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A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff PERRY HAGENSTEIN, Ph.D., chair, is an independent consultant on natural resources policy, economics, and management. Since 1982, he has also served as president of the Institute for Forest Analysis, Planning, and Policy, a national nonprofit research and education organization. He is the former president of Resource Issues, Inc., and former executive director of the New England Natural Resources Center. He has been a visiting professor at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, University of Vermont, University of Massachusetts, and Vermont Law School. He served as Charles Bullard Research Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and Harvard Forest at Harvard Univer- sity. He was senior policy analyst for the U.S. Public Land Law Review Commis- sion. He is a national associate of The National Academies and has chaired several National Academies studies, including the Committee on Hardrock Min- ing on Federal Lands, the Subcommittee on Air Emissions from Animal Feeding Operations, the Committee on Abandoned Mine Lands, and the Committee on Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing. He has also served as a member on the Committee on Surface Mining and Reclamation, the Committee on Earth Resources, the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, the Committee on Environmental Issues in Pacific Northwest Forest Management, and the Committee on Noneconomic and Economic Value of Biodiversity. Dr. Hagenstein has a Ph.D. in forest and natural resources economics from the University of Michigan. GEORGE R. HALLBERG, Ph.D., is a principal with the Cadmus Group, Inc., in Waltham, Massachusetts, conducting environmental research, regulatory analy- sis, and management services for public-sector programs. Previously he was 203

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204 MANAGING COAL COMBUSTION RESIDUES IN MINES associate director and chief of environmental research at the University of Iowa's environmental and public health laboratory and at the Iowa Department of Natu- ral Resources. Dr. Hallberg was also an adjunct professor at both the University of Iowa and Iowa State University. He has served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology and on the Office of Water's Management Advisory Group. He has 30 years experience in research, policy and management of environmental, natu- ral resources and public health programs. His research interests include environ- mental monitoring and assessment, chemical and nutrient fate and transport, contaminant occurrence and trends in drinking water, health effects of environ- mental contaminants, and groundwater hydrogeology. Dr. Hallberg has served on the National Academies Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources and on several committees, including as chair of the Committee on Opportunities to Improve the USGS National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and as a member of the Committee on Long Range Soil and Water Conservation Policy. He is currently a member of the National Academies Committee on Assessment of Water Resources Research. Dr. Hallberg received a Ph.D. in geol- ogy from the University of Iowa. WILLIAM A. HOPKINS, Ph.D., is an associate professor, Department of Fish- eries and Wildlife Sciences at Virginia Polytechnical Institute and State Univer- sity. Until August of 2005 he was an assistant research scientist at the Savannah River Ecology Lab. Dr. Hopkins' research interests include the effects of trophic transfer of contaminants on predatory vertebrates, effects of teratogenic com- pounds on reproduction and development in ectotherms, and the indirect effects of contaminants on wildlife. Much of Dr. Hopkins' work has focused on the effects of coal combustion waste on the survival, physiology, and performance of aquatic life. He has published numerous articles and book chapters on the effects of aquatic disposal of trace elements, specifically coal combustion wastes. Dr. Hopkins received his Ph.D. in biology from the University of South Carolina. THOMAS J. O'NEIL, Ph.D., recently retired from the Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company and Cliffs Mining Company where he served as president and chief operating officer. He was responsible for five North American iron ore mines. He has experience in other mining activities ranging from coal to copper. Prior to his private-sector duties, he was professor and head of the Department of Mining and Geological Engineering at the University of Arizona. He has numerous peer- reviewed publications and has received numerous honors and awards from pro- fessional societies and universities. He was the 2003 president of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration. Dr. O'Neil is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on the National Academies Committee on Earth Resources. He received his Ph.D. in mining engineering from the Uni- versity of Arizona.

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APPENDIX A 205 CHARLES POOLE, Sc.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Epi- demiology at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health, where his work focuses on the development and application of epidemiologic research methods and principles. His areas of substantive research interest include envi- ronmental and occupational epidemiology. He served with the U.S. Environmen- tal Protection Agency, worked as an epidemiologic consultant, and taught at the Boston University School of Public Health. He has served on the editorial boards of several leading epidemiological journals. Dr. Poole has served on four previ- ous National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on Estimating the Health-Risk-Reduction Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regu- lations. He received his M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina and his Sc.D. from Harvard University. CAROL J. PTACEK, Ph.D., holds a joint appointment as a research scientist with the National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, and a research associ- ate professor in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo. She has conducted research on a variety of topics in contaminant hydrogeology and geochemistry, including studies on mechanisms controlling the fate and transport of metals, nutrients, pathogens, organic solvents and petroleum products in ground- water, and the development of passive methods for remediating contaminated groundwater. Her current research focuses on passive groundwater remediation technologies, the release and transport of metals at northern mine sites, and the fate of wastewater contaminants in shallow sand aquifers. Dr. Ptacek holds a Ph.D. in groundwater geochemistry from the University of Waterloo. ROBIN MILLS RIDGWAY, Ph.D., is an environmental regulatory consultant and environmental engineer employed by Physical Facilities Radiological and En- vironmental Management/Utilities at Purdue University. She assists and advises the university with environmental compliance with state and federal regulations, including the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act. She also provides technical guidance and recommendations to the university's Wade Utility, which provides heating and cooling and approximately half of the electricity for Purdue's West Lafayette, Indiana, campus. She is a licensed professional engineer in Indiana. Dr. Ridgway holds a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Purdue University. LARRY ROBINSON, Ph.D., is a professor in the Environmental Sciences Insti- tute at Florida A&M University (FAMU). He previously served as director and professor of FAMU's Environmental Sciences Institute for six years and provost and vice president for academic affairs for two years before returning to the faculty ranks. Previously he was group leader of a neutron activation analysis laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). His research interests include environmental chemistry, the application of nuclear methods to detect trace elements in environmental matrices and environmental policy and manage-

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206 MANAGING COAL COMBUSTION RESIDUES IN MINES ment. While at ORNL he served on the National Laboratory Diversity Council and was president of the Oak Ridge Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Dr. Robinson is currently a member of the National Academies Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Eco- system. He earned his Ph.D. in nuclear chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis. MADAN M. SINGH, P.E., is director of the Arizona Department of Mines and Mineral Resources. Previous positions include president of Engineers Interna- tional, Inc., a faculty member at The Pennsylvania State University and manager for Soil and Rock Mechanics at IIT Research Institute. Dr. Singh's research interests and expertise encompass diverse aspects of rock mechanics, mining, hydrogeology, soil mechanics, grouting, tunneling, drilling, water jetting and pellet impact, nuclear waste disposal, geothermal energy, subsidence, geotechni- cal engineering, sustainable development, and environmental work. He devel- oped a graduate-level course in mine subsidence engineering at The Pennsylva- nia State University and acted as advisor during the drafting of subsidence control legislation in the State of Pennsylvania. He has a Ph.D. in mining engineering from The Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Singh has served in several capaci- ties for professional societies, including national director of the American Con- sulting Engineers Council, president of the Consulting Engineers Council of Illinois, member of the Board of Directors of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, Inc. (SME), chair of the SME Coal Division, and chair of the American Society for Testing and Materials subcommittee on rock strength. He has authored more than 100 technical papers, in addition to serving as chapter author on mine subsidence in the SME Mining Engineering Handbook (also associate editor), and Mining Environmental Handbook. Dr. Singh has served on two NRC committees, the U.S. National Committee on Rock Mechanics (1977- 1980) and the U.S. National Committee on Tunneling Technology (1974-1976). He was named a centennial fellow by the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (1996) and honored with the Robert Stefanko Distinguished Achievement Award by the Department of Energy and Geoenvironmental Engineering (1999), both at The Pennsylvania State University. He won the SME Howard N. Eavenson Award in 2000 and was selected as a distinguished member in 2004. In 1997, Dr. Singh was elected fellow of the American Consulting Engineers Council and fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1985. He is a life member of the Society of the Sigma Xi (since 1964), life member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (since 1965), and a charter member of the Institute of Shaft Drilling (since 1982). In 1990, he won the Minority Vendor of the Year Award (Illinois Minority and Female Business Enterprise Council). The Federal Highway Administration selected his company, Engineers International, Inc., for its 1999 Environmental Excellence Award.

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APPENDIX A 207 MARK SQUILLACE, J.D., is a professor of law and director of the Natural Resources Law Center at the University of Colorado School of Law. Before the University of Colorado he was the Charles Fornoff Professor of Law and Values at the University of Toledo. His teaching and research interests include public land law, water rights, natural resources law, environmental law, and administra- tive law. From 1986 through Mr. Squillace taught at the University of Wyoming College of Law. While there, he was the Winston Howard Professor of Law from 1993 to 1996. Prior to his academic career, Mr. Squillace worked as the director of litigation at the Environmental Policy Institute from 1981 through 1984 and as an attorney adviser at the Department of the Interior from 1978 through 1981, where he was involved in the early development of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. Mr. Squillace received his B.S. in mathematics from Michi- gan State University and his J.D. from the University of Utah College of Law. He is the author or coauthor of numerous books and articles on these subjects, in- cluding the National Environmental Policy Act Litigation Guide. In addition to his academic duties, Professor Squillace frequently offers pro bono legal assis- tance to conservation groups, primarily in the areas of mining law, endangered species protection, and environmental decision making. RICHARD J. SWEIGARD, Ph.D., is chairman and professor in the Depart- ment of Mining Engineering at the University of Kentucky. Prior to his academic positions, he was engineer for Betz-Converse-Murdoch and a consulting engi- neering geologist. Dr. Sweigard's research falls under the category of environ- mental impacts of mining including the alleviation of excessive compaction of reconstructed soil, post-mining land use, slope stabilization on abandoned mine lands, and disposal of coal combustion by-products. He is a registered engineer in Pennsylvania and his professional activities include the SME, the American So- ciety for Surface Mining and Reclamation, and the ASCE. Dr. Sweigard served as a member of the National Academies Committee for the Study on Preventing Coal Waste Impoundment Failures and Breakthroughs. He received his Ph.D. in mining engineering from The Pennsylvania State University. BAILUS WALKER, JR., Ph.D., is professor of environmental and occupa- tional medicine at Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC. His research interests include lead toxicity and environmental carcinogenesis. He was the commissioner of public health for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and state director of Public Health for Michigan. He is past president of the American Public Health Association, and a distinguished fellow of both the Royal Society of Health (London, England) and the American College of Epide- miology. Dr. Walker is a member of the National Academies' Institute of Medi- cine. He has served on several National Academies' committees, including as chair of the Committee on Toxicology. Dr. Walker received his Ph.D. in occupa-

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208 MANAGING COAL COMBUSTION RESIDUES IN MINES tional and environmental medicine from the University of Minnesota and his M.P.H from the University of Michigan. JOHN J. WARWICK, Ph.D., is executive director of the Division of Hydro- logic Sciences and director of the Nevada Institute for Water Resources at the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Prior to DRI, Dr. Warwick was professor and chair of the University of Florida's Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences and the director of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Systems Commercial Space Technology Center. Dr. Warwick's research interests include numerical modeling of the transport and fate of contaminants in surface-water systems and quantifying the impact of imperfect knowledge on the confidence associated with model predictions (un- certainty analysis). Dr. Warwick was named as a fellow of the American Water Resources Association in 2002, has served as vice chairman of the Urban Water Resources Research Council of the ASCE, and is a past president of the Ameri- can Water Resources Association. He is currently a registered professional engi- neer in Pennsylvania. Dr. Warwick received a Ph.D. in environmental engineer- ing from The Pennsylvania State University. JEFFREY J. WONG, Ph.D., is the deputy director of the Science, Pollution Prevention and Technology Program for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) at the California Environmental Protection Agency. His office is engaged in environmental measurements, biological and exposure monitoring, toxicology and risk assessment, pollution prevention and waste mini- mization, and verification and evaluation of technologies involved in hazardous waste detection, containment, treatment, disposal, or cleanup. Before his current appointment, Dr. Wong served as chief of DTSC's Human and Ecological Risk Division. In that position, he directed the scientific organization that gathers site characterization data and performs risk assessments in support of the state's hazardous waste and site remediation programs. He served by presidential ap- pointment on the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board from 1996 until 2002. Dr. Wong has served on several National Academies committees, includ- ing the Committee on Risk-Based Approaches for Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste, the Committee on Environmental Remediation at Naval Facilities, the Committee on Remedial Action Priorities for Hazardous Waste Sites and the Panel for Review of the DOE Environmental Restoration Priority System. Dr. Wong received his Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of California at Davis.

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APPENDIX A 209 STAFF BIOGRAPHIES TAMARA L. DICKINSON, study director, is associate director for the Na- tional Academies Space Studies Board. Prior to joining the Space Studies Board, she served as a senior program officer in the Board on Earth Sciences and Re- sources for the Committee on Earth Resources working on mining and energy policy issues. She has served as program director for the Petrology and Geochem- istry Program in the Division of Earth Sciences at the National Science Founda- tion. She has also served as discipline scientist for the Planetary Materials and Geochemistry Program at NASA Headquarters. As a postdoctoral fellow at the NASA Johnson Space Center, she conducted experiments on the origin and evo- lution of lunar rocks and highly reduced igneous meteorites. She holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in geology from the University of New Mexico and a B.A. in geology from the University of Northern Iowa. STEPHANIE E. JOHNSON is a senior program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the NRC in 2002, she has served as study director for four committees, including the Panel to Review the Critical Ecosys- tem Studies Initiative and the Committee on Water System Security Research. She has also worked on NRC studies on contaminant source remediation and the restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. She received her B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia on the subject of pesti- cide transport and microbial bioavailability in soils. Her research interests in- clude contaminant transport, aqueous geochemistry, and hydrogeology. K. JOHN HOLMES is a senior program officer with the NRC's Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Holmes has directed several major studies while at the NRC, including those that produced Modeling Mobile Source Emissions, Evaluating Vehicle Emissions Inspection and Maintenance Programs, and The Ongoing Challenge of Managing Carbon Monoxide Pollution in Fairbanks, Alaska. He received his Ph.D. from The John Hopkins University in environmental systems analysis, his M.S.E. in water resources management from University of Washington, and his B.S. in geology from Indiana University. His research interests include environmental systems modeling, policy analysis, and the history of environmental management. TANJA E. PILZAK is a research associate for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) in the Division on Earth and Life Studies. She holds an M.S. in environmental management from the University of Maryland University Col- lege and a B.S. in natural resources management from the University of Mary- land College Park. Ms. Pilzak has been with the National Academies since 1997; prior to her work in BESR she was a research associate in the Board on Agricul-

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210 MANAGING COAL COMBUSTION RESIDUES IN MINES ture and Natural Resources and a proposal specialist and contract assistant in the Office of Contracts and Grants. SANDI M. RUDENSTEIN is a report review and communications officer for the Division on Earth and Life Studies. She received an M.A. in government with a focus in environmental policy from The Johns Hopkins University in 2004 and a B.A. in environmental studies with a minor in political science from The George Washington University in 1999. Since joining the NRC in 2003, she has pro- duced communications materials and managed the peer-review process for nu- merous reports on topics such as air quality, disaster mitigation, geography, chemical sciences, sustainability, water resources, and toxicology. JAMES B. DAVIS is a program assistant for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He received a B.A. in political science from Brigham Young Univer- sity in 2001. He began working for the National Academies in 2004 and has primarily supported BESR activities on earth resource issues. ELIZABETH A. EIDE is a senior program officer and joined the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources as staff officer for the Committee on Earth Re- sources in October 2005. With a background in isotope geochronology applied to crustal processes, she spent twelve years at the Geological Survey of Norway in Trondheim as a researcher prior to joining the Academies staff. While at the Survey, her responsibilities included constructing and managing the 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology Laboratory, and directing several research departments. She com- pleted a Ph.D. in geology at Stanford University and received a B.A. in geology from Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. NICHOLAS D. ROGERS is a program assistant for the Board on Earth Sci- ences and Resources. He received a B.A. in history, with a focus on science and history, from Western Connecticut State University in 2004. He began working for the National Academies in 2006 and has primarily supported the Board on Earth Science and Resources activities on earth resource issues.