Study Committee Biographical Information

Dale F. Stein, Chair, is President Emeritus of Michigan Technological University. He has also been Vice President of Academic Affairs and Professor in the Departments of Metallurgical Engineering and Mining Engineering. He began his career as a Research Metallurgist at General Electric Research Laboratory. His major research interests are in the deformation and fracture of materials and the relationship between materials and the environment. Dr. Stein has an interest in the recycling and efficient use of materials. He was a pioneer in the application of auger spectroscopy to the solution of metallurgical problems and a leading authority on the mechanical properties of engineering materials. He is a Fellow of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society; the American Society for Metals; and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has been a member of more than 20 committees and panels of the National Academies. He has chaired many of these committees, including the Committee on Novel Approaches to the Management of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Systems, the Committee on Materials Science and Engineering, and the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB’s) Research and Technology Coordinating Committee for the Federal Highway Administration. He was a member of the National Materials Advisory Board. Dr. Stein was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1986. He holds a BS in metallurgy from the University of Minnesota and a PhD in metallurgy from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.


James E. Bernard is Anson Marston Distinguished Professor of Engineering at Iowa State University and Director of the Virtual Reality Applications Center. His research interests include vehicle dynamics and driving simulation, and he is a member of the Vehicle Dynamics Subcommittee of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). He has written numerous



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Tires and Passenger Vehicle Fuel Economy: Informing Consumers, Improving Performance - TRB Special Report 286 Study Committee Biographical Information Dale F. Stein, Chair, is President Emeritus of Michigan Technological University. He has also been Vice President of Academic Affairs and Professor in the Departments of Metallurgical Engineering and Mining Engineering. He began his career as a Research Metallurgist at General Electric Research Laboratory. His major research interests are in the deformation and fracture of materials and the relationship between materials and the environment. Dr. Stein has an interest in the recycling and efficient use of materials. He was a pioneer in the application of auger spectroscopy to the solution of metallurgical problems and a leading authority on the mechanical properties of engineering materials. He is a Fellow of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society; the American Society for Metals; and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has been a member of more than 20 committees and panels of the National Academies. He has chaired many of these committees, including the Committee on Novel Approaches to the Management of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Systems, the Committee on Materials Science and Engineering, and the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB’s) Research and Technology Coordinating Committee for the Federal Highway Administration. He was a member of the National Materials Advisory Board. Dr. Stein was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1986. He holds a BS in metallurgy from the University of Minnesota and a PhD in metallurgy from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. James E. Bernard is Anson Marston Distinguished Professor of Engineering at Iowa State University and Director of the Virtual Reality Applications Center. His research interests include vehicle dynamics and driving simulation, and he is a member of the Vehicle Dynamics Subcommittee of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). He has written numerous

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Tires and Passenger Vehicle Fuel Economy: Informing Consumers, Improving Performance - TRB Special Report 286 papers relating to motor vehicle rollover and associated vehicle test methods, including a comprehensive literature review. Dr. Bernard has received a number of awards for his contributions to graduate and undergraduate teaching, including the SAE Ralph R. Teetor Award for “significant contributions to teaching, research and student development.” He has received awards for his technical research papers from Tire Science and Technology and the MSC.Nastran World Users Conference. He was a member of the National Academies Committee for the Motor Vehicle Rollover Rating System Study. He held teaching and research positions at the University of Michigan and Michigan State University before joining the faculty of Iowa State University as Professor and Chairman of Mechanical Engineering in 1983. He received his BS, MS, and PhD in engineering mechanics from the University of Michigan. John Eagleburger retired in 2003 as Manager of Products Adjustments and Claims Performance for Goodyear Tire Company. From 1995 to 2002, he was Leader of the General Motors (GM) Team of the Akron Technical Center, where he managed a multidisciplinary engineering team in the design, testing, and approval of original equipment manufacturer passenger and light truck tires for GM vehicles. From 1988 to 1995, he was based in Tokyo as Goodyear’s Manager of Engineering and supplied tire products to Japanese and Korean automobile makers. He was previously GM account manager for Goodyear based in Detroit and manager of technical coordination for tire standards. Mr. Eagleburger began his career at Goodyear in 1965, serving as a tire design engineer and project engineer. He was active in SAE and served on several technical committees during his career. He holds a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin. Richard J. Farris is Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the Silvio Conte National Center for Polymer Research in the Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His research interests are in experimental mechanics, high-performance fibers, rubber elasticity and thermodynamics, particulate composites, and recycling of elastomers. He has more than 300 refereed publications and 16 patents. Dr. Farris served as Chairman of the Gordon Research Conference on Composites and the Gordon Research

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Tires and Passenger Vehicle Fuel Economy: Informing Consumers, Improving Performance - TRB Special Report 286 Conference on High-Performance Thermo-Setting Materials and as a member of numerous advisory committees for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other government agencies. He is a Fellow of the Society of Plastics Engineers and served as a member of the National Academies Panel on Structural and Multifunctional Materials. He is the recipient of the Roon Award of the Federation of Societies for Coating Technology (1998), the Malcolm Pruitt Award of the Council for Chemical Research (2003), the George Stafford Whitby Award from the Rubber Division of the American Chemical Society (2005), and the Founder’s Award from the Society of Plastics Engineers (2006). He holds an MS and a PhD in civil engineering from the University of Utah. David Friedman is Research Director for the Union of Concerned Scientists’ (UCS) Clean Vehicles Program. He is the author or coauthor of more than 30 technical papers and reports on advances in conventional, fuel cell, and hybrid electric vehicles and alternative energy sources with an emphasis on clean and efficient technologies. Before joining UCS in 2001, he worked for the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) in the Fuel Cell Vehicle Modeling Program, where he developed simulation tools to evaluate fuel cell technology for automotive applications. He worked on the UC Davis FutureCar team to build a hybrid electric family car that doubled fuel economy. He previously worked at Arthur D. Little researching fuel cell, battery electric, and hybrid electric vehicle technologies, as well as photovoltaics. Mr. Friedman is a member of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems’ Panel on Prospective Benefits of the Department of Energy’s Light-Duty Hybrid Vehicle R&D Program and previously served on that board’s Panel on the Prospective Benefits of the Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell R&D Program. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is a doctoral candidate in transportation technology and policy at UC Davis. Patricia S. Hu is Director of the Center for Transportation Analysis at the Engineering Science and Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). She has been at ORNL since 1982 and in her current position since 2000. At ORNL, she has led many projects in transportation statistics and analysis. She chairs TRB’s Standing Committee on National Data Requirements and Programs and serves on other TRB standing com-

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Tires and Passenger Vehicle Fuel Economy: Informing Consumers, Improving Performance - TRB Special Report 286 mittees. She served on the Editorial Advisory Board of the international journal Accident Analysis and Prevention from 1996 to 1998 and has served on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of Transportation Statistics since 1998. She led a team supported by the Transportation Security Administration studying the domain awareness of U.S. food supply chains by linking and analyzing geospatial data on transportation networks, traffic volume, choke points, freight flow, and traffic routing. She holds a bachelors degree from the National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan, and an MS in mathematics and statistics from the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Wolfgang G. Knauss is Theodore von Kármán Professor of Aeronautics and Applied Mechanics at the California Institute of Technology. His work has centered on understanding the mechanics of time-dependent fracture in polymeric materials. He has served on several national committees and delegations, including the National Committee on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (as chair), the U.S. delegation to the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics General Assembly, the Army Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology, and the Aerospace Scientific Advisory Committee. Dr. Knauss has received numerous awards during his academic career, including Woodrow Wilson Foundation Fellowship and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Fellowship. He is an Elected Fellow of the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and the National Academy of Mechanics. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1998 for engineering work on time-dependent fracture of polymers at interfaces and under dynamic loading. He was awarded the Senior U.S. Scientist Award by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Murray Medal of the Society of Experimental Mechanics. He holds a BS, an MS, and a PhD from the California Institute of Technology. Christopher L. Magee is Professor of the Practice, Mechanical Engineering, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is also Engineering Systems Director at MIT’s multidisciplinary Center for Innovation in Product Development. Before joining MIT in 2002, he worked for the Ford Motor Company, beginning in the Scientific Research

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Tires and Passenger Vehicle Fuel Economy: Informing Consumers, Improving Performance - TRB Special Report 286 Laboratory and progressing through a series of management positions to Executive Director of Programs and Advanced Engineering. In the latter position, he had responsibility for all major technically advanced areas in Ford’s product development organization. During his career at Ford, he made major contributions to the understanding of the transformation, structure, and strength of ferrous materials. He developed lightweight materials for automobile manufacturing and pioneered experimental work on high-rate structural collapse to improve vehicle crashworthiness. He initiated Ford’s computer-aided engineering for structural and occupant simulation for crashworthiness. Dr. Magee is internationally recognized for this work and received the Alfred Nobel Award of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1996. He has served on several National Academies committees, including the Panel on Materials Research Opportunities and Needs in Materials Science and Engineering and the Panel on Theoretical Foundations for Decision Making in Engineering Design. He currently serves on the Committee on Review of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Research Program. He earned a BS and a PhD from Carnegie-Mellon University and an MBA from Michigan State University. Marion G. Pottinger retired in 2003 as Technical Director, Smithers Scientific Services, Inc. He is now a private consultant. Smithers Scientific Services, where he worked for 15 years, is an independent testing, research, and consulting firm. Before joining Smithers, he was Associate Research and Development Fellow at Uniroyal Goodrich Tire Company, where he focused on the development of high-performance tires and instruments to measure tire wear. Before 1985, he was a senior manager in the BFGoodrich research and development unit, responsible for research in acoustics, vibration, vehicle dynamics, tire force and moment, wear, and structural mechanics. Dr. Pottinger has published more than 50 articles and book chapters on tires, gearing, high-performance composites, and instruments. He is President Emeritus of the Tire Society and a member of SAE’s Highway Tire Forum Committee, Vehicle Dynamics Standards Committee, and Chassis and Suspension Committee. He is a member of the ASTM F-09 Committee on Tires. He holds a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Cincinnati and an MS and a PhD in mechanical engineering from Purdue University.

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Tires and Passenger Vehicle Fuel Economy: Informing Consumers, Improving Performance - TRB Special Report 286 Karl J. Springer is retired Vice President of Automotive Products and Emissions Research at Southwest Research Institute. He oversaw a staff of more than 600 employees engaged in research, testing, and evaluation of diesel and gasoline engine lubricants, fuels, fluids, emissions, and components for automotive, truck, bus, and tractor products. His research interests have focused on the measurement and control of air pollution emissions from on-road and off-road vehicles and equipment powered by internal combustion engines. Mr. Springer has authored more than three dozen peer-reviewed technical papers and publications. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1996 and is a Fellow of ASME, a Fellow of SAE, and a Diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. He was named Honorary Member of ASME in 2003 for developing test methods for measuring emissions of smoke, odor, and particulate matter from internal combustion engines and advancing this understanding through extensive publishing activity. He is a recipient of ASME’s Honda Medal and Dedicated Service Award. He served on the National Academies Committee on Carbon Monoxide Episodes in Meteorological and Topographical Problem Areas and is a member of the Committee on State Practices in Setting Mobile Source Emissions Standards. He holds a BS in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University and an MS in physics from Trinity University. Margaret A. Walls is Resident Scholar at Resources for the Future (RFF). She was on the economics faculty of Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand, from 1998 to 2000 and a Fellow in RFF’s Energy and Natural Resources Division from 1987 to 1996. Her current research focuses on solid waste and recycling, urban land use, and air quality issues. She has published numerous articles that assess the efficiency and effectiveness of solid waste policies. In the area of transportation, Dr. Walls has modeled household vehicle ownership and use and the cost-effectiveness of various alternative fuels. She has published more than two dozen articles in refereed journals and a dozen book chapters on energy, waste disposal, and land use policies. She is a member of the American Economics Association and the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. She holds a BS in economics from the University of Kentucky and a PhD in economics from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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Tires and Passenger Vehicle Fuel Economy: Informing Consumers, Improving Performance - TRB Special Report 286 Joseph D. Walter retired in 1999 as President and Managing Director of Bridgestone Technical Center Europe (Rome). He is now an Adjunct Professor in the College of Engineering at the University of Akron, where he teaches engineering mechanics courses. Before joining the Bridgestone Technical Center in 1994, he was Vice President and Director of Research at Bridgestone/Firestone, Inc. He began his career at the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company in 1966, where he held a series of technical and management positions of increasing responsibility. Dr. Walter has authored or coauthored more than two dozen journal articles and book chapters on aspects of tire mechanics, materials, design, and testing. He recently coedited the book The Pneumatic Tire, with a grant from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. He is a founding member of the Tire Society and is active in SAE, the American Chemical Society, and ASME. He was a member of the National Academies Committee on Fuel Economy of Automobiles and Light Trucks. He holds a BS, an MS, and a PhD in mechanical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and an MBA from the University of Akron.