Appendixes



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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research Appendixes

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research This page intially left blank

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research Appendix A Biographies of Committee Members and Staff Robert W. Lucky, Chair, retired in 2003 as corporate vice president of Applied Research at Telcordia Technologies, which he joined in 1992. He began his telecommunications career at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, N.J., where he was initially involved in studying ways of sending digital information over telephone lines. The best-known outcome of this work was his invention of the adaptive equalizer—a technique for correcting distortion in telephone signals that is used in all high-speed data transmission today. The textbook on data communications that he co-authored became the most-cited reference in the communications field over the period of a decade. At Bell Labs he moved through a number of levels to become executive director of the Communications Sciences Research Division in 1982, where he was responsible for research on the methods and technologies for future communication systems. He has been active in professional activities and has served as president of the Communications Society of the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), and as vice president and executive vice president of the parent IEEE. He has been editor of several technical journals, including the Proceedings of the IEEE, and since 1982 he has written the bimonthly “Reflections” column of personalized observations about the engineering profession in Spectrum magazine. In 1993 these “Reflections” columns were collected in the IEEE Press book Lucky Strikes … Again. He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is also a consulting editor for a series of books on communications through Plenum Press. He has been on the advisory boards or committees of many universities and government organizations and was chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the United States Air Force from 1986 to 1989. He was the 1987 recipient of the prestigious Marconi Prize for his contributions to data communications, and he has been awarded honorary doctorates from Purdue University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He has also been awarded the Edison Medal of the IEEE and the Exceptional Civilian Contributions Medal of the U.S. Air Force. Lucky is a frequent speaker before both scientific and general audiences. He has been an invited lecturer at about 100 different universities and has been a guest on a number of network television shows, includ-

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research ing Bill Moyers’ “A World of Ideas,” where he discussed the impacts of future technological advances. He is the author of the popular book Silicon Dreams, a semi-technical and philosophical discussion of the ways in which both humans and computers deal with information. A native of Pittsburgh, he attended Purdue University, where he received a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering in 1957 and master of science and doctoral degrees in 1959 and 1961. James D. Adams is a professor of economics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. In addition he is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Prior to joining Rensselaer he was a professor of economics at the University of Florida. He has also held visiting appointments at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Bureau of the Census, and the George J. Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State at the University of Chicago. He received a B.A. in economics from the University of New Mexico in 1967 and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1976. Adams has published numerous articles on the economics of technical change, with an emphasis on the causes and consequences of industrial and academic research and development, as well as numerous articles in the fields of labor and public economics. His current research focuses on the limits of the firm in research and development, the measurement of scientific influence, the identification of alternative channels of knowledge externalities in the economy, the structure and meaning of scientific teams and collaborations, the speed of diffusion of scientific research, the interaction between investment in industrial research and development and investment in physical capital, and the determinants of research and teaching productivity in academia. John M. Cioffi is a professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University. He worked at Bell Laboratories from 1978 to 1984 and at International Business Machines Research from 1984 to 1986. Cioffi founded Amati Com. Corp. in 1991 (purchased by TI in 1997) and was officer/director from 1991 to 1997. He currently is on the board of directors of ASSIA (chair), Teranetics, ClariPhy, and Vector Inc. and is on the advisory boards of Portview Ventures, Wavion, MySource, and Amicus. Cioffi’s specific interests are in the area of high-performance digital transmission. His various awards include Marconi fellow (2006); holder of Hitachi America Professorship in Electrical Engineering at Stanford (2002); member, National Academy of Engineering (2001); IEEE Kobayashi Medal (2001); IEEE Millennium Medal (2000); IEEE fellow (1996); IEEE J.J. Thomson Medal (2000); University of Illinois Outstanding Alumnus (1999); IEEE Communications Magazine best paper (1991); ANSI T1 Outstanding Achievement Award (1995); NSF Presidential Investigator (1987-1992); and ISSLS Outstanding Paper award (2004). Cioffi has published over 250 papers and holds over 80 patents. He has a B.S.E.E. degree from the University of Illinois and a Ph.D.E.E. from Stanford University. Richard A. DeMillo is the John P. Imlay Dean and Distinguished Professor of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is also a member of the board of directors for RSA Security. He returned to academia after a career as an executive in industry and government. He was chief technology officer for Hewlett-Packard, where he had worldwide responsibility for technology and technology strategy. Prior to joining HP, he was in charge of Information and Computer Sciences Research at Telcordia Technologies (formerly Bellcore) in Morristown, New Jersey, where he oversaw the development of many Internet and Web-based innova-

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research tions. He has also directed the Computer and Computation Research Division of the National Science Foundation. Before joining industry during the Internet boom, he held several academic positions. He was professor of computer sciences and director of the Software Engineering Research Center at Purdue University. He also held major faculty positions at Georgia Tech, where he was the founding director of the Software Research Center, and had a visiting professorship at the University of Padua in Padua, Italy. As dean of the College of Computing he is the chief academic officer for one of the largest programs at Georgia Tech. He is deeply immersed in the problem of creating a high-tech workforce that will be competitive in the new “flat world” created by the convergence of enabling technology and geopolitical forces. The author of over 100 articles, books, and patents, DeMillo has conducted research that spans computer science and includes innovation in computer networking, computer security, software engineering, and mathematics. His present research interests are focused on information security. He is developing hardware-based architectures for trusted computing platforms and investigating methods for securing wireless communication services. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). Reed Hundt served as chair of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) from 1993 to 1997. Prior to heading the FCC, he was a partner in the Washington, D.C., office of Latham & Watkins. Mr. Hundt currently serves on the board of directors of Intel, Pronto Networks, Tropos Networks, Polyserve, Entrisphere, and Access Spectrum, and he is an advisor to the Blackstone Group and to McKinsey & Company. He is a member of the advisory committee at the Yale School of Management and co-chair of the Forum on Communications and Society at the Aspen Institute. Mr. Hundt is the author of You Say You Want a Revolution: A Story of Information Age Politics (Yale University Press, 2000) and In China’s Shadow: The Crisis of American Entrepreneurship (Yale University Press, 2006). He graduated magna cum laude from Yale College (1969) with exceptional distinction in history. He is also a graduate of Yale Law School (1974) and is a member of the District of Columbia, Maryland, and California bars. Jeffrey M. Jaffe is executive vice president and chief technical officer of Novell. He is responsible for Novell’s technology direction, as well as leading Novell’s product business units. Jaffe serves as a member of Novell’s Worldwide Management Committee. After receiving a Ph.D. in computer science from MIT in 1979, Jaffe joined IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center. During his tenure at IBM, he held a wide variety of technical and management positions, including vice president, Systems and Software Research, corporate vice president of technology, and general manager of IBM’s SecureWay business unit, where he was responsible for IBM’s security, directory, and networking software business. Jaffe most recently served as president of Bell Labs Research and Advanced Technologies, where he established new facilities in Ireland and India, and he served as chair of the board of the New Jersey Nanotechnology Consortium. Jaffe was also appointed by President Bill Clinton to serve on the Advisory Committee for the Presidential Commission for Critical Infrastructure Protection. He has also chaired the Chief Technology Officer group of the Computer Systems Policy Project and has served on the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. He is a fellow of ACM and the IEEE. Jaffe holds a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in electrical engineering in addition to his doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research Edward Kozel has been the managing member of Open Range Ventures, a venture capital firm, since January 2000. Until 2002 he was a member of the board of directors of Cisco Systems, Inc., where he worked for 11 years in a variety of roles, including chief technology officer and senior vice president of business development. During his tenure at Cisco, he founded the business development group, which, under his direction, was responsible for more than 22 technology acquisitions and 25 minority investments. Kozel is an industry innovator who previously worked at Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, and SRI International, where he participated in the early design and development of the Internetwork Protocol (IP) model and TCP/IP, packet radio networks, and highly distributed information systems. In addition to Yahoo!, Kozel serves on the boards of Reuters PLC and Symbol Technologies. He graduated from the University of California, Davis with a degree in electrical engineering. Rajiv Laroia is the chief technology officer (CTO) of Qualcomm Flarion Technologies. He was the founder and CTO of Flarion Technologies, a company that specialized in wireless broad-band technology. Flarion was acquired by Qualcomm in January 2006. Prior to launching Flarion, Dr. Laroia was with Lucent Technologies’ Bell Laboratories’ Mathematical Sciences Research Center. In 1997, he became head of Bell Labs’ Digital Communications Research Department in the Wireless Research Center, where he and his team started to develop a flash-OFDM technology-based wireless data system. His years at Bell Labs have generated numerous publications and patents with total patent licensing revenue in excess of $25 million. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1992 and 1989 and a B.Tech. degree in 1985 from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi—all in electrical engineering. He is an expert in CDMA, TDMA, and other cellular multiple-access technologies and is intimately familiar with current and next-generation wireless standards. David Messerschmitt is Roger A. Strauch Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. His current research interests fall at the overlap between technology, business, and economics. More specifically, he considers how technology should be different than it is currently in order to meet the needs of end users and end-user organizations and to be more successful in the marketplace. Messerschmitt holds several patents and has authored several books on networked applications. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of NSF’s Division of Computer Science and Engineering, the NSF Blue Ribbon Panel on Cyberinfrastructure, and the National Academy of Engineering. He served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. He is also an IEEE and International Engineering Consortium fellow. He received his M.S. (1968) and Ph.D. (1971) in computer information and control engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Eli M. Noam has been a professor of economics and finance at the Columbia Business School since 1976. He served for 3 years as a commissioner for public services of New York state; was director of the Columbia Institute for Tele-Information, a university-based research center focusing on strategy, management, and policy issues in telecommunications, computing, and electronic mass media; and was chair of the M.B.A. concentration in media management and of the Virtual Institute of Information. He has also taught at Columbia Law School, Princeton University’s Economics Department and Woodrow Wilson School, and the University of St. Gallen, and he is active in the development of electronic distance education. An author or editor of 24 books and over 300 articles in economics journals, law reviews, and interdiscipli-

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research nary journals, he is a former member of the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC). Noam was also a member of the boards or advisory boards for the federal government’s FTS-2000 telecommunications network, the IRS’s computer system reorganization, the National Computer Systems Laboratory, the National Commission on the Status of Women in Computing, the Intek Corporation, and Jones International University, the first accredited e-university. He served on the National Research Council study committee that produced Broadband: Bringing Home the Bits (2002). He is a fellow of the World Economic Forum, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a commercially rated pilot, and an active search and rescue mission pilot with the Civil Air Patrol (1st Lt.). He received the degrees of A.B. (Phi Beta Kappa), M.A., Ph.D. (economics), and J.D. from Harvard University. Daniel Pike is chief technology officer of GCI Cable and Entertainment. He entered the cable industry in 1973 (LVO/United) and recently served as CTO of Classic Communications (2000-2003). Prior to that he was senior vice president of science and technology for Prime Cable and its related entities (1977-2000). He has served on the board of directors of CableLabs since its inception, received the NCTA Vanguard Award for Science and Technology in 1991 and the Texas Telecommunications 2000 Johnny Mankin Award, was elected to the SCTE Hall of Fame, is a former director of COM21 (a cable modem manufacturer), and advises other technology-related organizations. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers, is a member of the Society of Motion Pictures and Television Engineers, and speaks frequently and publishes on broadband and telecommunications issues. He served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Pike earned bachelor of science and master of science degrees from Oklahoma State University. Lawrence Rabiner is the associate director, Center for Advanced Information Processing at Rutgers University. He retired as the vice president of research at AT&T Laboratories in 2002 after a career at AT&T that spanned almost 40 years in Research. He has co-authored four major books in the signal-processing field: Theory and Application of Digital Signal Processing (1975), Digital Processing of Speech Signals (1978), Multirate Digital Signal Processing (1983), and Fundamentals of Speech Recognition (1993). He has written or co-authored over 300 articles, including many on speech recognition and speech synthesis, and has been the recipient of 25 patents. He is a fellow of the IEEE (1976) and the Acoustical Society of America, served as editor of the ASSP Transactions, and is a former member of the Proceedings of the IEEE editorial board. He has also been active in the Signal Processing Society and its predecessors, acting as its vice president (1973) and president (1974-1975). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. Rabiner received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering simultaneously in 1964, and his Ph.D. in 1967, all from MIT. His Ph.D. thesis and some of his early work at Bell Laboratories were in the field of speech synthesis, and since 1967 he has worked on a range of topics in the areas of digital signal processing and machine recognition of speech, including digital filter design, implementation of digital systems, spectrum analysis systems, pattern recognition clustering methods, and the hidden Markov model method. Theodore S. Rappaport is the William and Bettye Nowlin Professor in Engineering at the University of Texas and is director of the Wireless Networking and Communications Group

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research (WNCG) at the university’s Austin campus, a center he founded in 2002. From 1988 to 2002, he was on the electrical and computer engineering faculty of Virginia Tech, where he founded the Mobile & Portable Radio Research Group (MPRG), one of the world’s first university research and teaching centers dedicated to the wireless communications field. In 1989, he founded TSR Technologies Inc., a cellular radio/PCS software radio manufacturer that was sold in 1993. In 1995, he founded Wireless Valley Communications Inc., a pioneering creator of site-specific radio propagation software for network design and management. Wireless Valley was acquired by Motorola Inc. in 2005. Rappaport received the Marconi Young Scientist Award in 1990, an NSF Presidential Faculty Fellowship in 1992, the Sarnoff Citation from the Radio Club of America in 2000, the Fredrick S. Terman Outstanding Electrical Engineering Faculty Award from the American Society of Engineering Education in 2002, and the Stuart F. Meyer Award from the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society in 2005. Rappaport has over 100 U.S. or international patents issued or pending and has authored, co-authored, and co-edited 18 books in the wireless field. In 1999, his work on site-specific propagation received the IEEE Communications Society Stephen O. Rice Prize Paper Award. He serves on the editorial boards of several academic and technical journals, is a fellow of the IEEE, and is active in the IEEE Communications and Vehicular Technology societies. He has consulted for over 25 multinational corporations and has served the International Telecommunication Union as a consultant for emerging nations. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Purdue University in 1982, 1984, and 1987, respectively. William J. Spencer advises the Washington Advisory Group on corporate R&D strategy, technology management, and corporate-academic partnerships. Dr. Spencer is Chairman Emeritus of International SEMATECH, a research and development consortium of international corporations involved in semiconductor manufacturing. He served as CEO and president of SEMATECH from 1990 to 1997, during which time the U.S. semiconductor industry regained its global market position and SEMATECH evolved from a government industry cooperative to an international R&D activity. Prior to 1990, Dr. Spencer managed worldwide research and technology for Xerox Corporation as group vice president and senior technical officer at Xerox’s headquarters in Stamford, Connecticut, and as vice president and manager of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. He was director of microelectronics and then director of weapon systems development at Sandia National Laboratories from 1973 to 1981. He began his career at Bell Telephone Laboratories in 1959. Dr. Spencer is a research professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico as a result of work he did at Sandia National Laboratories on the first implantable electronic drug delivery systems. As a member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has contributed to several National Research Council studies on high-technology industries; technology strategies for the future; and international cooperation and competitiveness. He is vice chair of the National Research Council’s Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy. Spencer received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from Kansas State University, and an A.B. from William Jewell College in Missouri. David Teece is Mitsubishi Bank Professor of International Business and Finance at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. He is director of Berkeley’s Institute of Management, Innovation and Organization (IMIO). He has been at Haas since 1982. He previously served as assistant professor of business economics at Stanford University. His research interests include the competitive performance of firms in the global marketplace, innovation

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research and the organization of industry, and technology policy, telecommunications policy, antitrust policy, and energy policy at the national and international levels. He holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Pennsylvania, and B.A. and M.Comm. degrees from the University of Canterbury. Hemant Thapar is chair and CEO of Link-A-Media Devices, a fabless semiconductor company specializing in the development of system-on-chip connectivity solutions for storage media. After receiving his Ph.D. degree from Purdue University in 1979, Thapar held various technical and management positions in advanced technology development at Bell Telephone Laboratories, Holmdel (1979-1984) and at IBM Corporation, San Jose (1984-1994). He co-founded DataPath Systems Inc. in 1994 and was its CEO until July 2000 when it merged with LSI Logic Corporation, where he was a senior vice-president until 2004. He has also served on the faculty of Santa Clara University since 1984 where he regularly teaches graduate-level courses in digital communications and signal processing. He is also on the advisory committee of Ambala College of Engineering and Applied Research, a newly formed engineering school in India. Thapar’s interests are in the areas of communication signal processing, system engineering, and VLSI development. He has authored many publications and patents in the areas of data communications, networking, and data storage. He is co-recipient of three best-paper awards for his work on high-speed data transmission and high-density data storage. Thapar has served as guest editor of two issues of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications devoted to signal processing and coding for data storage. Thapar is a fellow of the IEEE. Jack K. Wolf is the Stephen O. Rice Professor of Magnetics in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of California, San Diego. Prior to joining UCSD, Wolf held full-time faculty appointments at New York University, the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His research interests are signal processing for recording, information theory, coding theory, and communications. His industrial experience includes working at RCA Laboratories, Bell Laboratories, and Qualcomm Inc. At Qualcomm Inc. he was concerned with the design and development of wireless communication systems. He was a Guggenheim fellow and a former president of the IEEE Information Theory Group. He received the 2001 Claude E. Shannon Award from the IEEE Information Theory Society and the 1998 Koji Kobayashi Computer and Communications Award from the IEEE. In 1975 he received the IEEE Information Theory Group Prize Paper Award for the paper “Noiseless Coding for Correlated Information Sources,” which he co-authored with David Slepian. He is editor of the book series “Information Technology: Transmission Processing and Storage” published by Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publications. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received his B.S.E.E. degree from the University of Pennsylvania and M.S.E., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University. Staff Jon Eisenberg is director of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. At CSTB, he has been the study director for a diverse body of work, including a series of studies exploring Internet and broadband policy and networking and communications technologies. Current studies include an examination of emerging wireless technologies and spectrum policy and a study of how to use information technologies to

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research enhance disaster management. In 1995-1997 he was a AAAS Science, Engineering, and Diplomacy Fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where he worked on environmental management, technology transfer, and information and telecommunications policy issues. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington in 1996 and a B.S. in physics with honors from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1988. David Padgham rejoined CSTB as an associate program officer in the spring of 2006 following nearly 2 years as a policy analyst in the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM’s) Washington, D.C., Office of Public Policy, where he worked closely with that organization’s public policy committee, USACM. Previously, he spent nearly 6 years with CSTB, working on—among other things—the studies that produced Trust in Cyberspace, Funding a Revolution, Broadband: Bringing Home the Bits, LC21: A Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress, and The Internet’s Coming of Age. Currently, he is focused on the CSTB projects related to telecommunications R&D, software dependability, and privacy in the information age. He holds a master’s degree in library and information science (2001) from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and a bachelor of arts degree (1996) in English from Warren Wilson College in Asheville, N.C. Cynthia A. Patterson (study director through June 2004) was a study director and program officer with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. She worked on a diverse set of CSTB projects, including a project on critical information infrastructure protection and the law, a study on the future of supercomputing, and a study on telecommunications research and development. She was also involved with the congressionally mandated study on Internet searching and the Domain Name System. Prior to joining CSTB, Patterson completed an M.Sc. from the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her graduate work was supported by the Department of Defense and SAIC. She was also employed by IBM as an IT consultant for both federal government and private industry clients; her work included application development, database administration, network administration, and project management. She received a B.Sc. in computer science from the University of Missouri-Rolla. Jennifer M. Bishop, program associate, has been with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board since 2001. She is currently involved in studies on policy consequences and legal/ethical implications of offensive information warfare and assessing the information technology research and development ecosystem. She also maintains CSTB’s contact database, handles updates to the CSTB Web site, coordinates the layout and design of Update, the CSTB newsletter, and designs book covers and promotional materials. Prior to her move to Washington, Bishop worked for the city of Ithaca, New York, coordinating the Police Department’s transition to a new SQL-based time accrual and scheduling application. Her other work experience includes designing customized hospitality industry performance reports for RealTime Hotel Reports, LLC, maintaining the police records database for the city of Ithaca, and freelance publication design. She is a visual artist working in oil and mixed media. She holds a B.F.A. from Cornell University.

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Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research Phil Hilliard (research associate through June 2004) was a research associate on the professional staff of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board who worked on projects focusing on telecommunications research, supercomputing, and dependable systems. Before joining the National Academies, he worked at BellSouth in Atlanta, Georgia, as a competitive intelligence analyst and at NCR as a technical writer and trainer. He earned an M.B.A. from Georgia State University (2000) in Atlanta and a B.S. in computer and information technology from Georgia Institute of Technology (1986) in Atlanta. He is currently working on a master’s of library and information science in Florida State University’s online program.