III
APPENDIXES



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium III APPENDIXES

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium This page intentionally left blank.

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium Appendix A Biographies of Speakers* ALICE H. AMSDEN Alice H. Amsden is the Barton L. Weller Professor of Political Economy at MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Professor Amsden’s research interests focus on economic and industrial development. She has recently done a research project with the Asian Development Bank Institute on research and development by foreign firms in developing countries. She is currently working with the ADBI on a project on the Indian software industry. Dr. Amsden recently received the Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought, awarded by Tufts University’s Global Development and Environment Institute Scientific American Top 50 Visionaries. Her selected recent publications include Beyond Late Development: Taiwan’s Upgrading Policies, coauthored with Wan-wen Chu (MIT Press, June 2003); The Rise of “the Rest”: Challenges to the West from Late-Industrializing Countries (Oxford University Press, 2001); The Market Meets its Match: Restructuring the Economies of Eastern Europe, coauthored with Jacek Kochanowicz and Lance Taylor (Harvard University Press, 1994); and Asia’s Next Giant: South Korea and Late Industrialization (Oxford, 1989), which won the prize of Best Book in Political Economy in 1992 from the American Political Science Association. Additionally, Dr. Amsden has served as a consultant with the World Bank, OECD, and various United Nations organizations. She has written extensively on problems of industrial transformation in East Africa, East Asia, and Eastern Europe. * As of April 2005.

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium HSIN-SEN CHU Hsin-Sen Chu is the executive vice president of the Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) in Taiwan. ITRI is a nonprofit R&D organization whose mission is to engage in applied research and technical services to accelerate the industrial development of Taiwan; develop key, compatible, forward-looking technologies to meet industrial needs and strengthen industrial competitiveness; disseminate research results to the industrial sector in a timely and appropriate manner, in accordance with the principles of fairness and openness; foster the technology development of small- and medium-sized businesses; and cultivate industrial technology human resources for the benefit of the nation. Dr. Chu has served with ITRI since 2001, first as vice president and general director for Energy and Resources Laboratories before assuming his current position in 2004. He has held several R&D related positions, including serving as director of the High Efficiency Energy Technology Research Center at National Chiao Tung University from 2000 to 2001; director of the Mechanical Manufacturing & Heat Flow Research Center at National Chiao Tung University from 1999 to 2001; chief of staff at National Chiao Tung University from 1995 to 1998; vice dean of the College of Engineering at National Chiao Tung University from 1992 to 1993; chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at National Chiao Tung University from 1991 to 1995; professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at National Chiao Tung University from 1989 to the present; visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley from 1985 to 1986; and associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at National Chiao Tung University from 1984 to 1989. Dr. Chu has received many research awards in recognition of his contributions, including the Distinguished Research Award from the National Science Council of Taiwan in 1999; the Distinguished Engineering Professor Award from the Chinese Society of Mechanical Engineering and the Chinese Society of Engineers, R.O.C in 1998; the Excellent Young Engineer Award from the Chinese Society of Mechanical Engineering, R.O.C. in 1991; and the Excellent Research Award from the National Science Council, R.O.C. 1988-1993. He was named in the 1997 Marquis Who’s Who in the World and has published 60 technical journal papers, 44 conference papers, and 30 technical reports in his career. Dr. Chu received his B.S. in 1974, M.S. in 1977, and Ph.D. in 1982 from National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, R.O.C. He was named an Honorary Member of Phi Tau Phi in 1977 at National Cheng Kung University. CARL J. DAHLMAN Carl J. Dahlman, is the Luce Professor of International Affairs and Information Technology at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He joined Georgetown in January 2005 after more than 25 years of distinguished service at the World Bank.

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium At Georgetown, Dr. Dahlman’s research and teaching will explore how rapid advances in science, technology and information are affecting the growth prospects of nations and influencing trade, investment, innovation, education and economic relations in an increasingly globalizing world. At the World Bank Dr. Dahlman served as senior advisor to the World Bank Institute. In this role he managed the Knowledge for Development (K4D) program, an initiative providing training on the strategic use of knowledge for economic and social development to business leaders and policy makers in developing countries. Prior to developing the K4D program, Dr. Dahlman served as staff director of the 1998-1999 World Development Report, Knowledge for Development. In addition, he was the Bank’s Resident Representative and Financial Sector Leader in Mexico from 1994 to 1997, years during which the country coped with one of the biggest financial crises in its history. Before his position in Mexico, Dr. Dahlman had led divisions in the Bank’s Private Sector Development, and Industry and Energy Departments. He has also conducted extensive analytical work in major developing countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, India, Pakistan, China, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. Dr. Dahlman’s publications include India and the Knowledge Economy: Leveraging Strengths and Opportunities (2005), China and the Knowledge Economy: Seizing the 21st Century (2001), and Korea and the Knowledge-Based Economy: Making the Transition (2000). He is currently finishing a knowledge economy study on Mexico, working on a book on the challenge of the knowledge economy for education and training in China, and collaborating with research teams in Finland, Japan, and Korea to produce books on each country’s innovation and development strategies. Dr. Dahlman earned a B.A. magna cum laude in international relations from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University. He has also taught courses at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. LEWIS S. EDELHEIT Lewis S. (Lonnie) Edelheit retired in 2001 from his position as senior vice president, Corporate R&D, General Electric Company. Under his leadership, GE introduced numerous new leadership products, including digital X-ray and advanced ultrasound medical imagers, high-efficiency turbines for power generation, advanced lighting and electronics-based appliances and weatherable plastics to name a few. Other highlights of his tenure include significant advances in high-technology services and Internet applications and Corporate R&D’s leadership of the Design for Six Sigma quality and e-Engineering initiatives throughout the GE businesses. Also under his leadership, Corporate R&D vastly expanded its global resources with the development of new technology centers in Bangalore, India, and Shanghai, China. Dr. Edelheit began his professional career in 1969

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium as a physicist at the GE R&D Center, where he made significant contributions to fast-scan, “fan-beam” computed tomography x-ray systems. In 1976, Dr. Edelheit transferred to GE Medical Systems in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he rose to such positions as general manager of engineering and general manager of the Computed Tomography Programs Department, where he held marketing and profit-and-loss responsibility for GE’s worldwide computed tomography scanning business. In 1986, Dr. Edelheit left GE to become president and CEO of Quantum Medical Systems, a venture capital-backed company that pioneered color flow ultrasound for vascular imaging. He continued in that position after Quantum was acquired by the Siemens Corporation. In 1991 he returned to GE and assumed leadership of Corporate R&D. Dr. Edelheit earned a B.S. degree in engineering physics and an M.S. degree and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Illinois. In 1995, he received the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign College of Engineering Alumni Award for Distinguished Service. Dr. Edelheit is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Industrial Research Institute (named as the 2003 Medalist), and a fellow of the American Physical Society, which selected him as the recipient of the 2001 George E. Pake prize. He is on advisory boards of the Physics Department and Bio Engineering Department of the University of Washington and of the Harvard Medical and Beth Israel Deaconess Shapiro Research and Education Institute in Boston. He is also on the board of directors of two public corporations, Silicon Graphics, and Sonic Innovation, two private corporate boards, and is chair of the Laboratory Advisory Committee of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. KENNETH FLAMM Kenneth Flamm is the Dean Rusk Professor of International Affairs at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Flamm is a 1973 honors graduate of Stanford University and received a Ph.D. in economics from M.I.T. in 1979. From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Flamm served as principal deputy assistant secretary of Defense for Economic Security and special assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Dual Use Technology Policy. He was awarded the Department’s Distinguished Public Service Medal in 1995 by Defense Secretary William J. Perry. Prior to his service at the Defense Department, he spent eleven years as a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. Dr. Flamm has been a professor of economics at the Instituto Tecnológico A. de México in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and George Washington University. He has also been an adviser to the Director General of Income Policy in the Mexican Ministry of Finance and a consultant to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the World Bank,

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium the National Academy of Sciences, the Latin American Economic System, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S Agency for International Development, and the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress. Among Dr. Flamm’s publications are Mismanaged Trade? Strategic Policy and the Semiconductor Industry (1996), Changing the Rules: Technological Change, International Competition, and Regulation in Communications (ed., with Robert Crandell, 1989), Creating the Computer (1988), and Targeting the Computer (1987). He is currently working on an analytical study of the post-Cold War defense industrial base. Dr. Flamm, an expert on international trade and high-technology industry, teaches classes in microeconomic theory, international trade, and defense economics. THOMAS R. HOWELL Thomas R. Howell is a partner with the Washington, D.C., law office of Dewey Ballantine LLP, where he specializes in international trade matters. Since 1981 he has written extensively on industrial, trade, and technology polices in countries outside of the United States. In 2003, he prepared a report for the Semiconductor Industry Association, China’s Emerging Semiconductor Industry: The Impact of China’s Preferential Value-Added Tax on Current Investment Trends. DAVID K. KAHANER David K. Kahaner is the founding director of the Asian Technology Information Program (ATIP), which was established in 1994. He was formerly the associate director of the U.S. Office of Naval Research Asia. He also spent more than twenty years at the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (formerly the National Bureau of Standards) and a dozen years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Kahaner has been examining information rich technologies in Asia for many years. His analyses are circulated worldwide to thousands in industry, government, and academia. They are reprinted in many journals as well as often quoted in major news media, and he consults and lectures frequently on those topics both in and outside of the region. In 1993, he was awarded the title of “Mr. Asia” by Computerworld. One of his goals is to help Westerners understand opportunities and issues associated with science-based activities in the Asian region. Dr. Kahaner has been the Asian chair for a variety of international conferences and chair of the International Organizing Committees for the conference series HPC-Asia, which has been held seven times in as many different Asian cities since 1995. Separately, Dr. Kahaner also has many years of research expe-

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium rience in scientific computing and applications. Many of the applications he and his groups developed are used in scientific computing centers worldwide, and he has received several national awards for this work. He is the author of two well known textbooks and more than 50 refereed research papers. He has edited a column on scientific applications of computers, and has held numerous journal editorial and associate editorial positions. He has had visiting professorships at major universities in the U.S, Austria, Italy, and Switzerland, where he has taken extensive sabbaticals and still retains significant associations. BRADLEY KNOX Bradley Knox is the chief counsel for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Small Business, serving in the number-three management and policy role under the chief of staff and deputy chief of staff/policy director. Mr. Knox joined the committee in early 2003 as oversight counsel, responsible for oversight of federal agencies in government procurement and other matters, and served as staff manager of the chairman’s initiative to revitalize the U.S. manufacturing base. During the 1990s, Mr. Knox was an Air Force JAG officer for six years and then in active reserves, taught at the Air Force JAG School on the legal aspects of information warfare and homeland security for two years. He spent his last two years as a reservist assigned as legal counsel to the Joint Task Force on Global Network Attack. Mr. Knox began his professional career with Shell Oil as a computer programmer and analyst. He was cofounder and president of DigiTech System Solutions, an info-tech services company headquartered in Montgomery, Alabama. He is cofounder and vice president of Knox Global Network, a business-to-business and business-to-consumer e-commerce franchise. Mr. Knox was honored as one of the Top 40 business leaders under the age of 40 in Central Alabama, and DigiTech was named one of Montgomery’s Emerging Businesses in 2002. He earned a B.S. in information systems at Oral Roberts University and a J.D. at Regent University. HEIKKI KOTILAINEN Heikki Kotilainen is the deputy director general of Tekes, the Finnish National Technology Agency. He has a degree of Dr. of Techn. in mechanical engineering from Helsinki University of Technology. He has studied in Germany and Austria and worked in industry, research institutes, and public administration. For over 16 years he has worked in financing R&D in industry and universities, participated in formulating government technology and innovation policy, coordinated national technology programs and international cooperation, and served as a member of many domestic and international (EU, Nordic) technology and

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium innovation committees and boards. Serving in the United States from 1993 to 1995 gave him a very thorough insight into the research and high-tech industry developments (MIT, Harvard, Boston Route 128). From 2000 to 2003, he was the head of the EUREKA Secretariat in Brussels, running the industrial cooperation platform in Europe among 31 countries and participating in the ERA discussions from the innovation point of view. In recent years, his duty has been the strategic planning of the National Technology Agency, Tekes, as the deputy director general. Part of his work is to look for the best practices in leading technology and innovation policy countries. Lately, he has been lecturing in many countries about technology and innovation policy and management. STEFAN KUHLMANN Stefan Kuhlmann, a political scientist, is director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Systems Innovation Research (ISI), Karlsruhe, Germany. He is also professor of Innovation Policy Analysis at the Copernicus Institute, Innovation Studies Group, University of Utrecht, the Netherlands. He has more than 15 years background in the assessment and analysis of research and innovation policies. Dr. Kuhlmann has published widely in the field of research and innovation policy studies. He is an associate editor of the International Journal of Foresight and Innovation Policy (IJFIP), and serves on the editorial advisory board of Evaluation: The International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, edited in association with The Tavistock Institute, London, UK, since 2000. Recent publications include Changing Governance of Research and Technology Policy: the European Research Area, Cheltenham (E. Elgar) 2003 (coedited with J. Edler and M. Behrens); Learning from Science and Technology Policy Evaluation: Experiences from the United States and Europe, Cheltenham (E. Elgar) 2003 (co-edited with Ph. Shapira); “Evaluation of research and innovation policies: a discussion of trends with examples from Germany,” International Journal of Technology Management (26, Nos. 2/3/4, 2003); and “Governance of Innovation Policy in Europe: Three Scenarios,” Research Policy (30, June 2001). Dr. Kuhlmann is a member of many professional or academic associations in the area of research and innovation policy analysis, including the Executive the Executive Committee European Network of Excellence PRIME (Policies for Research and Innovation on the Move towards the European Research Area); the European Commission’s High-level Expert Group on “Maximising the wider benefits of competitive basic research funding at European level” (Directorate General Research); the European RTD Evaluation Network of the European Commission, Directorate General Research; the Netherlands Graduate School of Science, Technology and Modern Culture (WTMC); the steering committee of the Six Countries Programme—The International Innovation Network; the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Helsinki Institute of Science and Technology Studies (HIST);

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium and the Board of the German Evaluation Association (DeGEval), on which he served from 1997 to 2001. JOHN H. MARBURGER John H. Marburger, III, science adviser to the President and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, was born on Staten Island, N.Y., grew up in Maryland near Washington, D.C., and attended Princeton University (B.A., physics, 1962) and Stanford University (Ph.D., applied physics, 1967). Before his appointment in the Executive Office of the President, he served as director of Brookhaven National Laboratory from 1998, and as the third president of the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1980-1994). He came to Long Island in 1980 from the University of Southern California where he had been a professor of physics and electrical engineering, serving as Physics Department chairman and dean of the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in the 1970s. In the fall of 1994 he returned to the faculty at Stony Brook, teaching and doing research in optical science as a university professor. Three years later he became president of Brookhaven Science Associates, a partnership between the university and Battelle Memorial Institute that competed for and won the contract to operate Brookhaven National Laboratory. While at the University of Southern California, Dr. Marburger contributed to the rapidly growing field of nonlinear optics, a subject created by the invention of the laser in 1960. He developed theory for various laser phenomena and was a cofounder of the University of Southern California’s Center for Laser Studies. His teaching activities included “Frontiers of Electronics,” a series of educational programs on CBS television. Dr. Marburger’s presidency at Stony Brook coincided with the opening and growth of University Hospital and the development of the biological sciences as a major strength of the university. During the 1980s, federally sponsored scientific research at Stony Brook grew to exceed that of any other public university in the northeastern United States. During his presidency, Dr. Marburger served on numerous boards and committees, including chair of the governor’s commission on the Shoreham Nuclear Power facility, and chair of the 80 campus Universities Research Association, which operates Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory near Chicago. He served as a trustee of Princeton University and many other organizations. He also chaired the highly successful 1991-92 Long Island United Way campaign. As a public spirited scientist-administrator, Dr. Marburger has served local, state, and federal governments in a variety of capacities. He is credited with bringing an open, reasoned approach to contentious issues where science intersects with the needs and concerns of society. His strong leadership of Brookhaven National Laboratory following a series of environmental and management crises

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium is widely acknowledged to have won back the confidence and support of the community while preserving the laboratory’s record of outstanding science. MARK B. MYERS Mark B. Myers is visiting executive professor in the Management Department at the Wharton Business School, the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include identifying emerging markets and technologies to enable growth in new and existing companies with special emphases on technology identification and selection, product development, and technology competencies. Dr. Myers serves on the Science, Technology and Economic Policy Board of the National Research Council and cochaired, with Richard Levin, the president of Yale, the National Research Council’s study of “Intellectual Property in the Knowledge Based Economy.” Dr. Myers retired from the Xerox Corporation at the beginning of 2000, after a 36-year career in its research and development organizations. He was the senior vice president in charge of corporate research, advanced development, systems architecture, and corporate engineering from 1992 to 2000. His responsibilities included the corporate research centers, PARC in Palo Alto, California; Webster Center for Research & Technology near Rochester, New York; Xerox Research Centre of Canada, Mississauga, Ontario; and the Xerox Research Centre of Europe in Cambridge, UK, and Grenoble, France. During this period he was a member of the senior management committee in charge of the strategic direction setting of the company. Dr. Myers is chair of the board of trustees of Earlham College and has held visiting faculty positions at the University of Rochester and at Stanford University. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Earlham College and a doctorate from Pennsylvania State University. PETER J. NICHOLSON Peter J. Nicholson is Deputy Chief of Staff–Policy, Office of the Prime Minister of Canada. A native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, he holds a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in physics from Dalhousie University and a Ph.D. in operations research from Stanford University, as well as honorary doctorates from Acadia University, Dalhousie and the Université du Québec (INRS). After post-doctoral work in France, Dr. Nicholson joined the Computer Science Department at the University of Minnesota in 1969 where he taught four years before joining the Government of Canada in 1973. There he served in a senior policy advisory role in the Departments of Urban Affairs, Transport, and Regional Economic Expansion. In 1978, Dr. Nicholson left Ottawa and was elected to the Legislature of the Province of Nova Scotia. At the time, he became associated with H. B. Nickerson & Sons, a major fisheries company, and eventually left the Legislature to devote

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium full-time to the company as a vice president. In 1982, he joined the Taskforce on Atlantic Fisheries established by the federal government to restructure the industry, which had been financially devastated by the 1981-1982 recession. In 1984 Dr. Nicholson joined The Bank of Nova Scotia in Toronto where he was senior vice president, advising the chair of the bank on a broad range of strategic issues, including in particular the resolution of the Latin American debt crisis in the late 1980s. Between March 1994 and September 1995, Dr. Nicholson was Clifford Clark Visiting Economist in the federal Department of Finance under the government’s executive interchange program. This is a senior advisory position to Canada’s Minister and Deputy Minister of Finance. From September 1995 to June 2002, he was chief strategy officer of BCE, Inc., Canada’s largest telecommunications company. Between June 2002 and July 2003, he was special adviser to the Secretary-General of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris. He joined the Prime Minister’s Office in December 2003. Dr. Nicholson is a member of the Order of Canada, in recognition of his contribution to business through both the public and private sectors. HIDEO SHINDO Hideo Shindo is the chief representative of New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) in its Washington, D.C. office, where he has served since July 2004. NEDO is a Japanese semigovernment nonprofit organization whose objective is to facilitate R&D activities in industries in Japan, in close cooperation with Japanese government agencies such as METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry). Mr. Shindo entered METI in 1986 and dealt with a variety of policy issues such as technology development, international trade and investment, and codes and standards. In 2003 he was transferred to NEDO headquarters and assisted in its restructuring as an incorporated administrative agency. WILLIAM J. SPENCER William J. Spencer was named chairman emeritus of the SEMATECH Board in November 2000 after serving as chairman of the SEMATECH and International SEMATECH Boards since July 1996. He came to SEMATECH in October 1990 as president and chief executive officer. He continued to serve as president until January 1997 and as CEO until November 1997. During this time, SEMATECH became totally privately funded and expanded to include non-U.S. members. Many analysts credit SEMATECH with making a major contribution to the recovery of the U.S. semiconductor industry in the 1990s and its recapture of market share.

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium Dr. Spencer has held key research positions at Xerox Corporation, Bell Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories. Before joining SEMATECH in October 1990, he was group vice president and senior technical officer at Xerox Corporation in Stamford, Connecticut, from 1986 to 1990. He established new research centers in Europe and developed a plan for Xerox retaining ownership in spinout companies from research. Prior to joining the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) as manager of the Integrated Circuit Laboratory in 1981 and as the center manager of PARC in 1982 to 1986, Dr. Spencer served as director of Systems Development from 1978 to 1981 at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, and director of Microelectronics at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque from 1973 to 1978, where he developed a silicon processing facility for Department of Energy needs. He began his career in 1959 at Bell Laboratories. Dr. Spencer received the Regents Meritorious Service Medal from the University of New Mexico in 1981; the C. B. Sawyer Award for contribution to “The Theory and Development of Piezoelectric Devices” in 1972; and a Citation for Achievement from William Jewell College in 1969, where he also received an doctor of science degree in 1990. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of IEEE, and serves on numerous advisory groups and boards. He was the Regents Professor at the University of California in the spring of l998. He has been a visiting professor at the University of California at Berkeley School of Engineering and the Haas School of Business since the fall of 1998. He is a research professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Spencer received an A.B. degree from William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, an M.S. degree in mathematics and a Ph.D. in physics from Kansas State University. MARC G. STANLEY Marc G. Stanley currently serves as director of the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Mr. Stanley served as the associate director for the program from 1993 to 2001. Before coming to NIST, Mr. Stanley was the Associate Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce by Presidential appointment. He has served as a senior policy advisor to NIST directors, as a consultant to the Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration, and as Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs at the Department of Commerce. Mr. Stanley earned a B.A. from George Washington University and a bachelor of law degree from the University of Baltimore.

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium J. PACE VANDEVENDER J. Pace VanDevender is vice president of Science & Technology and Partnerships and chief technology officer at Sandia National Laboratories. He is also chief scientific officer for the nuclear weapons program at the laboratory and is accountable for Sandia’s partnership program with industry and the university community. Dr. VanDevender leads and/or manages the research, development and engineering in nanosciences, materials and process sciences, microelectronics/microsystems and optoelectronics, advanced manufacturing, computational sciences, modeling and simulation science, and high-energy density physics. In 1974, he joined Sandia as a member of the technical staff. Dr. VanDevender became division supervisor in 1978, manager of the Fusion Department in 1982, and director of Pulsed Power Sciences in 1984. In the latter position, which he held into the 1990s, he oversaw Sandia’s pulsed power R&D, inertial confinement fusion research, nuclear weapons effects simulations, directed energy weapons R&D, and commercial applications of pulsed power. In 1992, Dr. VanDevender received DoE’s prestigious E.O. Lawrence Award, “for his outstanding contributions to the generation of pulsed power,” becoming only the fifth Sandian to receive that award. In 2003, he was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also a fellow of the American Physical Society and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. As director of executive staff at Sandia National Laboratories, Dr. VanDevender was in charge of governance initiatives, strategic planning, government relations, quality assurance, laboratory assessment, issues management, and the support of the Sandia Executives. Before becoming the executive staff director, Dr. VanDevender was the chief information officer and was responsible for the information infrastructure, for cyber security, and for making information technology a compelling advantage for doing science, engineering, and manufacturing. He has also been the director of the Strategic Sciences Center, National Industrial Alliance Center, Corporate Communications Center, and Pulsed Power Sciences Center. Dr. VanDevender earned a Ph.D. in physics from the Imperial College of Science and Technology, University of London, England in 1974, where he was a Marshall Scholar; an M.A. in physics from Dartmouth College in 1971; and a B.A. in physics from Vanderbilt University in 1969. CHARLES W. WESSNER Charles W. Wessner is an internationally recognized expert on innovation policy, serves as the National Research Council director for Comparative Innovation Policy: Best Practice in National Technology Programs, and is responsible for organizing this conference. He directs several other studies at the National

OCR for page 177
Innovation Policies for the 21st Century: Report of a Symposium Academies, notably Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy and Capitalizing on Science Technology, and Innovation: An Assessment of the Small Business Innovation Research Program. Dr. Wessner’s expertise centers on public-private partnerships, early-stage financing for new firms, university-industry partnerships, and high-tech clusters, as well as the special needs and benefits of high-technology industry. Dr. Wessner is regularly consulted by congressional staff and testifies to the Congress and major national commissions, acts as an advisor to agencies of the U.S. Government, international organizations such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and leading technology agencies in Europe and Asia, and lectures at major universities in the United States and abroad. He previously worked in the U.S. Treasury Department, served overseas with the OECD and the U.S. State Department, and directed the Office of International Technology Policy at the Department of Commerce. Dr. Wessner earned an M.A., M.A.L.D., and Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.