women who would not donate their eggs for reproduction but who would donate for research.

In conclusion, Dr. Klock said, the main negative psychological effects on egg donors after their donation were the regret and worry that were present for a minority of donors. The regrets can best be dealt with through a better selection process, which keeps out those who are ambivalent about the donation and thus likely to feel regrets later on, while the worries are best dealt with by communication and further research. Research is also necessary to counter the limitations of the studies discussed today, which include small sample sizes, single center, and cross-sectional design. Multicenter, longitudinal studies are needed in this area. “It is incumbent on us,” she said, “to have meetings like this to review what the potential risks are and then communicate them to the women to the extent that we know them at the time. We need to continue to study and follow up on women who have gone through donation cycles to know what the potential risks are and how to counsel them appropriately.”

SUMMARY: WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE PSYCHOLOGICAL RISKS OF OOCYTE DONATION

There are three main categories of psychological risk associated with donating eggs: issues associated with the screening process, problems surrounding the donation procedure itself, and the post-donation adjustment to the donation.

The main risk in the first category is that the screening process may reveal some previously unknown psychological or medical condition that disqualifies the woman from donating and that is uncomfortable or psychologically threatening to the applicant.

During the donation process, women report mood swings and irritability caused by the fertility drugs, pain caused by their injection, and anxiety in anticipation of the surgical procedure. The issues disappear after the procedure is complete.

After the eggs have been donated, the main psychological issues that donors experience are related to worries about future fertility and concerns about children conceived from their eggs. The latter will clearly not



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