Appendix B
Panel Biographies

CHAIR

George Stephanopoulos (NAE) is the Arthur D. Little Professor of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include product and process development and design, process operations and control, and integrated computer-aided environments for process systems engineering. He was the Director of MIT-LISPE (Laboratory for Intelligent Systems in Process Engineering) and he has advised numerous chemical and engineering systems companies in the United States, Europe, and Japan. During the period 2000-2006 he served as Chief Technology Officer and Board Member of Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, Japan. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida, ME from McMaster University, and a diploma of chemical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens.

MEMBERS

Pierre Avenas is delegate for research in ParisTech (Paris Institute of Technology), an association which brings together 11 French engineering universities located in or near Paris. He is the former head of research and development for Atofina Chemicals. He is also a member of the IDEA League working group on research. IDEA League is a strategic alliance between Imperial College London, TU Delft, ETH Zürich, RWTH Aachen, and ParisTech.



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International Benchmarking of U.S. Chemical Engineering Research Competitiveness Appendix B Panel Biographies CHAIR George Stephanopoulos (NAE) is the Arthur D. Little Professor of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include product and process development and design, process operations and control, and integrated computer-aided environments for process systems engineering. He was the Director of MIT-LISPE (Laboratory for Intelligent Systems in Process Engineering) and he has advised numerous chemical and engineering systems companies in the United States, Europe, and Japan. During the period 2000-2006 he served as Chief Technology Officer and Board Member of Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, Japan. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida, ME from McMaster University, and a diploma of chemical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens. MEMBERS Pierre Avenas is delegate for research in ParisTech (Paris Institute of Technology), an association which brings together 11 French engineering universities located in or near Paris. He is the former head of research and development for Atofina Chemicals. He is also a member of the IDEA League working group on research. IDEA League is a strategic alliance between Imperial College London, TU Delft, ETH Zürich, RWTH Aachen, and ParisTech.

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International Benchmarking of U.S. Chemical Engineering Research Competitiveness William F. Banholzer (NAE) is Corporate Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of The Dow Chemical Company, located in Midland, Michigan. He is a member of the Office of the Chief Executive (OCE) and leads Dow’s research and development activities across the globe. Banholzer joined Dow in July 2005 from General Electric Company, where he was Vice President of Global Technology at GE Advanced Materials, responsible for worldwide technology and engineering. Banholzer holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Marquette University and earned master’s and doctorate degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois. Gary S. Calabrese is Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of Rohm & Haas Company, responsible for a 2000+ member global technical organization of scientists, engineers and technicians with over 30 worldwide locations, including a new research center in China. Prior to joining Rohm & Haas, Dr. Calabrese began his industrial career at Polaroid Corporation in 1983 as a research chemist. In 1989 he joined the Shipley Company to work as a group leader in new product development. In 1992 Shipley became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rohm and Haas, and in 1994 Dr. Calabrese was named Shipley’s North American Director of Engineering, responsible for scaling up manufacturing processes for new products, customer technical support, and plant engineering. He returned to product development in 1997 as Global Director of R&D for the Microelectronics Materials business, and was named Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for what is now known as Rohm & Haas Electronic Materials two years later. In this position he was responsible for a global technology organization with more than 300 members in seven locations including Japan and Korea. Dr. Calabrese earned his BS in chemistry from Lehigh University, and his Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Douglas S. Clark is Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley. His research is in the field of biochemical engineering, with particular emphasis on enzyme technology and bioactive materials, extremophiles and extremophilic enzymes, cell culture, and metabolic flux analysis. He received a B.S. from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. L. Louis Hegedus (NAE) retired in 2006, after 10 years of service, as the Senior Vice President of Research and Development for Arkema, Inc., a diversified chemical company headquartered in Paris. He was responsible for all R&D in North America and R&D coordination between the United States and France. His previous career positions include 16 years with W. R. Grace, where he was a Research Vice President for Specialty Chemicals,

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International Benchmarking of U.S. Chemical Engineering Research Competitiveness and 8 years with the General Motors Research Laboratories, where he contributed to the development of the catalytic converter for automobile emission control. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley and an MS in chemical engineering from the Technical University of Budapest. Dr. Hegedus is a past Chairman of the chemical engineering section of the NAE, and a past Chairman of the Council for Chemical Research. Eric W. Kaler is the Dean of the College of Engineering and the Elizabeth Inez Kelley Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware. Dr. Kaler’s research focuses on colloid and surfactant science and engineering, complex fluid dynamics, materials synthesis, and small angle scattering. He also has an interest in polymer science, and has worked on all varieties of surfactant materials and structures, including emulsions, microemulsions, micelles, vesicles, and liposomes. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and his bachelor’s from the California Institute of Technology. Julio M. Ottino (NAE) is currently Dean of the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Northwestern University and holds the titles of Distinguished Robert R. McCormick Institute Professor and Walter P. Murphy Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering. He was Chairman of the department of Chemical Engineering during 1992-2000. Ottino’s research has impacted fields as diverse as fluid dynamics, granular dynamics, microfluidics, geophysical sciences, and nonlinear dynamics and chaos and has appeared on the covers of and Nature, Science, Scientific American, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the US. He is currently a senior advisor to Unilever, was a member of the Technical Board of Dow Chemical, and was a member of the 2004 EPSRC/Royal Academy International Review of Engineering in the United Kingdom. Dr. Ottino received the Alpha Chi Sigma Award and William H. Walker of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and was the Danckwerts Lecturer in London. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a Sigma Xi Lecturer, and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Nicholas A. Peppas (NAE) is the Fletcher S. Pratt Chair in Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin with appointments in Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Pharmacy. He is also the Director of the Center on Biomaterials, Drug Delivery and Bionanotechnology. He has collaborated with numerous international companies in the polymers, pharmaceutical, and medical fields and has been a visiting professor at

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International Benchmarking of U.S. Chemical Engineering Research Competitiveness the universities of Paris, Berlin, Geneva, Parma, Naples, Pavia, Athens, Hacettepe (Ankara), Hebrew (Jerusalem), Hoshi (Tokyo) and Nanyang (Singapore). He is the cofounder of several biotechnology companies. He received a diploma of engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece and a ScD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, both in chemical engineering. John D. Perkins is Vice President and Dean of the Faculty of Engineering & Physical Sciences at the University of Manchester. Professor Perkins was until recently Principal of the Faculty of Engineering and Courtaulds Professor of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London. His academic career spans periods at Cambridge University and at the University of Sydney as well as Imperial College. He has industrial experience with Shell and with ICI, in the United Kingdom and in Australia, and has acted as a consultant in process control and process modeling and simulation for a number of companies around the world. He is the author of a number of authoritative reports and has managed several industrial consortia projects aimed at benchmarking and introducing advanced control methods into industrial practice. Julia M. Phillips (NAE) is the Director of the Physical, Chemical, and Nano Science Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Phillips began her career at Sandia in 1995 after 14 years at AT&T Bell Laboratories. She has a PhD in applied physics from Yale University and a BS in physics from the College of William and Mary. Her research has been in the areas of epitaxial metallic and insulating films on semiconductors, high-temperature superconducting, ferroelectric and magnetic oxide thin films, and novel transparent conducting materials. Adel F. Sarofim (NAE) is Presidential Professor in the College of Engineering, University of Utah and Senior Technical Advisor to Reaction Engineering International in Salt Lake City. Dr. Sarofim is the author and coauthor of over 200 papers on the subjects of radiative heat transfer, furnace design, circulation patterns in glass melts, the freeze process for desalination, nitric oxide formation in combustion systems, combustion-generated aerosols, soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation, and the characterization of carbon structure and reactivity. He received a BA in chemistry from Oxford University and an SM and ScD in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jackie Y. Ying was born in Taipei, and raised in Singapore and New York. She received her BE from The Cooper Union and PhD from Princeton University. She was an NSF-NATO Postdoctoral Fellow and Alexander von

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International Benchmarking of U.S. Chemical Engineering Research Competitiveness Humboldt Research Fellow at the Institute for New Materials, Germany. She joined the Chemical Engineering faculty of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992, and was promoted to the rank of Professor in 2001. She has been the Executive Director of the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore since 2003. Ying has been recognized with a number of awards for her research in nanostructured materials, including the American Ceramic Society Ross C. Purdy Award, David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation Young Investigator Awards, Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, Royal Academy of Engineering ICI Faculty Fellowship, American Chemical Society Faculty Fellowship Award in Solid-State Chemistry, Technology Review TR100 Young Innovator Award, American Institute of Chemical Engineers Allan P. Colburn Award. She was elected a World Economic Forum Global Young Leader, and a member of the German Academy of Natural Scientists, Leopoldina.