Appendix C
Biographical Sketches for Committee on River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey

Donald I. Siegel, Chair, is a professor of geology at Syracuse University, where he teaches graduate courses in hydrogeology and aqueous geochemistry. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in geology from the University of Rhode Island and Pennsylvania State University, respectively, and a Ph.D. in hydrogeology from the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in solute transport at both local and regional scales, wetland-ground water interaction, and paleohydrogeology. Dr. Siegel is a recipient of the O. E. Meinzer Award, presented by the Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America (GSA). He recently served as a counselor of GSA, and is an associate editor of the Hydrogeology Journal. He has been a member of numerous NRC committees, including the Committee on Wetlands Characterization, Committee on Techniques for Assessing Ground Water Vulnerability, and Committee on Review of the USGS National Streamflow Information Program.


A. Allen Bradley, Jr. is an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa and a research engineer at IIHR Hydroscience & Engineering. His research interests are in the areas of hydrology and hydrometeorology, including flood and drought hydrology, hydroclimate forecasting, and water resource applications of remote sensing. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from Virginia Tech, an M.S. in civil engineering from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin.


Martha H. Conklin is a professor and founding faculty member at the School of Engineering of the University of California, Merced. She was formerly a profes-



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River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey Appendix C Biographical Sketches for Committee on River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey Donald I. Siegel, Chair, is a professor of geology at Syracuse University, where he teaches graduate courses in hydrogeology and aqueous geochemistry. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in geology from the University of Rhode Island and Pennsylvania State University, respectively, and a Ph.D. in hydrogeology from the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in solute transport at both local and regional scales, wetland-ground water interaction, and paleohydrogeology. Dr. Siegel is a recipient of the O. E. Meinzer Award, presented by the Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America (GSA). He recently served as a counselor of GSA, and is an associate editor of the Hydrogeology Journal. He has been a member of numerous NRC committees, including the Committee on Wetlands Characterization, Committee on Techniques for Assessing Ground Water Vulnerability, and Committee on Review of the USGS National Streamflow Information Program. A. Allen Bradley, Jr. is an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa and a research engineer at IIHR Hydroscience & Engineering. His research interests are in the areas of hydrology and hydrometeorology, including flood and drought hydrology, hydroclimate forecasting, and water resource applications of remote sensing. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from Virginia Tech, an M.S. in civil engineering from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin. Martha H. Conklin is a professor and founding faculty member at the School of Engineering of the University of California, Merced. She was formerly a profes-

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River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey sor in the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources at the University of Arizona. Her research interests include biogeochemistry, metal cycling, surface-water and shallow groundwater interactions, organic chemical distribution in soil and groundwater, and chemical processes in snow. She received her B.A. in physics from Mount Holyoke College and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. Clifford S. Crawford is a professor emeritus of biology at the University of New Mexico (UNM). He received a B.A. in biology from Whitman College, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in entomology from Washington State College. After three years on the biology faculty at Portland State College, he spent the rest of his career at UNM. Until the mid-1980s his research dealt mainly with the biology of terrestrial arthropods in arid and semiarid ecosystems. Since then, he has focused on the riparian ecology of those regions, with emphasis on the functioning and management of the Rio Grande river forest (bosque). He led an interagency team that wrote the “Middle Rio Grande Ecosystem: Bosque Biological Management Plan” in 1993. He is now the director of the Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program, which involves the public in tracking long-term environmental change along the middle Rio Grande. Gerald E. Galloway is a research professor and professor of engineering at the Glen L. Martin Institute, University of Maryland, College Park. Before joining the University of Maryland, he was vice president of the Enterprise Engineering Group at the Titan Corporation in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. Galloway is a former secretary of the U.S. Section of the International Joint Commission. Dr. Galloway has served as a consultant on water resources engineering and management issues to the Executive Office of the President, the World Bank, the Organization of American States, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dr. Galloway is a former dean of the Academic Board (chief academic officer) of the U.S. Military Academy. Dr. Galloway holds M.S. degrees from Princeton, Penn State, and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Dr. Galloway received his Ph.D. degree in geography from the University of North Carolina. Marcelo H. Garcia is the Chester and Helen Siess Professor and director of the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a leader in the field of river mechanics, sediment transport, sedimentation engineering, and environmental hydraulics. He is best known for his research in sediment entrainment from riverbeds, flow and transport in vegetated channels, the mechanics of oceanic turbidity currents, and the dynamics of mudflows in mountain areas. He is author of the book Hydrodinamica Ambiental (Environmental Hydrodynamics) and has served as editor of the Journal of Hydraulic

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River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey Research (IAHR) since 2001. He holds a Ing. Dipl. from the Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina, in water resources and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, both in civil engineering. Richard E. Howitt is professor of economics at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Howitt’s research focuses on resource and environmental economics, quantitative methods, and econometrics. His interests include developing calibration methods based on maximum entropy estimators to model the economic structure of resource use from disaggregated physical data, including remote sensing methods, to infer the underlying economic functions. Much of his research has focused on California’s water resources, including water markets in the San Joaquin Valley and the Westlands Water District. He has published in such areas as river water quality, water use, water management, and water institutions. Dr. Howitt received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in economics from the University of California, Davis. Margaret A. Palmer is professor and director of the University of Maryland (UM) Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. She has also served as the director of the Ecology Program at the National Science Foundation (NSF), director of the Biological Sciences Program at UM, and visiting scientist at the Smithsonian Institution. Her activities and awards include Aldo Leopold Leadership fellow, Lilly fellow, AAAS fellow, Board of Trustees for the Chesapeake Bay Trust, Board of Advisers for the National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics, Board of Advisers for American Rivers, and Board of Advisers for the NSF Long Term Ecological Research Network. She studies a broad range of marine and freshwater ecological topics with a particular focus on restoration ecology and watershed science. Recent work includes research examining the link between biodiversity and ecological processes in freshwater ecosystems and the influence of global environmental change on biodiversity linkages between land and freshwater ecosystems. She has an undergraduate degree in biology from Emory University in Georgia and graduate degrees in oceanography from the University of South Carolina. John Pitlick is an associate professor in the Geography Department, University of Colorado-Boulder, and Faculty Affiliate of the Environmental Studies Program. Dr. Pitlick’s research interests are in the areas of surface-water hydrology and fluvial geomorphology. His research focuses on processes of sediment transport and channel change in both natural and altered river systems. The principal goal of this research is to develop process-based models coupling hydrology, sediment transport, and geomorphology across a continuum of scales. Additional research being done in collaboration with fisheries biologists and aquatic ecologists seeks a more detailed understanding of interactions between geomorphology and ecosystem processes, including food-web dynamics and nutrient cy-

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River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey cling. In addition to field-based research, he has initiated laboratory studies to model stream-channel response to flood flows, and completed a hydrologic analysis of the effects of post-1950 changes in temperature and precipitation on the timing and volume of runoff in rivers throughout the western United States. N. LeRoy Poff is an associate professor in the Biology Department of Colorado State University. Dr. Poff received a B.A. in biology from Hendrix College, an M.S. in environmental sciences from Indiana University in Bloomington, and a Ph.D. in biology from Colorado State University. His primary research interests are in stream and aquatic ecology and in quantifying the responses of riverine ecosystems to natural and altered hydrologic regimes, from local to watershed to regional scales. Dr. Poff has served as a member of the Adaptive Management Forum for CALFED river restoration projects, the Scientific Review Team for the King County (Seattle, Washington, Normative Flows Project, the Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee for American Rivers, and the Scientific Advisory Board of the David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellowship Program for The Nature Conservancy. He is also an Aldo Leopold leadership fellow of the Ecological Society of America. Stuart S. Schwartz is senior research scientist at the Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Before joining UMBC, Dr. Schwartz directed the Center for Environmental Science, Technology, and Policy at Cleveland State University, and served as associate director of the Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina. Dr. Schwartz served as an associate hydrologic engineer at the Hydrologic Research Center in San Diego, California, and directed the Section for Cooperative Water Supply Operations on the Potomac at the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. Dr. Schwartz’s research and professional interests are in the application of probabilistic hydrologic forecasting and multi-objective decision making in risk-based water resources management, watershed management, and water supply systems operations. He received his B.S. and M.S. in biology and geology, respectively, from the University of Rochester and Ph.D. in systems analysis from the Johns Hopkins University. David G. Tarboton is professor, Utah Water Research Laboratory and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Utah State University, where he also serves as coordinator for the Utah State University Initiative. His research interests are in spatially distributed hydrologic modeling, applying digital elevation data and Geographic Information Systems in hydrology, stochastic hydrology using nonparametric techniques, snow hydrology, geomorphology, landform evolution and channel networks, and terrain stability mapping and stream sediment inputs. Dr. Tarboton received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Natal in Durban, South Africa, in 1981, and an M.S. and Sc.D. in

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River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1987 and 1990, respectively. William W. Woessner is a Regent’s Professor of Hydrogeology in the Geoscience Department of the University of Montana, Missoula, and acting director for the Center for Riverine Science and Stream Renaturalization. His research concentrates on quantifying flow systems in intermountain valleys, resource analysis, ground water and surface-water interactions, characterization of hazardous wastes and contaminant transport including virus transport, and the use of groundwater flow models to evaluate conceptual models and make predictions. He is coauthor of a widely used and widely translated text Applied Groundwater Modeling. He received his B.A. in geology from the College of Wooster, an M.S. in geology from the University of Florida, and an M.S. in water resources management and a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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