be published in a forthcoming CRIW volume. Mr. Wasshausen received his M.A. in economics from The American University (1996) and his B.A. in economics from Miami University (1990). Mr. Wasshausen has been working as an economist in BEA’s national accounts directorate since 1991. ALAN G. WHITE Alan G. White is a manager at Analysis Group, Inc. in Boston, a firm of economic, financial and strategy consultants. Dr. White specializes in the application of statistics, econometrics and applied microeconomics to litigation and general business problems. He has provided quantitative economic analyses in antitrust, intellectual property and complex business litigation. His work spans a wide variety of industries, including banking, computer hardware and software, vitamins, and agricultural products. His case work has included price measurement issues in a variety of industries, the application of quality-adjusted price methods, the evaluation of market conditions pertaining to class certification in the sales of genetically modified seeds, the examination of market conditions relevant to the effective function of a price-fixing cartel, and the evaluation of the cost of employees with various chronic pain conditions to employers. Dr. White has a B.A. (Honors) in mathematics and economics and a M. Litt. in economics from the University of Dublin, Trinity College, and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of British Columbia. Dr. White’s research and publications have focused on economic measurement, including the construction of stock market indexes, and the theory and implementation of consumer and producer price indexes.