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Original Study Task for Opportunities for U.S.-Russian Cooperation in Combating Radiological Terrorism

The statement of task from the contract with Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is as follows:


The National Academies shall support the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) for an 18-month period to develop recommendations for priorities for U.S.-Russian cooperation to be considered by DOE as it develops its program for countering the threats of radiological terrorism. The National Research Council (NRC) of the Academies will assemble a committee of U.S. experts to consider threats posed by radiological dispersal devices and specifically radioactive material packed with explosives. In addition, other methods of dispersing radioactive materials, such as in ventilations systems or environmental releases in air or water, will also be considered. The study will also consider the problem of intentional exposure of the public to harmful sources of ionizing radiation, such as at airports or subways.



After reviewing current DOE activities and related activities of other organizations and in consultation with Russian specialists, the NRC committee will prepare a report providing a road map for opportunities for Russian-American cooperation to help reduce the threat of radiological terrorism worldwide. The report will identify the types of threats of priority importance (e.g., public health, urban contamination, psychological apprehension), the potential Russian partners, and types of collaborative efforts (e.g., projects, studies, simulations, response strategies, educational exchanges, media communications). Interim briefings will also be provided to DOE at appropriate times during the project.



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U.S.–Russian Collaboration in Combating Radiological Terrorism A Original Study Task for Opportunities for U.S.-Russian Cooperation in Combating Radiological Terrorism The statement of task from the contract with Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is as follows: The National Academies shall support the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) for an 18-month period to develop recommendations for priorities for U.S.-Russian cooperation to be considered by DOE as it develops its program for countering the threats of radiological terrorism. The National Research Council (NRC) of the Academies will assemble a committee of U.S. experts to consider threats posed by radiological dispersal devices and specifically radioactive material packed with explosives. In addition, other methods of dispersing radioactive materials, such as in ventilations systems or environmental releases in air or water, will also be considered. The study will also consider the problem of intentional exposure of the public to harmful sources of ionizing radiation, such as at airports or subways. After reviewing current DOE activities and related activities of other organizations and in consultation with Russian specialists, the NRC committee will prepare a report providing a road map for opportunities for Russian-American cooperation to help reduce the threat of radiological terrorism worldwide. The report will identify the types of threats of priority importance (e.g., public health, urban contamination, psychological apprehension), the potential Russian partners, and types of collaborative efforts (e.g., projects, studies, simulations, response strategies, educational exchanges, media communications). Interim briefings will also be provided to DOE at appropriate times during the project.

OCR for page 93
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