APPENDIX E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Consultants, and Staff

Nancy C. Andreasen, M.D., Ph.D., Chair, is Andrew H. Woods Chair of Psychiatry and director of the Neuroimaging Research Center at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. Dr. Andreasen’s academic and clinical research is concerned with the relationships between medical, psychological, and social factors of distress, specifically including brain imaging, schizophrenia, and genetic and family studies. She previously served as President of the American Psychopathological Association and the Psychiatric Research Society. Dr. Andreasen is a Member of the Institute of Medicine and was elected to serve on its governing council for two four-year terms. She is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Andreasen won the President’s National Medal of Science for 2000 and has also received many other awards including the Interbrew-Baillet-Latour Prize from the Belgian government, the Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat Prize from the Institute of Medicine, the Lieber Prize for Outstanding Schizophrenia Research, the Sigmund Freud Award from the American College of Psychoanalysis, and both the Kolb Award and Sachar Award from Columbia University. She has written two widely praised books for the general public, The Broken Brain: The Biological Revolution in Psychiatry (1983) and Brave New Brain: Conquering Mental Illness in the Era of the Genome (2001). More recently, she authored The Creating Brain: The Neuroscience of Genius (2005). Dr. Andreasen has also authored, co-authored, or edited 12 other scholarly books and more than 500 articles.



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PTSD Compensation and Military Service APPENDIX E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Consultants, and Staff Nancy C. Andreasen, M.D., Ph.D., Chair, is Andrew H. Woods Chair of Psychiatry and director of the Neuroimaging Research Center at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. Dr. Andreasen’s academic and clinical research is concerned with the relationships between medical, psychological, and social factors of distress, specifically including brain imaging, schizophrenia, and genetic and family studies. She previously served as President of the American Psychopathological Association and the Psychiatric Research Society. Dr. Andreasen is a Member of the Institute of Medicine and was elected to serve on its governing council for two four-year terms. She is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Andreasen won the President’s National Medal of Science for 2000 and has also received many other awards including the Interbrew-Baillet-Latour Prize from the Belgian government, the Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat Prize from the Institute of Medicine, the Lieber Prize for Outstanding Schizophrenia Research, the Sigmund Freud Award from the American College of Psychoanalysis, and both the Kolb Award and Sachar Award from Columbia University. She has written two widely praised books for the general public, The Broken Brain: The Biological Revolution in Psychiatry (1983) and Brave New Brain: Conquering Mental Illness in the Era of the Genome (2001). More recently, she authored The Creating Brain: The Neuroscience of Genius (2005). Dr. Andreasen has also authored, co-authored, or edited 12 other scholarly books and more than 500 articles.

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PTSD Compensation and Military Service Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Ph.D., R.N., is the Anna D. Wolf Chair at The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. She earned her Ph.D. in nursing from the University of Rochester. Dr. Campbell’s research addresses the risk factors for and the evaluation of interventions to prevent domestic violence, and she served on the National Institute of Mental Health Violence and Traumatic Stress Study Section. Dr. Campbell has been inducted into the American Academy of Nursing and the Institute of Medicine. She has been selected as the Simon Visiting Scholar, University of Manchester (U.K.) and, most recently, the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nursing/American Nursing Foundation Scholar in Residence. Dr. Campbell was a member of the Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence (2000–2003), a congressionally appointed civilian and military committee to make recommendations to improve the military response to intimate-partner violence. She has been active in the Institute of Medicine as a board member on the Board on Global Health and has served as a member of two committees for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Judith A. Cook, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She directs UIC’s Center on Mental Health Services Research and Policy, which conducts research projects intended to enhance the state of evidence-based practice and systems transformation in behavioral health. Her research focuses on self-determination and recovery among people with psychiatric disabilities. Dr. Cook has served as an expert consultant on employment and income supports for the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, and she authored the commission subcommittee’s report on “Employment and Income Supports for People with Mental Illness.” She contributed a paper on decisional capacity in mental illness and substance-use disorders to the 2006 Institute of Medicine report Improving the Quality of Health Care for Mental and Substance-Use Conditions: Quality Chasm Series. Dr. Cook received her Ph.D. in sociology from Ohio State University. John A. Fairbank, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of medical psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center and Co-Director of the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. He received his Ph.D. from Auburn University. His research interests include assessment, prevention, and treatment of traumatic stress reactions in children, adolescents, and adults. Dr. Fairbank is currently a member of the National Center for Injury Prevention and of the Control Initial Review Group for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 1998 he served as an advisor to an IOM study on strategies to protect the health of deployed U.S. forces. Dr. Fairbank is currently the chair of the

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PTSD Compensation and Military Service technical working group of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being for the Administration for Children, Youth, and Families. Bonnie L. Green, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of Research in the Department of Psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical School in Washington, D.C. She has studied the consequences of traumatic events, including disasters (dam collapse, fire, radioactive contamination) and war (Vietnam and World War II), for several decades, examining what predicts different types of outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Her research at Georgetown has focused on the psychological and physical health consequences of individual traumas, including breast cancer, traumatic bereavement, and interpersonal violence. Her current research focuses on the trauma-related mental health needs of poor women in primary care settings, including physical health outcomes associated with trauma exposure. She is principal investigator (PI) and Director of a developing center from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), The Georgetown Center for Trauma and the Community, the purpose of which is to develop innovative and sustainable interventions for trauma-related mental health needs of low-income populations seen in primary-care safety-net settings in the Washington, D.C., region. She is past editor of the Journal of Traumatic Stress, and past president of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. Dr. Green has served on numerous advisory, review, and oversight groups, including an IOM committee on evaluation of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Uniform Case Assessment Protocol, which addressed the health concerns of veterans. Dean G. Kilpatrick, Ph.D., is Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at the Medical University of South Carolina. Dr. Kilpatrick received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Georgia. He previously held a position at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in South Carolina as a clinical psychologist. His primary research interests include measuring the prevalence of rape, other violent crimes, and other types of potentially traumatic events as well as assessing the mental health impact of such events. He is currently President of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush presented Dr. Kilpatrick with the President’s Award for Outstanding Service for Victims of Crime, the nation’s highest award in the crime victims’ field. Kurt Kroenke, M.D., is Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics at Indiana University. He is also a Research Scientist in the Regenstrief Institute, where he is Director of fellowship

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PTSD Compensation and Military Service training. Dr. Kroenke has directed clinical research training programs since 1988, first at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and, since 1997, at Indiana University. In 2002, he was elected to Mastership in the American College of Physicians. Dr. Kroenke is a past president of the Society of General Internal Medicine and has served on the American Psychiatric Association DSM-IV Primary Care Working Group, and the National Board of Medical Examiners Step 1 Behavioral Medicine Task Force. He is a member of the NIMH Services Research Study Section, and has over 200 publications. His principal research interests include common symptoms in medical patients including pain, depression assessment and treatment, and somatization. Dr. Kroenke’s studies include a randomized trial of enhanced care for poststroke depression, primary-care-based depression interventions, improved evaluation and therapy of pain, and strategies for investigating and managing physical symptoms, symptom syndromes, and somatization. He served as a physician in the U.S. Army for 20 years, earning the rank of Colonel. Richard A. Kulka, Ph.D., is Senior Vice President of strategic business development for the research and consulting firm Abt Associates Inc. He also serves as a Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Demographic Studies at Duke University, where he is a co-PI of the National Long Term Care Survey, and recently served as Executive Vice President of the social and statistical sciences at RTI International. Dr. Kulka received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. Dr. Kulka has been involved with the design, conduct, and analysis of numerous surveys on health and other social policy issues, as well as applied research on survey research methods. He served as project leader and co-PI for the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study—a national survey of the incidence and prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and Vietnam veterans and their peers. He has served on numerous advisory, review, and oversight groups, including two expert panels for the Committee on National Statistics, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences, for which he has also served as report coordinator for several recent reports. Patricia M. Owens, M.P.A., is a consultant for public and private organization on health and disability programs. She is the past president of Integrated Health Disability Management at UNUM Life Insurance Company of America, where she designed and implemented their extensive disability research initiative. Ms. Owens is a board member of the National Academy of Social Insurance and served on their Disability Policy Panel. She is the former Associate Commissioner for disability of the U.S. Social Security Administration, where she oversaw the overhaul of the mental listings and

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PTSD Compensation and Military Service the incorporation of pain symptoms in disability determinations. Ms. Owens recently served as a panel member for a symposium for the Disability Research Institute and an IOM workshop on improving the disability decision process. Robert T. Reville, Ph.D., is the director of the RAND Institute of Civil Justice, in Santa Monica, California, and previously served as its research director. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from Brown University. Dr. Reville is a labor economist who focuses on compensation policy and more specifically on workplace injury compensation policy and the impact of disability on employment. He is on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Reville is a founding co-director of the Center for Terrorism Risk Management Policy, which addresses compensation, liability, risk management, risk modeling, and insurance. He is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, serving on the Workers’ Compensation Steering Committee. David S. Salkever, Ph.D., is Professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County. He is also Research Associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research. Dr. Salkever previously was on the faculty of The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health where he served as the director of the school’s Interdepartmental Program in Public Health Economics and as Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, the Department of Economics, and the Department of Mental Health. Dr. Salkever received his Ph.D. in economics at Harvard University. His past research includes topics related to health policy including labor market impacts for severe mental disorders, the costs and effectiveness of trauma center services, and determinants and regulation of hospital cost inflation. Currently he serves on the Interventions Review Committee of the NIMH. He previously served on the Data Monitoring Board of the Department of a Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study entitled “The Clinical and Economic Impact of Olanzapine in the Treatment of Schizophrenia.” In 2003 Dr. Salkever was recognized with the Adam Smith Award for Mental Health Economics Research. Robert J. Ursano, M.D., is Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. He is also director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. Dr. Ursano received his M.D. from Yale University. He has served as the Department of Defense representative to the National Advisory Mental Health Council of the NIMH and is a past member of the NIMH Rapid Trauma and Disaster Grant Review

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PTSD Compensation and Military Service Section. Dr. Ursano is the editor of the journal Psychiatry. He has received the Department of Defense Humanitarian Service Award and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Traumatic Stress Society. Dr. Ursano is widely published in the field of PTSD and the psychological effects of terrorism, bioterrorism, and traumatic events and disasters, and combat. He has been a member of many national advisory boards related to mental health including the IOM Committee on Psychological Responses to Terrorism. He was a physician in the U.S. Air Force, retiring after 20 years service with the rank of Colonel. Consultants Robert J. Epley is an independent consultant working in the areas of strategic planning, training, performance management, and the operations of federal entitlement programs. Mr. Epley served with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for 31 years, dividing his tenure between positions in headquarters and in the field. In VA field offices, he progressed through positions as benefits counselor and claims examiner to director of two regional offices in Detroit and St. Louis. At VA headquarters, Mr. Epley was Chief of Field Operations for the education program, and later he served as Deputy Director and Director of the Compensation & Pension Service. His final position with VA was Associate Deputy Under Secretary for Policy and Program Management, where he was responsible for administration and oversight of the Veterans Benefits Administration’s business lines: compensation, pension, housing, insurance, vocational rehabilitation, and education. During his tenure with VA, Mr. Epley received two Vice President Al Gore Hammer Awards for reinventing government, and two Presidential Rank Awards. Carol S. North, M.D., M.P.E., is Professor of Psychiatry and the Nancy and Ray L. Hunt Professor of Crisis Psychiatry at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Dr. North is also Director of the Program in Trauma and Disaster at the VA North Texas Health Care System in Dallas. She holds a joint appointment in emergency medicine in the Division of Homeland Security. Listed in The Best Doctors in America, Dr. North is also recognized as a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and Fellow of the American Psychopathological Association, serves on the board of directors of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists, and is past president of the Eastern Missouri Psychiatric Society. Dr. North investigates the role of psychiatric illness in the presentation of gastrointestinal disease, the psychiatric effects of disasters and terrorism, and the interface of psychiatric and medical disease. She has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific published articles, has served on editorial boards for scientific

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PTSD Compensation and Military Service journals, and chaired or served on committees for federal grant review and development of terrorism policy for the Institute of Medicine. Alfred V. Rascon, Reserve Major, is an officer in the Medical Service Corps of the U.S. Army. From 2001 to 2003, he served as the 10th Director of the Selective Service System, where he was directly responsible to the President for the management of that agency. Prior to his appointment as Director, Major Rascon had served for five years as Selective Service’s Inspector General. His career as a federal employee spans over 40 years, with assignments in the Army and within the Department of Justice, where he served with the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and INTERPOL (International Criminal Police Organization). On February 8, 2000, Major Rascon received the Congressional Medal of Honor from President Clinton. He was recognized with the nation’s highest combat decoration for extraordinarily courageous acts in Vietnam, where he served as a combat medic. Institute of Medicine Staff David A. Butler, Ph.D., is Senior Program Officer in the IOM Board on Military and Veterans Health. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering from the University of Rochester and his Ph.D. degree in public policy analysis from Carnegie-Mellon University. Before joining the IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment and was Research Associate in the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He has directed several IOM studies on health and risk-assessment topics, resulting in the reports Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 1998, and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2000; and the report series Characterizing the Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam; Disposition of the Air Force Health Study; Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures; and Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Amy O’Connor, M.P.H. is Research Associate in the IOM Board on Military and Veterans Health. She received her M.P.H. in environmental and occupational health from the George Washington University where she was the recipient of the Ruhland Fellowship for outstanding applicant. She received her undergraduate degree in chemistry from George Mason University. She is also an Army veteran of the first Gulf War era, during which time she served as combat photographer. She served as Research Associate for the IOM report Disposition of the Air Force Health Study. Jon Q. Sanders, B.A., is Program Associate with the Board on Military

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PTSD Compensation and Military Service and Veterans Health. Since joining the National Academies in 2001, Mr. Sanders has worked on more than a dozen studies ranging from Everglades restoration to childhood obesity. Mr. Sanders received his B.A. degree in anthropology from Trinity University, and he is currently pursuing graduate work in public health. In 2006 Mr. Sanders was recognized by the Institute of Medicine for his five years of distinguished service. He is a member of the Society for Applied Anthropology and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. He is coauthor of Sitting Down at the Table: Mediation and Resolution of Water Conflicts (2001). Mr. Sanders’ research interests include veteran health issues and environmental decision making. Eileen Santa, M.A., has been Research Associate at the IOM for two years. She earned her Masters degree in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts, where she is currently a doctoral candidate. Her research focuses on the cultural factors that contribute to healthy outcomes for Latina mothers and children. Frederick (Rick) Erdtmann, M.D., M.P.H., is Director of the Board on Military and Veterans Health and Director of the Medical Follow-up Agency of the IOM at the National Academies. He attended medical school in Philadelphia where he earned his M.D. degree from Temple University School of Medicine, and he holds an M.P.H. from the University of California at Berkeley. He completed a residency program in general preventive medicine at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in 1975 and is board certified in that specialty. Dr. Erdtmann’s assignments with the Army Medical Department included chief of the preventive medicine services at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, at Frankfurt Army Medical Center in Germany, and at Madigan Army Medical Center. He also served as division surgeon for the Second Infantry Division in Tongduchon, Korea. He later served as deputy chief of staff for clinical operations within DOD’s TRICARE Region 1, prior to assuming hospital command at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in March 1998. Following that he was assigned to the Office of the Surgeon General as the Deputy Assistant Surgeon General for Force Development. In 2001, following 30 years of commissioned military service, Dr. Erdtmann joined the National Academies and assumed his present responsibilities. Christine R. Hartel, Ph.D., is the Director of the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences at the National Research Council, where she has also directed studies on Social Security benefits, behavioral research for the military, and social psychology and aging. Previously, she served as associate executive director for science at the American Psychological Association and as deputy director for basic research at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She was also a consultant to the World Health Organization

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PTSD Compensation and Military Service on the effects of marijuana. Dr. Hartel served as a research psychologist at the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, where she earned the Army’s highest civilian award for technical excellence. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and a member of the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Neuroscience, and the Gerontological Society of America. Her Ph.D. degree is in biopsychology from the University of Chicago.

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