Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$35.50



View/Hide Left Panel

B
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

Douglas M. Fambrough, Ph.D., has been scientific director of the Searle Scholars Program since 1996. He served on its advisory board from 1980, the year the program was established, until 1984. Dr. Fambrough is also professor of biology at the Johns Hopkins University, where he teaches introductory biology and courses in cellular and molecular neuroscience. Previously he was a staff member at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Embryology. Research in Dr. Fambrough’s laboratory has focused on the characterization of membrane proteins, including ion transporters, receptors, and lysosomal membrane proteins, research that has received two Javitz Neuroscience Awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has served on the advisory board of the Muscular Dystrophy Association and on many editorial boards, including Physiological Reviews, Current Topics in Membranes, and, most recently, Cell Biology Education. He is a past president of the Society of General Physiologists and a councillor of the American Society for Cell Biology. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1968.


Jessica C. Fanzo, Ph.D., has been a program officer for medical research at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation since May 2004. She received her Ph.D. in interdisciplinary sciences from the University of Arizona. Her research focused on the role of p53, an important tumor suppressor gene in human cancers. In 2000, Dr. Fanzo began a postdoctoral fellowship in immunology at Columbia University in the Department of Molecular



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 127
Enhancing Philanthropy’s Support of Biomedical Scientists: Proceedings of a Workshop on Evaluation B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers Douglas M. Fambrough, Ph.D., has been scientific director of the Searle Scholars Program since 1996. He served on its advisory board from 1980, the year the program was established, until 1984. Dr. Fambrough is also professor of biology at the Johns Hopkins University, where he teaches introductory biology and courses in cellular and molecular neuroscience. Previously he was a staff member at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Embryology. Research in Dr. Fambrough’s laboratory has focused on the characterization of membrane proteins, including ion transporters, receptors, and lysosomal membrane proteins, research that has received two Javitz Neuroscience Awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has served on the advisory board of the Muscular Dystrophy Association and on many editorial boards, including Physiological Reviews, Current Topics in Membranes, and, most recently, Cell Biology Education. He is a past president of the Society of General Physiologists and a councillor of the American Society for Cell Biology. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1968. Jessica C. Fanzo, Ph.D., has been a program officer for medical research at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation since May 2004. She received her Ph.D. in interdisciplinary sciences from the University of Arizona. Her research focused on the role of p53, an important tumor suppressor gene in human cancers. In 2000, Dr. Fanzo began a postdoctoral fellowship in immunology at Columbia University in the Department of Molecular

OCR for page 127
Enhancing Philanthropy’s Support of Biomedical Scientists: Proceedings of a Workshop on Evaluation Medicine. Her research focused primarily on autoimmunity. During her postdoc, Dr. Fanzo received a Stephen I. Morse fellowship and an Immunology Training Grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Nancy Fishman, M.P.H., is an evaluation officer in the Research and Evaluation Unit at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Ms. Fishman’s portfolio of evaluation/assessment grants covers a wide range of health and health care topics reflecting the foundation’s mission. In addition, she is a member of the Nursing and Human Capital Teams. She is a program officer for a number of grants, reflecting her interest in issues related to increased community capacity for long-term care for the elderly; this includes the cash and counseling program. Prior to joining the Foundation in 1997, she worked as a research specialist at the University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health. During her time in Pittsburgh, she worked as program director for a community outreach, education, and research project on cancer screening and as project coordinator at the Epidemiologic Data Center on a number of National Institutes of Health (NIH)–funded registries and clinical trials in the area of cardiovascular research. Ms. Fishman holds an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a B.S. in nursing from the University of Connecticut. Amy L. Francis, Ph.D., is the scientific director of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. She currently oversees all three of the foundation’s grant programs, which include postdoctoral, young investigator, and clinical investigator awards in cancer research. She served as senior science editor at The Scientist magazine prior to joining the foundation in 2000. Dr. Francis is a graduate of Vassar College (B.A., biochemistry, 1990) and Yale University (Ph.D., molecular biophysics and biochemistry, 1997). She completed postdoctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania. William Galey, Ph.D., is director of Graduate and Medical Education Programs at Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Maryland. As a director in Grants and Special Programs at HHMI, he oversees the institute’s two research training programs for medical and dental students. Dr. Galey also directs HHMI’s efforts in graduate studies, including the Predoctoral Fellowship Program, the institute’s involvement in laboratory management training and advanced biological science courses in partnership with leading nonprofit organizations such as Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories and the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory. Dr. Galey has developed and directs HHMI’s new initiative “Med to Grad,” aimed at bringing a better understanding of

OCR for page 127
Enhancing Philanthropy’s Support of Biomedical Scientists: Proceedings of a Workshop on Evaluation medicine and pathobiology to Ph.D. graduate education in the biomedical sciences. He also leads the institute’s involvement in the new HHMI-NIBIB Interfaces Initiative for Interdisciplinary Graduate Research Training. The goal of this new partnership with NIH is to stimulate the development of training of biomedical scientists at the interface with the physical, mathematical, or computational sciences. After a brief period in the pharmaceutical industry, Dr. Galey joined the University of New Mexico School of Medicine where he taught physiology to medical, graduate, and allied health students; conducted research; and held various administrative positions for over 30 years before joining HHMI in 2002. At UNM he served as associate dean of graduate studies and interim associate dean for research. As an educator, Dr. Galey has been involved in the development and dissemination of innovative methodologies in medical education and has directed Ph.D. and M.D.-Ph.D. programs in the biomedical sciences. He has been active in professional organizations working to improve elementary science education and enhancing the graduate education opportunities for members of underrepresented groups. Dr Galey holds a Ph.D. from the University of Oregon Medical School and was a fellow of Harvard University. Patricia C. Hinton is director of research administration and information services for the American Heart Association. Prior to joining the AHA in 1983, Ms. Hinton held research associate positions at the University of Michigan’s Center for Human Growth and Development and the School of Public Health. In her current position she is responsible for administration of the association’s national research program and for providing management services for seven of 12 AHA affiliate research programs. Beginning in 1988, she led the AHA’s development of a research program evaluation plan. Since 1997 she has spearheaded the Association’s adoption of electronic research administration, including Web-based promotion, application submission, peer review and postaward administration. She also oversees the management of the association’s CRM database for science professionals and assists in coordinating the professional membership program. She holds an M.A. in anthropology and an M.S. in statistics from the University of Tennessee. Martin Ionescu-Pioggia, Ph.D., is a senior program officer for the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. He joined BWF in 1994 and manages career awards in the biomedical sciences, initiatives in outcome evaluation, and postdoctoral and faculty career development. He completed pre-and postdoctoral research fellowships at McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School, where he served as associate project director for substance abuse research. Before joining BWF, he taught psychology at the

OCR for page 127
Enhancing Philanthropy’s Support of Biomedical Scientists: Proceedings of a Workshop on Evaluation University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, from 1980 to 1983. From 1983 to 1994 he worked at the pharmaceutical firm Burroughs Wellcome Company as a clinical research scientist in the neurosciences developing antidepressants and antiepileptics, and as a medical liaison to marketing. He currently holds faculty appointments at McLean Hospital-Harvard Medical School and Duke University Medical School. With Maryrose Franko at HHMI, he conceived and developed the 2002 and 2005 BWF-HHMI Courses in Laboratory Management (www.hhmi.org/labmanagement) and the Science Next Wave Career Development Center (www.nextwave.sciencemag.org). Dr. Ionescu-Pioggia received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1985. Krystyna R. Isaacs, Ph.D., has been a program development and evaluation consultant since 1998. Her current and past clients include the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the Federation of Associations and Societies of Experimental Biology (FASEB), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and JGPerpich, LLC. In a joint project with HHMI and AAAS, she developed a database and supervised the design of the Web interface for the Undergraduate GrantsNet initiative, and she advised on the design of the AAAS Minority Scientists Network. She designed the pre- and postworkshop assessment of the 2005 FASEB Individual Development Plan workshop. Recently she conducted the 2002 Burroughs Wellcome Fund/HHMI Lab Management course evaluation and has completed several evaluations for other HHMI graduate programs. Dr. Isaacs is presently managing program development and evaluation with regard to the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH) International Virtual Collaboratory at JGPerpich, LLC. She conducted the in-depth interviews with former Markey scholars and is assisting in drafting a summary report as part of the National Research Council’s assessment of the Lucille P. Markey Charitable Trust Scholars program. After completing a postdoc at NIMH in neurodegeneration, she took a position in the HHMI International Program as a program administrator. She graduated from Williams College in 1984 with a B.A. in biopsychology and earned a Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, in 1992. Carter Kimsey is a program manager in the Directorate for Biological Sciences at the National Science Foundation (NSF). In the directorate, she has served as a program officer for several programs, including metabolic biology, integrative biology, and, for the past 10 years, postdoctoral fellowships in biology. During this time she has managed programs in plant

OCR for page 127
Enhancing Philanthropy’s Support of Biomedical Scientists: Proceedings of a Workshop on Evaluation biology, molecular evolution, biosciences related to the environment, biological informatics, and NSF’s longest-running postdoctoral fellowship program for underrepresented minorities. Before joining NSF, Ms. Kimsey worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Beltsville and for the Environmental Protection Agency. She received an M.S. in biochemistry from the University of Illinois. Connie L. McNeely, Ph.D., is an associate professor of public policy at George Mason University. She also serves as associate director in the Fellowships Office of the National Academies and is active in several professional associations, including the Comparative and International Education Society, the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, the International Studies Association, the American Sociological Association, and the Law and Society Association. Her research and teaching address various aspects of organizational behavior; education; technology and society; politics; race, ethnicity, and nation; and culture. As reflected in her book Constructing the Nation-State: International Organization and Prescriptive Action, part of her work has engaged issues related to the development of and challenges to the nation-state system and to questions of international interaction and organization in general. She is currently working on a larger initiative on democratizing education in the United States and elsewhere. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University. Christine O’Brien is a program supervisor at the National Research Council (NRC) with administrative responsibility for the Ford Foundation’s diversity fellowships at the predoctoral, dissertation, and postdoctoral levels. She has been involved in the administration of federally and privately funded programs managed by the Fellowship Office of the NRC since 1974. She cofounded the Fellowship Roundtable, an NRC-based organization that brings together over 50 administrators of fellowship programs twice yearly to discuss topics of interest to them and to the graduate community at large. The roundtable has hosted presentations on stipend levels, transitions to diversity programs, federal funding for fellowship programs, visa issues for sponsors of international programs, and other issues of importance to fellowship administrators. Chuck Sherman, Ph.D., is acting director, of the Office of Evaluation, Office of Science Policy, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has been conducting evaluation and policy studies in Washington D.C. for 30 years, starting at the National Research Council in 1975 on the staff of the National Board on Graduate Education and briefly on the Study of National Needs for Biomedical and Behavioral

OCR for page 127
Enhancing Philanthropy’s Support of Biomedical Scientists: Proceedings of a Workshop on Evaluation Research Personnel. For the next seven years, he worked at the Association of American Medical Colleges in the Division of Operational Studies (with the institutional and faculty databases) and in the Division of Biomedical Research, studying faculty career patterns and evaluating the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institutes (NHLBI) Pulmonary Academic Award Program (K07). At the NIH since 1982, Dr. Sherman was project officer for an evaluation of the Research Career Development Award (K04), supported the further development and use of the Consolidated Grant Applicant and Trainee and Fellow Files, and as project officer over-saw the National Research Council’s “Personnel Needs” contract for nine years until 1991. For the next 10 years, he was deputy director of the Office of Medical Applications of Research. Since returning to the Office of Science Policy, he has worked to manage the Evaluation Set-aside program and has had oversight responsibility for support of projects conducted for NIH by the National Academies. Dr. Sherman attended Dartmouth College and earned a Ph.D. in quantitative psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ralph Vogler, M.D., is the program director for clinical research, cancer control and epidemiology and leukemia, immunology, and blood cell research programs at the American Cancer Society. He is a member of American Society of Hematology, American Association for Cancer Research, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and International Society of Experimental Hematology. Before assuming his position at ACS, he served in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps as a National Cancer Institute (NCI) field investigator. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Emory University and joined the faculty of the Department of Hematology/Oncology at Emory University School of Medicine. He continued to serve there until 1955, when he assumed the position of emeritus professor. Dr. Vogler received his B.S. and M.D. degrees from Northwestern University.