D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Bernard D. Goldstein, M.D. (Chair), is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and the former dean at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Previously he served as the director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He was also principal investigator for the Consortium of Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP). Dr. Goldstein was assistant administrator for research and development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1983–1985. His past activities include serving as a member and chairman of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toxicology Study Section and EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee; chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Role of the Physician in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the National Research Council (NRC) Committees on Biomarkers in Environmental Health Research and Risk Assessment Methodology, and the Industry Panel of the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Health and Environment. He is a member of the IOM, where he has cochaired the section on Public Health, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology. He is a member and past president of the Society for Risk Analysis. He is a member and fellow of the American College of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, and a member of the Collegium Ramazzini, the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health, the Society of Toxicology, and the American Public Health Association. Dr. Goldstein is the past recipi-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 197
Hearing Loss Research at NIOSH: Reviews of Research Programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Bernard D. Goldstein, M.D. (Chair), is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and the former dean at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Previously he served as the director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He was also principal investigator for the Consortium of Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP). Dr. Goldstein was assistant administrator for research and development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1983–1985. His past activities include serving as a member and chairman of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toxicology Study Section and EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee; chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Role of the Physician in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the National Research Council (NRC) Committees on Biomarkers in Environmental Health Research and Risk Assessment Methodology, and the Industry Panel of the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Health and Environment. He is a member of the IOM, where he has cochaired the section on Public Health, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology. He is a member and past president of the Society for Risk Analysis. He is a member and fellow of the American College of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, and a member of the Collegium Ramazzini, the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health, the Society of Toxicology, and the American Public Health Association. Dr. Goldstein is the past recipi-

OCR for page 197
Hearing Loss Research at NIOSH: Reviews of Research Programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ent of the Robert A. Kehoe Award of Merit of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. He received his medical degree from New York University. Beth A. Cooper, M.S., is an acoustical engineer and manager of the Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center, where she provides noise control engineering support to help Glenn Research Center’s science experiment payloads meet International Space Station hearing conservation goals. Under her direction, the ATL offers a comprehensive array of National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP)-accredited testing, low-noise design, and educational services for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and external customers. The ATL also produces and distributes resources and training tools for use by hearing conservationists and noise control professionals. Ms. Cooper previously developed and managed Glenn Research Center’s hearing conservation and community noise programs. She has managed the implementation of noise control projects for NASA’s experimental facilities, as well as the design and construction of two major acoustical testing laboratories. Ms. Cooper is a registered professional engineer in the State of Ohio, a board-certified noise control engineer, and a certified occupational hearing conservationist. She has represented the Institute of Noise Control Engineering on the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation and is a member of the study committee of the National Academy of Engineering project Technology for a Quieter America. Ms. Cooper is a frequent presenter on hearing conservation topics, with a special interest in presentation techniques and tools for effective hearing conservation training. She received her master’s degree in acoustics from the Pennsylvania State University. Susan E. Cozzens, Ph.D., is a professor of public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology and director of its Technology Policy and Assessment Center. She is currently working on research in the fields of science, technology, and inequalities; and she continues to work internationally on developing methods for research assessment, as well as science and technology indicators. Before joining the faculty at the Georgia Institute of Technology, she was the director of the Office of Policy Support at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Cozzens has served as a consultant to numerous organizations, including the Office of Science and Technology Policy, NSF, the Office of Technology Assessment, the General Accounting Office, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Aging, and NIH. She has served on several NRC and IOM committees, including Evaluation of the Sea Grant Program Review Process, Assessment of Centers of Excellence Programs at NIH, and Research Standards and Practices to Prevent the Destructive Applica-

OCR for page 197
Hearing Loss Research at NIOSH: Reviews of Research Programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health tion of Biotechnology. Dr. Cozzens is the past editor of Science, Technology, & Human Values, the journal of the Society for Social Studies of Science. She currently is the co-editor of Research Evaluation. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University. Karen J. Cruickshanks, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences as well as in the Department of Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. She is the director of the Graduate Program in Population Health and the vice chair of the Department of Population Health Sciences. Her research interests are in the epidemiology of age-related sensory disorders, diabetes and its complications, and aging. She has written more than 100 articles on these topics and is the principal investigator for two major studies of the epidemiology of age-related hearing loss. Dr. Cruickshanks serves as frequent adviser or reviewer for the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) and as an ad hoc member of the NIH Neurological, Aging, and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology Study Section. She is a member of the Society for Epidemiological Research and the American Epidemiological Society. Dr. Cruickshanks previously served on the IOM Committee on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Tinnitus Associated with Military Service from World War II to the Present. She received her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh. Judy R. Dubno, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). She is also a member of the MUSC Center for Advanced Imaging Research. Her research focuses on human auditory system function, with emphasis on the encoding of auditory information in simple sounds and speech, and how these abilities change in adverse listening conditions, with age, and with hearing loss. This research is currently funded by NIDCD of NIH. Dr. Dubno’s other activities currently include serving as a member of the Executive Council of the Acoustical Society of America, the Tinnitus Research Consortium, and the Board of Directors of the Deafness Research Foundation. She previously served as a member of the National Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Council of the NIH, the NRC Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics (CHABA), and the IOM Committee on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Tinnitus Associated with Military Service from World War II to the Present. She is a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America and the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association. Dr. Dubno holds a Ph.D. in speech/hearing science from the City University of New York Graduate School and University Center.

OCR for page 197
Hearing Loss Research at NIOSH: Reviews of Research Programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Dennis A. Giardino, M.S., is an acoustic consultant specializing in evaluation of the noise environments of industrial and mining facilities. Previously, Mr. Giardino served as chief of the Physical and Toxic Agents Division of the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). During his time as chief, he was responsible for providing technical support in protecting the health and safety of all miners in the United States with respect to harmful noise and vibration exposures, as well as editing and reviewing the current MSHA noise regulation for mining in the United States, overseeing noise investigation at mining facilities throughout the United States, and establishing and managing all of MSHA’s primary acoustic laboratories. From 1973 to 1980, Mr. Giardino served as the chief of the Noise Branch of the U.S. Bureau of Mines, where he helped implement the then-new noise regulation for mining. He has published numerous research articles on noise associated with mining. Mr. Giardino received his master’s in physics from the University of Pittsburgh. Rena H. Glaser, M.A., retired as manager of medical surveillance for 3M Corporation in 2002, after nearly 30 years of service with the company in numerous capacities involving hearing conservation and occupational noise exposure. Ms. Glaser developed, managed, and led to international prominence the 3M hearing conservation program, with responsibility for more than 50 plants where more than 10,000 employees were enrolled in the program. Ms. Glaser is a member of the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA) and served as its president from 1984 to 1986. She received NHCA’s Michael B. Threadgill Award for Outstanding Leadership and Service in 1992. Ms. Glaser has also been a member of American Speech–Language–Hearing Association and was awarded fellowship in 1990. Other professional memberships have included the American Auditory Society, the American Academy of Audiology, and the Acoustical Society of America, as well as several state professional organizations. She served as chair of the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation, representing the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association. Ms. Glaser has been a frequent presenter and lecturer on occupational hearing conservation. She received her master’s in audiology from the University of Illinois at Champaign–Urbana. William W. Lang, Ph.D., currently serves as the president of the Noise Control Foundation and has held this position since 1975. Dr. Lang worked at the IBM Corporation from 1958 to 1992. While at IBM, he had corporate responsibility for the design of low-noise computers and business machines and for developing technical advances in the digital processing of acoustical signals. Dr. Lang has been involved extensively in international noise control engineering. He was a founding member of the Institute of Noise Control Engineering of the United States and co-

OCR for page 197
Hearing Loss Research at NIOSH: Reviews of Research Programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health founded the International Institute of Noise Control Engineering. Dr. Lang served as chair of the International Electrotechnical Commission–Technical Committee 29 on electroacoustics from 1975 to 1984, and he is currently serving as the convener of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Working Group on machinery noise emission standards. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on several NRC committees, including CHABA. Dr. Lang has authored or coauthored more than 50 technical publications and has been the editor of two books. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the Acoustical Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Audio Engineering Society, and the Institute of Acoustics. Dr. Lang holds a Ph.D. in physics and acoustics from Iowa State University. Laura C. Leviton, Ph.D., is a senior program officer of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She has overseen evaluations in most of the areas of focus for the foundation and now works primarily on initiatives in preventing childhood obesity and in serving vulnerable populations. Before joining the foundation she was a professor of public health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and, before that, a member of the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health. Dr. Leviton is a leading writer on evaluation methods and practice, in particular for disease prevention. She was president of the American Evaluation Association in the year 2000, coauthored a leading evaluation text, and serves on several editorial boards for evaluation journals. She received the 1993 award from the American Psychological Association for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest for her work in HIV prevention and health promotion at the workplace. She served on an IOM committee to evaluate preparedness for terrorist attacks and was a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Advisory Committee on HIV and STD (sexually transmitted disease) Prevention. She led a multihospital randomized trial to encourage the use of corticosteroid therapy in preterm infants and is a coinvestigator of a similar trial in conjunction with the Vermont–Oxford Network. She is coauthor of Foundations of Program Evaluation: Theorists and Their Theories and Confronting Public Health Risks. She received her Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Kansas and postdoctoral training in evaluation research from Northwestern University. Brenda L. Lonsbury-Martin, Ph.D., is a research professor in the Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, at Loma Linda University School of Medicine. Her research interests include the early detection of hearing loss using otoacoustic emissions, the role of the cochlear efferent sys-

OCR for page 197
Hearing Loss Research at NIOSH: Reviews of Research Programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health tem in protecting the ear from noise damage, mechanisms of noise- and drug-induced hearing loss, and cochlear plasticity. Dr. Lonsbury-Martin has been developing special-purpose protocols using otoacoustic emissions to evaluate, screen, and monitor the functional status of the hearing portion of the inner ear over the past 20 years. She is a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America and the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery (AAOHNS), and she is a member of the American Academy of Audiology, the American Auditory Society (AAS), the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association, the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, and the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Lonsbury-Martin is an associate editor of Physiological Acoustics/Peripheral Ear for the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America and a member of the editorial boards of Hearing Research and the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology. She also serves on the study section review panels of several private foundations, including AAOHNS and the Tinnitus Research Consortium, as well as serving on the AAS Board of Directors. Dr. Lonsbury-Martin received her Ph.D. in neuroscience and physiology from Oregon Health and Science University and completed postdoctoral fellowship training in psychobiology and physiology and biophysics at the University of California, Irvine, and the University of Washington, respectively. Michael A. Silverstein, M.D., M.P.H., is a clinical professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. He previously worked for the State of Washington, serving as the assistant director for industrial safety and health in the Department of Labor and Industries and as the state health officer in the Department of Health. He spent 2 years as the director of policy for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the U.S. Department of Labor and 15 years as the assistant director of health and safety at the United Automobile Workers International Union. Dr. Silverstein recently served as the chair of the Occupational Health and Safety Section of the American Public Health Association. He is a fellow of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Dr. Silverstein has previously served on several NRC committees, including the health and safety needs of older workers and the health and safety implications of child labor. He has an M.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine and an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan School of Public Health and is board certified in occupational medicine.

OCR for page 197
Hearing Loss Research at NIOSH: Reviews of Research Programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health FRAMEWORK COMMITTEE LIAISON Franklin E. Mirer, Ph.D., is the director of the Health and Safety Department for the United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW). His primary scientific interest is exposure and risk assessment in the occupational environment. Dr. Mirer has served on several National Academies committees, including Institutional Means for Risk Assessment, Risk Assessment Methodology, Review of the Health Effects Institute, and currently serves on the Review of NIOSH Research Programs. He has testified before House and Senate committees on occupational safety and health matters. Dr. Mirer was inducted into the National Safety Council’s Health and Safety Hall of Fame and is a fellow of the Collegium Ramazzini and the American Industrial Hygiene Association. He holds appointments as an adjunct professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, adjunct associate professor at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and visiting lecturer at the Harvard School of Public Health. He has a Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from Harvard University and is a toxicologist and certified industrial hygienist.

OCR for page 197
Hearing Loss Research at NIOSH: Reviews of Research Programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health This page intentionally left blank.