D
Committee Biographies

Edwin P. Przybylowicz, Ph.D. (NAE), retired in 1991 after more than 35 years with the Eastman Kodak Company as senior vice president and director of research. He became assistant director of Kodak Research Laboratories in 1983, and was named director of research and elected senior vice president of the company in August 1985. Dr. Przybylowicz received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served as a commissioner of the U.S.-Polish Joint Fund for Cooperation in Science and Engineering, a program that fosters the collaboration of Polish and U.S. scientists, chairing conferences and workshops on technology transfer in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Russia. From 1994 to 1996, he was director of the Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is currently an elected member of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Bureau and Executive Committee, and is past chair of the U.S. National Committee for IUPAC. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1990 and has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) committees.


Penny Fenner-Crisp, Ph.D., is currently a private consultant. She received her Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. She recently retired from her position as executive director of the ILSI Risk Science Institute . Dr. Fenner-Crisp came to ILSI from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) where she was senior science adviser to the director of the Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP). In that capacity, she provided guidance and oversight for programmatic activities related to science and science



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Review of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program Administered by the Department of Energy and the Department of Health and Human Services D Committee Biographies Edwin P. Przybylowicz, Ph.D. (NAE), retired in 1991 after more than 35 years with the Eastman Kodak Company as senior vice president and director of research. He became assistant director of Kodak Research Laboratories in 1983, and was named director of research and elected senior vice president of the company in August 1985. Dr. Przybylowicz received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served as a commissioner of the U.S.-Polish Joint Fund for Cooperation in Science and Engineering, a program that fosters the collaboration of Polish and U.S. scientists, chairing conferences and workshops on technology transfer in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Russia. From 1994 to 1996, he was director of the Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is currently an elected member of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Bureau and Executive Committee, and is past chair of the U.S. National Committee for IUPAC. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1990 and has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) committees. Penny Fenner-Crisp, Ph.D., is currently a private consultant. She received her Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. She recently retired from her position as executive director of the ILSI Risk Science Institute . Dr. Fenner-Crisp came to ILSI from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) where she was senior science adviser to the director of the Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP). In that capacity, she provided guidance and oversight for programmatic activities related to science and science

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Review of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program Administered by the Department of Energy and the Department of Health and Human Services policy in OPP, particularly those related to implementation of the 1996 Food Quality Protection Act. Her responsibilities included many newly developed or updated human health risk assessment methodologies, the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program, OPP’s implementation of the agency peer-review policy, research planning, and preparation of agency staff for presentations before the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel and the EPA Science Advisory Board. At EPA, she also served as special assistant to the assistant administrator for the Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances; deputy director of the Office of Pesticide Programs; and director of the Health and Environmental Review Division of the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics. Dr. Fenner-Crisp has been involved in many international activities including serving as an expert on a number of World Health Organization (WHO) International Programme on Chemical Safety working groups charged with drafting environmental health criteria documents; on the WHO Expert Panel for the Joint Meeting on Pesticide Residues; as the lead U.S. delegate to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Endocrine Disrupter Testing and Assessment workgroup; and as lead U.S. delegate to the Expert Consultation on Acute Toxicity. R. William Field, Ph.D., M.S., is an associate professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health with a joint appointment in the Department of Epidemiology in the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa. He is also the director of the Occupational Epidemiology Training Program at the Heartland Center for Occupational Health and Safety, funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and co-director of the pulmonary outcomes core of the Environmental Health Sciences Research Center, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Science, both at the University of Iowa. He currently chairs a WHO working group tasked with recommending radon measurement and mitigation strategies for member countries and serves on several other radon-related WHO working groups. Dr. Field has been active in numerous national and international collaborative radiation-related epidemiolgic projects for many years and has served on the editorial boards of several national and international scientific journals. Dr. Field received his Ph.D. in preventive medicine and environmental health from the University of Iowa in 1994. His research interests fall into the broad categories of environmental epidemiology, occupational epidemiology, radioepidemiology, cancer epidemiology, immune-mediated disease epidemiology, health physics, biomonitoring, risk perception, and novel methods of retrospective exposure assessment. Sharon M. Friedman, M.A., B.A., is professor of journalism and communication and director of the science and environmental writing program at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. She received her M.A. in journalism from Pennsylvania State University in 1974, a graduate certificate in public rela-

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Review of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program Administered by the Department of Energy and the Department of Health and Human Services tions from American University in 1970, and her B.A. in biology from Temple University in 1964. Her research and consulting activities focus on how scientific, environmental, and health risk issues are communicated to the public. Professor Friedman chaired the Department of Energy’s Advisory Committee for its low-dose-radiation research program for 3 years. She has served as a consultant to the President’s Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and various U.S. government agencies and industries on environmental and risk communication. Elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 1989 for her contributions toward furthering the public understanding of science and technology, she served as a member of the AAAS Council for 6 years. She has written one book, co-edited two books, and authored numerous articles and book chapters. Professor Friedman is a member of the editorial advisory board of the journal Science Communication. She was a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Assessment of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Radiation Studies and was a member of its Committee on Improving Practices for Regulating and Managing Low-Activity Radioactive Waste. Helen Grogan, Ph.D., is the founder of a consulting company, Cascade Scientific, Inc. Dr. Grogan earned her Ph.D. from Imperial College of Science and Technology, University of London, in 1984. Previously, Dr. Grogan worked with the Paul Scherrer Institute (formerly the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research) as a member of the Repository Performance Assessment Group, where she was responsible for the biosphere modeling aspects of the safety assessment of both high-level waste and low-or intermediate-level waste repositories. At Cascade Scientific, Inc., Dr. Grogan has worked with the Risk Assessment Corporation (RAC) on a variety of projects including Phase I (data retrieval and assessment) and Phase II (source term calculation and ingestion pathway data retrieval) of the Savannah River Site Dose Reconstruction Project. Dr. Grogan worked with other subcontractors to RAC to develop a risk-based screening methodology for radionuclide releases to the Columbia River from past operations of the Hanford site. She also worked on Phase II of the Historical Public Exposures Studies on Rocky Flats, focusing on quantifying the organ-specific cancer incidence risk and its uncertainty following exposure to plutonium from inhalation. The Savannah River dose reconstructions and the Hanford dose reconstructions were a part of the dose reconstruction efforts of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Center for Environmental Health and, thus, were a component of the program to be reviewed in the present National Academies study. Dr. Grogan serves as a member of the EPA Science Advisory Board’s Radiation Advisory Committee.

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Review of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program Administered by the Department of Energy and the Department of Health and Human Services Jack Mandel, M.P.H., Ph.D., is Rollins Professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. He is also a Georgia Cancer Coalition distinguished cancer scholar. Dr. Mandel earned his M.P.H. and Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Mandel has an international reputation in epidemiology and is a leader in cancer screening research. He has conducted many case-control, cohort (both prospective and retrospective), cross-sectional, experimental, and methodological studies related to prostate, colorectal, kidney, pancreatic, breast, lung, stomach, hematopoietic, and skin cancers. His research interests in cancer epidemiology include etiologic and both primary and secondary prevention research. Dr. Mandel was previously group vice president at Exponent and prior to that served as the Mayo Chair and head of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. He is currently serving as chair of the CH2M HILL’s Health Effects Panel. The panel is tasked with evaluating health effects related to occupational exposures at the Hanford Site. Glenn Paulson, Ph.D., is professor in the Environmental and Occupational Health Department and associate dean for research at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey’s School of Public Health. Dr. Paulson earned his Ph.D. in environmental sciences and ecology from the Rockefeller University. In addition to having previously been research professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology and holding regular or adjunct faculty positions at the New School University, the Medical University of South Carolina, the State University of New York, and other colleges and universities, he served as assistant commissioner in the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, among other positions. He has served as member or chairman of numerous advisory boards for federal, state, and local agencies as well as nonprofit organizations. Dr. Paulson has also served on numerous National Academies study panels, including the Committee on Remediation of Buried and Tank Wastes, the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and the Committee on Remedial Action Priorities for Hazardous Waste Sites. Rosemary K. Sokas, M.D., M.O.H., M.Sc., is professor and director of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Division at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. She previously served in the office of the director of NIOSH as lead medical officer and associate director for science. While at NIOSH she led a team of senior scientists that coordinated institute policy and science, promoted the National Occupational Research Agenda, and developed NIOSH-wide initiatives, including ones to focus on health care workers and underserved minority workers. Prior to that, Dr. Sokas directed the Office of Occupational Medicine for the Occupational Safety and Health Administra-

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Review of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program Administered by the Department of Energy and the Department of Health and Human Services tion. She has previously served as professor of medicine and of health sciences at the George Washington University School of Medicine and School of Public Health and as assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research areas focus on intervention effectiveness projects for high-risk and low-wage workers. Dr. Sokas currently serves on the NRC Committee on the Review of NIOSH Research Programs. She earned her M.D. from Boston University and her M.O.H. and M.Sc. from the Harvard School of Public Health. Daniel O. Stram, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the University of Southern California. Dr. Stram earned his Ph.D. in statistics from Temple University and subsequently engaged in postdoctoral research in biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health. From 1986 to 1989 he was a member of the Statistics Department of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima. Since 1990, Dr. Stram has been a major participant in National Institutes of Health-funded clinical research in and epidemiology of childhood and adult cancers at the University of Southern California and the Children’s Oncology Group. He has special interest in the measurement error characteristics of radiation dosimetry systems and other exposure assessment methods when they are applied to epidemiological research. He was a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Assessment of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Radiation Studies and of the Board on Radiation Effects Research. Tongzhang Zheng, B.Med., Sc.D., Sc.M., is professor and head of the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health. His research interests have been in the area of cancer epidemiology, environmental epidemiology, and gene-environment interaction. Dr. Zheng is the principal investigator (PI) for two case-control studies: CYP1A1 genetic polymorphism, environmental exposure, and risk of breast cancer; and GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 genetic polymorphism and breast cancer risk. Dr. Zheng was the PI for case-control studies of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Connecticut and of organochlorine compounds and breast cancer risk in Connecticut women. Dr. Zheng has 100 publications, many of which report on health effects of chemical exposures. Dr. Zheng was a panel member on the National Academies Committee on Gulf War and Health: Review of the Literature on Pesticides and Solvents: Pesticide Panel.

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APPENDIX D 277 member of the Statistics Department of the Radiation Effects Research Founda- tion in Hiroshima. Since 1990, Dr. Stram has been a major participant in National Institutes of Health-funded clinical research in and epidemiology of childhood and adult cancers at the University of Southern California and the Children's Oncology Group. He has special interest in the measurement error characteristics of radiation dosimetry systems and other exposure assessment methods when they are applied to epidemiological research. He was a member of the National Academies' Committee on Assessment of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Radiation Studies and of the Board on Radiation Effects Research. Tongzhang Zheng, B.Med., Sc.D., Sc.M., is professor and head of the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health. His research interests have been in the area of cancer epidemiology, environmental epidemiol- ogy, and gene-environment interaction. Dr. Zheng is the principal investigator (PI) for two case-control studies: CYP1A1 genetic polymorphism, environmental exposure, and risk of breast cancer; and GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 genetic polymorphism and breast cancer risk. Dr. Zheng was the PI for case-control studies of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and Hodgkin's lym- phoma in Connecticut and of organochlorine compounds and breast cancer risk in Connecticut women. Dr. Zheng has 100 publications, many of which report on health effects of chemical exposures. Dr. Zheng was a panel member on the National Academies Committee on Gulf War and Health: Review of the Litera- ture on Pesticides and Solvents: Pesticide Panel.

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