Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Participants

Peter B. Bach, M.D., M.A.P.P., joined the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as a senior adviser to the administrator in February 2005. Dr. Bach’s work at CMS focuses on improving evidence about the effect of therapies and devices, and revising payment to enhance care quality. He also is the agency lead on cancer policy. Dr. Bach is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine, and critical care medicine and is an associate attending physician at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He is a National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded researcher with expertise in quality of care and epidemiologic research methods. His research on health disparities, variations in healthcare quality, and lung cancer epidemiology has appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. During the Rwandan Civil War, he was a camp physician in Goma, Zaire, caring for refugees. Dr. Bach received his bachelor’s degree in English and American literature from Harvard College, his M.D. from the University of Minnesota, and his master of arts degree in public policy from the University of Chicago, where he was also a Robert Wood Johnson clinical scholar. He completed his clinical training in internal medicine and pulmonary and critical care at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.


Andrew Barbash, M.D., is the chief executive officer (CEO) of Apractis Solutions, LLC, Collaboration Partners. He is also a practicing neurologist and the medical director of the Holy Cross Hospital Stroke Care Program in Maryland. He was a vice president and member of the senior management of the Medical Group for Kaiser Permanente of the Mid-Atlantic



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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Participants Peter B. Bach, M.D., M.A.P.P., joined the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as a senior adviser to the administrator in February 2005. Dr. Bach’s work at CMS focuses on improving evidence about the effect of therapies and devices, and revising payment to enhance care quality. He also is the agency lead on cancer policy. Dr. Bach is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine, and critical care medicine and is an associate attending physician at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He is a National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded researcher with expertise in quality of care and epidemiologic research methods. His research on health disparities, variations in healthcare quality, and lung cancer epidemiology has appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. During the Rwandan Civil War, he was a camp physician in Goma, Zaire, caring for refugees. Dr. Bach received his bachelor’s degree in English and American literature from Harvard College, his M.D. from the University of Minnesota, and his master of arts degree in public policy from the University of Chicago, where he was also a Robert Wood Johnson clinical scholar. He completed his clinical training in internal medicine and pulmonary and critical care at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Andrew Barbash, M.D., is the chief executive officer (CEO) of Apractis Solutions, LLC, Collaboration Partners. He is also a practicing neurologist and the medical director of the Holy Cross Hospital Stroke Care Program in Maryland. He was a vice president and member of the senior management of the Medical Group for Kaiser Permanente of the Mid-Atlantic

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary states until 2001, where he managed the development and deployment of the electronic medical record for that region. He has been very active in the e-health, mobile health, and personal health records arena and has served on national-level workgroups related to consumer information empowerment and e-health. He was a member of the Task Force on Information Capture in 2001 and is also leading the Personal Medication Records project in the SOS Rx initiative, sponsored by the National Consumers League. In 2003-2004 he was actively engaged with the Medical Records Institute relative to mobile computing and the TEPR (Towards the Electronic Patient Record) awards. He is also very active in Health Tech Net, a Washington area consortium of health technology participants. He completed his B.A. at Bowdoin College, his M.D. at Northwestern University, and his neurology residency at the Mayo Clinic. Marc L. Berger, M.D., is vice president for Outcomes Research and Management in the U.S. Human Health Division at Merck & Co., Inc While at Merck, Dr. Berger has held various positions of responsibility for Phase II to Phase IV clinical trials, outcomes research studies, and disease management programs. His current research interests include health-related productivity, cost-effectiveness analysis, and the value of pharmaceutical innovation. He was recently invited to serve on the CMS Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee. He also serves on advisory boards for the Health Industry Forum and the Program on the Economic Evaluation of Medical Technology (PEEMT) at the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, as well as for the journal Value in Health. He holds appointments as adjunct senior fellow at the Leonard David Institute of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania and adjunct professor in the Department of Health Policy and Administration at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health. Prior to joining Merck, he was on the faculty of the University of Cincinnati School of Medicine. Dr. Berger obtained his M.D. from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed an internal medicine residency at New York University-Bellevue Hospital and a Liver Research Fellowship at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. Robert M. Califf, M.D., is vice chancellor for clinical research, director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI), and professor of medicine in the division of cardiology at Duke University Medical Center. He is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology and is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology. Author or coauthor of more than 600 peer-reviewed journal articles, as well as major textbooks on cardiovascular disease, Dr. Califf has also served on the Cardiorenal Advisory Panel of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Pharmaceutical Roundtable

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He is director of the coordinating center for the Centers for Education and Research on Therapeutics (CERTs), a public-private partnership among the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the DCRI, academia, the medical products industry, and consumer groups focused on research and education that strives to advance the best use of medical products. Dr. Califf graduated from Duke University in 1973 summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa and from Duke University Medical School in 1978, where he was selected for Alpha Omega Alpha. He completed his internship and residency at the University of California at San Francisco and his fellowship in cardiology at Duke University. Carolyn M. Clancy, M.D., is director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Prior to 2002 she was director of AHRQ’s Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research (COER). Her major research interests include various dimensions of healthcare quality and patients’, including women’s health, primary care, access to care services, and the impact of financial incentives on physicians’ decisions. Prior to joining AHRQ in 1990, she was an assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. Dr. Clancy holds an academic appointment at George Washington University School of Medicine (clinical associate professor, Department of Medicine), is the senior associate editor of Health Services Research, and serves on multiple editorial boards. Dr. Clancy has published widely in peer-reviewed journals and has edited or contributed to seven books. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was elected a master of the American College of Physicians in 2004. Dr. Clancy, a general internist and health services researcher, is a graduate of Boston College and the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Following clinical training in internal medicine, Dr. Clancy was a Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Denis A. Cortese, M.D., is president and CEO at Mayo Clinic and chair of the Executive Committee. He is a member of the Board of Trustees and is a professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. He is a director and former president of the International Photodynamic Association and has been involved in the bronchoscopic detection, localization, and treatment of early-stage lung cancer. He is a member of the Healthcare Leadership Council and the Harvard-Kennedy School Healthcare Policy Group, and a former member of the Center for Corporate Innovation. He also is a charter member of the Advisory Board of World Community Grid and a founding member of the American Medical Group Association Chairs-Presidents-CEOs Council. Following service in the U.S. Naval Corps, he joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, as a specialist

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary in pulmonary medicine. He was a member of the Board of Governors in Rochester before moving to Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. He has served as chair of the Board of Governors at Mayo Clinic and chair of the Board of Directors at St. Luke’s Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. He also served on the Steering Committee for the RAND Ix Project, “Using Information Technology to Create a New Future in Healthcare,” and the Principals Committee of the National Innovation Initiative. Dr. Cortese is a graduate of Temple University and completed his residency at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. Dr. Cortese is a member of the IOM, a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in England, and an honorary member of the Academia Nacional de Mexicana (Mexico). Helen Darling is president of the National Business Group on Health (formerly Washington Business Group on Health). Ms. Darling also currently serves as co-chair of the Committee on Performance Measurement of the National Committee for Quality Assurance. She is a member of the Medical Advisory Panel, Technology Evaluation Center, run by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association; the IOM Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; the Cancer Care Measures Steering Committee of the National Quality Forum; the Board of the VHA (Veterans Health Administration) Health Foundation, along with a number of other advisory and editorial boards. From 1992 through 1998, Ms. Darling directed the purchasing of health benefits and disability for Xerox Corporation and was previously a principal at William W. Mercer. Earlier in her career, Ms. Darling was an adviser to Senator David Durenberger, the ranking Republican on the Health Subcommittee of the Senate Finance Committee. Ms. Darling received a master’s degree in demography-sociology and a bachelor of science degree in history-English, cum laude, from the University of Memphis. David M. Eddy, M.D., Ph.D., is the director of Archimedes and is responsible for the medical development of the model. David started his career as a professor of engineering and medicine at Stanford, and the J. Alexander McMahon Professor of Health Policy and Management at Duke University. David received his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Ph.D. in engineering-economic systems (applied mathematics) from Stanford. More than 25 years ago, David wrote the seminal paper on the role of guidelines in medical decision making, the first Markov model applied to clinical problems, and the original criteria for coverage decisions; he was the first to use and publish the term evidence-based. David is the author of five books, more than 100 first-authored articles, and a series of essays for the Journal of the American Medical Association. His writings range from technical mathematical theories to broad health policy topics. David has received top national and international awards in fields including applied math-

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary ematics, health technology assessment, healthcare quality, and outcomes research. He has been elected or appointed to more than 40 national and international boards and commissions, including Consumers Union, the National Board of Mathematics, the World Health Organization Panel of Experts, the Blue Cross Blue Shield Medical Advisory Panel, and the National Committee for Quality Assurance, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Lynn Etheredge is an independent consultant working on health care and social policy issues. His career started at the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB). During the Nixon and Ford administrations, he was OMB’s principal analyst for Medicare and Medicaid and led its staff work on national health insurance proposals. He returned to OMB as a senior career executive and headed its professional health staff in the Carter and Reagan administrations. He was a coauthor of the Jackson Hole Group’s proposals for healthcare reform and a founding member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. During the last several years, Lynn has authored policy studies about Medicaid’s future, Medicare reforms, evidence-based health care, and expanding health insurance coverage. His current projects include a “Medicaid + tax credits” model for expanding coverage and a national rapid learning system for evidence-based health care. He is author of more than 70 publications and is a graduate of Swarthmore College. Harvey Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D., is president of the Institute of Medicine. He served as provost of Harvard University from 1997 to 2001, following 13 years as dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. He has devoted most of his academic career to the fields of health policy and medical decision making. His past research has focused on the process of policy development and implementation, assessment of medical technology, evaluation and use of vaccines, and dissemination of medical innovations. Dr. Fineberg helped found and served as president of the Society for Medical Decision Making and also served as consultant to the World Health Organization. At IOM he has chaired and served on a number of panels dealing with health policy issues, ranging from AIDS to new medical technology. He also served as a member of the Public Health Council of Massachusetts (1976-1979), chairman of the Health Care Technology Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research (1982-1985), and president of the Association of Schools of Public Health (1995-1996). Dr. Fineberg is coauthor of the books Clinical Decision Analysis, Innovators in Physician Education, and The Epidemic That Never Was, an analysis of the controversial federal immunization program against swine flu in 1976. He has coedited several books on such diverse topics as AIDS prevention, vaccine safety, and under-

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary standing risk in society. He has also authored numerous articles published in professional journals. In 1988, he received the Joseph W. Mountain Prize from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Wade Hampton Frost Prize from the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association (APHA). Dr. Fineberg earned his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees from Harvard University. Robert Galvin, M.D., is director of global health care for General Electric (GE). He oversees the design and performance of GE’s health programs, which total more than $3 billion annually, and is responsible for GE’s medical services, encompassing over 220 medical clinics in more than 20 countries. In his current role, he focuses on issues of market-based health policy and financing, with a special interest in quality measurement and improvement. He has been a leader in pushing for public release of performance information and reform of the payment system. He was a member of the Strategic Framework Board of the National Quality Forum and is on the board of NCQA. He is a founder of both the Leapfrog Group and Bridges to Excellence. He is also a member of the Advisory Board of the Council of Health Care Economics and the IOM Committee on Redesigning Health Insurance Benefits, Payments and Performance Improvement Programs. Adjunct professor of medicine and health policy at Yale, he is also a fellow of the American College of Physicians and has published in various journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine and Health Affairs. Dr. Galvin completed his undergraduate work at the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa. He received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha. He received an M.B.A. in healthcare management from Boston University School of Management. Janlori Goldman, J.D., is director of the Health Privacy Project and research faculty at the Center on Medicine as a Profession at Columbia University. She specializes in privacy and confidentiality issues within the physician-patient relationship, and her areas of expertise include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) privacy regulation, public health and bioterrorism, and e-health initiatives. She also directs the Health Privacy Project, based in Washington, D.C., which she founded after a year as a visiting scholar at Georgetown University Law Center. Ms. Goldman co-founded the Center for Democracy and Technology, a nonprofit civil liberties organization committed to preserving free speech and privacy on the Internet. She was the staff attorney and director of the Privacy and Technology Project of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Her efforts at the ACLU led to the enactment of the Video Privacy Protection Act, and she also led initiatives to protect people’s health, credit, financial,

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary and personal information held by the government. Her publications include “Bioterrorism, Public Health and Privacy,” included in the publication Lost Liberties: Ashcroft and the Assault on Personal Freedom; two articles in Health Affairs: “Virtually Exposed: Privacy and E-Health,” coauthored with Zoe Hudson, and “Protecting Privacy to Improve Health Care”; and “A Federal Right of Information Privacy,” coauthored with Jerry Berman and included as a chapter in Computers, Ethics, and Social Values. David Goldstein, Ph.D., is visiting professor of molecular genetics and microbiology and has been director of the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy (IGSP) Center for Population Genomics and Pharmacogenetics since June 2005. Dr. Goldstein’s principal interests include human genetic diversity, the genetics of neurological disease, and pharmacogenetics. He is the author of more than 75 scholarly publications in the areas of population and medical genetics. He is on the editorial boards of Current Biology, Annals of Human Genetics, Molecular Biology and Evolution, and Human Genomics. He is the recipient of one of the first seven nationally awarded Royal Society-Wolfson Research Merit Awards in the United Kingdom for his work in human population genetics. Dr. Goldstein received his Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University in 1994, and from 1999 to 2005 was Wolfson Professor of Genetics at University College London. Sheldon Greenfield, M.D., is director of the Center for Health Policy Research and professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of California (UCLA), Irvine College of Medicine. Previously, Dr. Greenfield was director of the Primary Care Outcomes Research Institute at New England Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Greenfield was associated with the UCLA Schools of Medicine and Public Health and the Rand Corporation in California, including the position of co-director of the Joint RAND-UCLA Center for Health Policy Study. He has pioneered research in increasing patients’ participation in care and using outcomes to determine the value of that participation. Beginning in 1984, Dr. Greenfield served as the medical director of the Medical Outcomes Study, which sought to compare systems of care, specialties, various aspects of interpersonal care, and resource use to outcome. Dr. Greenfield was principal investigator (PI) of the Type 2 Diabetes Patient Outcome Research Team, and is chairman of the Diabetes Quality Improvement Program, a joint venture of the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), NCQA, and the American Diabetes Association (ADA). He is currently serving as chair of the National Diabetes Quality Alliance. He is also former president of the Society of General Internal Medicine and was chairman of the Health Care Technology Study Section for the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now AHRQ). Dr. Greenfield earned an A.B. from Harvard College and an

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary M.D. from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He completed his residency and a fellowship in infectious disease at Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Telba Irony, Ph.D., is chief of the General and Surgical Devices Branch in the Division of Biostatistics at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) of the FDA. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1990 where she worked with applications of Bayesian Statistics. She was on the faculty of the George Washington University, Engineering School, from 1990 to 1998, when she joined the CDRH in order to help implement the use of Bayesian methodology in medical device clinical trials. She worked in several projects of applications of Bayesian statistics sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and produced more than 30 articles that were published in statistical journals. George Isham, M.D., M.S., is medical director and chief health officer for HealthPartners. He is responsible for quality, utilization management, health promotion and disease prevention, research, and health professionals’ education at HealthPartners, a consumer-governed Minnesota health plan representing nearly 800,000 members. Before his current position, Dr. Isham was medical director of MedCenters Health Plan in Minneapolis. In the late 1980s, he was executive director of University Health Care, an organization affiliated with the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Isham received his master of science in preventive medicine and administrative medicine at the University of Wisconsin, Madison; he received his M.D. from the University of Illinois; and he completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in Madison. His practice experience as a primary care physician included eight years at the Freeport Clinic in Freeport, Illinois, and three and one-half years as clinical assistant professor in medicine at the University of Wisconsin. Brent C. James, M.D., M.Stat., is executive director of the Institute for Health Care Delivery Research and vice president of Medical Research and Continuing Medical Education at Intermountain Healthcare. Based in Salt Lake City, Utah, Intermountain Healthcare is an integrated system of 23 hospitals, almost 100 clinics, a 450+ member physician group, and an HMO-PPO (health maintenance organization-preferred provider organization) insurance plan jointly responsible for more than 450,000 covered lives. Brent James is known internationally for his work in clinical quality improvement, patient safety, and the infrastructure that underlies successful improvement efforts, such as culture change, data systems, payment methods, and management roles. Before coming to Intermountain, he was an assistant professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary School of Public Health, providing statistical support for the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, and staffed the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer. He holds faculty appointments at the University of Utah School of Medicine, Harvard School of Public Health, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and University of Sydney, Australia, School of Public Health. He is also a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.. Dr. James holds bachelor of science degrees in computer science (electrical engineering) and medical biology, an M.D., and a master of statistics degree from the University of Utah; he completed residency training in general surgery and oncology. Stephen I. Katz, M.D., Ph.D., has been director of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMSD) since August 1995 and is also a senior investigator in the Dermatology Branch of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Dr. Katz has focused his studies on immunology and the skin. His research has demonstrated that skin is an important component of the immune system both in its normal function and as a target in immunologically mediated disease. In addition to studying Langerhans cells and epidermally derived cytokines, Dr. Katz and his colleagues have added considerable new knowledge about inherited and acquired blistering skin diseases. He also has served many professional societies, including as a member of the Board of Directors and president of the Society for Investigative Dermatology, on the Board of the Association of Professors of Dermatology, as secretary-general of the 18th World Congress of Dermatology in New York in 1992, as secretary-treasurer of the Clinical Immunology Society, and as president of both the International League of Dermatological Societies and the International Committee of Dermatology. Dr. Katz has twice received the Meritorious Rank Award and has also received the Distinguished Executive Presidential Rank Award, the highest honor that can be bestowed upon a civil servant. He earned a B.A. in history from the University of Maryland, an M.D. from Tulane University Medical School, and a Ph.D. in immunology from the University of London, England. He completed a medical internship at Los Angeles County Hospital and a residency in dermatology at the University of Miami School of Medicine, Florida. Darrell G. Kirch, M.D., is president and chief executive officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), a position he assumed on July 1, 2006. Dr. Kirch’s career spans all aspects of academic medicine and includes leadership positions at two medical schools and teaching hospitals, as well as at the National Institutes of Health. Before becoming the AAMC’s fourth president, Dr. Kirch was selected to be chair-elect of the association, and served as co-chair of the Liaison Committee on Medical

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Education and as a member-at-large of the National Board of Medical Examiners. He also has served as chair of the AAMC’s Council of Deans Administrative Board and as chair of the American Medical Association (AMA) Section on Medical Schools. Dr. Kirch comes to the AAMC after six years as senior vice president for health affairs, dean of the College of Medicine, and CEO of the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center at the Pennsylvania State University, where he and his leadership team are credited with revitalizing the institution and guiding it through a period of major expansion. Dr. Kirch held a number of leadership positions at the Medical College of Georgia, including dean of the medical school, senior vice president for clinical activities, and dean of the School of Graduate Studies. As a psychiatrist and clinical neuroscientist, Dr. Kirch is a leading expert on the biological basis of and treatments for severe neuropsychiatric disorders. Following the completion of his residency training at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, he joined the National Institute of Mental Health, in Bethesda, Maryland, where he was named acting scientific director in 1993. Dr. Kirch is an active member of several professional societies, including the American College of Psychiatrists, the AMA, and the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Kirch received both his B.A. and his M.D. from the University of Colorado. Joel Kupersmith, M.D., is chief research and development officer of the Veterans Health Administration. He has completed projects and published papers on a number of health and research policy areas including how to fund, oversee, and promote effectiveness research; how academic medical centers should be accountable; quality of care in teaching hospitals; regional institutional review boards (IRBs); medical manpower; and other issues. Following his early research on cardiac rhythm abnormalities and implantable cardiac defibrillators, he published in the area of cost-effectiveness of heart disease treatments and outcomes following heart attacks. He is widely published, with at least 150 publications and two books, and has been on the editorial boards of numerous journals, including the American Journal of Medicine. Prior to joining the VHA, Dr. Kupersmith held faculty positions at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, University of Louisville, and the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University. He served as dean of the School of Medicine and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and vice president for clinical affairs at Texas Tech University. He was a scholar-in-residence at both the IOM and the AAMC and a visiting scholar at the Hastings Center for Ethics and is a member of numerous professional organizations. Dr. Kupersmith is a winner of an Affirmative Action Award from the University of Louisville and an Alumni Association distinguished achievement award from New York Medical College. Dr. Kupersmith was elected to the Governing Council, Medical School Section of the AMA, is a

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary member of the AAMC Task Force on Fraud and Abuse, and has been a site visit chair for the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. Dr. Kupersmith earned his M.D. from New York Medical College, where he also completed residency in internal medicine, and completed a cardiology fellowship at Beth Israel Medical Center-Harvard Medical School. Eric B. Larson, M.D., M.P.H., M.A.C.P., is director of Group Health Cooperative’s Center for Health Studies. His research spans a range of general medicine topics and has focused on aging and dementia topics, including a long running study of aging and cognitive change set in Group Health Cooperative: the UW-Group Health Alzheimer’s Disease Patient Registry-Adult Changes in Thought Study. He has served as president of the Society of General Internal Medicine, chair of the Office of Technology Assessment-Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Advisory Panel on Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders and was chair of the Board of Regents (2004-2005), American College of Physicians. He is currently PI on an NIH Roadmap project to expand existing clinical research networks: The Coordinated Clinical Studies Network of the HMO Research Network (HMORN). He also served as medical director of University of Washington Medical Center and associate dean for clinical affairs from l989 to 2002. A graduate of Harvard Medical School, he trained in internal medicine at Beth Israel Hospital, completed a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars and M.P.H. program at the University of Washington, and then served as chief resident of University Hospital in Seattle. Cato T. Laurencin, M.D., Ph.D., is the Lillian T. Pratt Professor and Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery, university professor, and professor of biomedical engineering and chemical engineering at the University of Virginia and an IOM member. The focus of Dr. Laurencin’s research is novel methods for bone and musculoskeletal tissue engineering and polymeric systems for drug delivery. Prior to his appointment at Virginia University’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, he was at Drexel University as the Helen I. Moorehead Professor of Chemical Engineering, and clinical associate professor of orthopaedic surgery at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann University School of Medicine, working with the team physicians for the New York Mets and St. John’s University. Dr. Laurencin earned his B.S.E. in chemical engineering from Princeton University and went on to a Ph.D. in biochemical engineering-biotechnology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In parallel with his research training, Dr. Laurencin attended the Harvard Medical School, graduating magna cum laude. While directing his laboratory at MIT, Dr. Laurencin undertook clinical residency training in orthopaedic surgery at Harvard and served as chief resident in orthopaedic surgery at Beth Israel Hospital,

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary American Academy of Nursing. Dr. Mundinger currently sits on the board of directors of UnitedHealth Group, Gentiva Health Services, Welch Allyn, Inc., and Cell Therapeutics, Inc. Michael A. Mustille, M.D., an occupational medicine physician and physician executive for 33 years with the Permanente Medical Group in Northern California, is currently associate executive director for external relations with the Permanente Federation, a national organization of physicians who practice in the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Dr. Mustille is also a senior adviser to the Council of Accountable Physician Practices (CAPP), a joint undertaking by 34 member groups of the nation’s largest and most prominent physician practices. CAPP’s mission is to foster the development of the accountable physician group model as a step toward the transformation of the American healthcare system. Before assuming his current role in 1997, Dr. Mustille served as assistant physician-in-chief of the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in South San Francisco, California. He started with Kaiser Permanente at the Walnut Creek, California, Medical Center in 1973 as a staff physician, then moved to South San Francisco as assistant chief of medicine, and was later chief of occupational medicine at the South San Francisco and San Francisco facilities. While there, he developed a prototype occupational medicine specialty clinic that was adopted as the model for Kaiser Permanente medical centers throughout the state. Dr. Mustille received his undergraduate degree from Williams College in Massachusetts and his M.D. from Cornell University in New York. He completed a medical internship at the University of California’s Moffitt Hospital in San Francisco as well as a residency in occupational medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Omega Alpha honor societies. Nancy H. Nielsen, M.D., Ph.D., an internist from Buffalo, New York., was elected speaker of the American Medical Association House of Delegates in June 2003 and reelected in 2005. She is a delegate from New York and previously served two terms on the AMA Council on Scientific Affairs. She is clinical professor of medicine and senior associate dean for medical education at the State University of New York (SUNY) School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in Buffalo. Dr. Nielsen has also served as a member on the National Patient Safety Foundation Board of Directors, the Commission for the Prevention of Youth Violence, the Task Force on Quality and Patient Safety, and the HHS Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Regulatory Reform and as the AMA representative to the National Quality Forum, Physicians Consortium for Performance Improvement, the Hospital Quality Alliance (HQA), and the Ambulatory Care Quality Alliance (AQA). She has served as a trustee of SUNY and as a member of

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary the Board of Directors of Kaleida Health—a five-hospital system in western New York. She is currently associate medical director for quality and interim chief medical officer at Independent Health Association, a major health insurer in New York. Dr. Nielsen holds a doctorate in microbiology and received her M.D. from SUNY School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in Buffalo. Margaret E. O’Kane is the president and founder of the National Committee for Quality Assurance, an independent, nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve healthcare quality. Under Ms. O’Kane’s leadership, NCQA has developed broad support among the employer and health plan communities; most Fortune 500 companies will only do business with NCQA-accredited health plans and nearly all use HEDIS data to evaluate the plans that serve their employees. Ms. O’Kane was named Health Person of the Year in 1996 by Medicine & Health; in 1997 she received a Founder’s Award from the American College of Medical Quality, and she is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine. In 2000, Ms. O’Kane received the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Champion of Prevention Award, the agency’s highest honor. In 2005, Ms. O’Kane was named one of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Health Care, and she has previously been voted one of the nation’s “100 Most Powerful People in Health Care.” Under her leadership, in 2005 NCQA received awards from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Pharmacists’ Association. Ms. O’Kane is a sought-after public speaker, regularly addressing audiences across the country on topics such as pay-for-performance, the value of accountability, and the need to expand measurement in health care. She grants about 75 media interviews a year; has been a guest on the Today show, CNN, NBC, ABC, and NPR; and is regularly quoted in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and other major daily papers. Steve E. Phurrough, M.D., M.P.A., is the director of the Coverage and Analysis Group at the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Using evidence-based medicine principles, Dr. Phurrough assists in developing national policy on the appropriate devices, diagnostics, and procedures that should be provided by the Medicare program. Dr. Phurrough joined CMS in 2001 as the director of the Division of Medical and Surgical Services in the Coverage and Analysis Group after completing a long and distinguished career in the United States Army. In addition to being a practicing family practitioner, his military career also included managing Department of Defense regional healthcare delivery systems, creating national and international healthcare policy for the Army, and developing practice guidelines. Dr. Phurrough received his M.D. from the University of Alabama in

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Birmingham and a master’s in public administration from the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs. He is board certified by the American Board of Family Practice and is a certified physician executive by the American College of Physician Executives. Cynthia Palmer, M.Sc., is the program officer for AHRQ’s Integrated Delivery System Research Network (IDSRN) and its successor program, Accelerating Change and Transformation in Organizations and Networks (ACTION). ACTION includes 15 partners and approximately 150 collaborating organizations that link the nation’s top researchers with some of the largest healthcare systems to conduct rapid cycle, demand-driven, applied research on issues important to healthcare delivery systems. Ms. Palmer is also the co-lead of the AHRQ team involved in a National Health Plan Collaborative to reduce racial and ethnic disparities. She has more than 20 years of experience in health services research and clinical epidemiology. She joined AHRQ in December 2001 from MEDTAP International, Inc., Bethesda, Maryland, where she served as a research scientist and deputy director of the Health Economics Group. Steven D. Pearson, M.D., M.Sc., F.R.C.P., is a general internist and associate professor of ambulatory care and prevention at Harvard Medical School, and senior fellow at America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP). Dr. Pearson’s work examines the scientific and ethical foundations of evidence-based policy making in health care, and at AHIP, he performs research and policy analysis on issues related to evidence-based medicine. In addition, he is working to support the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER). ICER is a new initiative, created to integrate appraisals of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of medical innovations, with the goal of providing new information to decision makers intent on improving the value of healthcare services His published work includes the book No Margin, No Mission: Health Care Organizations and the Quest for Ethical Excellence. Dr. Pearson serves on the management committee of the International Society for Priority Setting in Health Care, and in 2004 he was awarded an Atlantic Fellowship to pursue policy studies at the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in London, England. He returned to the United States to serve from 2005 to 2006 as special adviser, Technology and Coverage Policy, at the CMS. Dr. Pearson received his B.A. from Stanford University and his M.D. from the University of California at San Francisco. He was a medical intern and resident at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, following which he completed a fellowship in health services research and received a master of science in health policy and management from the Harvard School of Public Health.

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Jonathan B. Perlin, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.H.A., F.A.C.P., is under secretary for health in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). As the chief executive officer of the Veterans Health Administration, Dr. Perlin leads the nation’s largest integrated health system. As VHA’s chief quality and performance officer from 1999 to 2002, he was responsible for supporting quality improvement and performance management. He is also commissioner to the American Health Information Community (chartered to help realize the president’s goal of making electronic health records available to most Americans within 10 years), president of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, and government liaison member to the Board of Directors of the National Quality Forum. Prior to joining VHA, Dr. Perlin served as medical director for quality improvement at the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals—Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Health System—where he is adjunct associate professor of medicine and professor of health administration at Virginia Commonwealth University. A fellow of the American College of Physicians, Dr. Perlin has a master of science in health administration. He received his Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology and an M.D. as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Medical College of Virginia campus. Robert L. Phillips, Jr., M.D., M.S.P.H., is a family physician and director of the Robert Graham Center: Policy Studies in Family Practice and Primary Care, a research center sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians. His research interests include primary care safety and quality, healthcare geography, and collaborative care processes. He has been a co-investigator on several studies of errors reported in primary care settings and contributed to a resulting taxonomy. He has faculty appointments at Georgetown University and George Washington University, and he sees patients in Fairfax, Virginia. Dr. Phillips graduated from the University of Florida College of Medicine in Gainesville, Florida, and did residency training in family medicine at the University of Missouri-Columbia in Columbia, Missouri. He remained in Columbia for a two-year National Research Service Award (NRSA) research fellowship, during which he completed a master of science in public health and did clinical practice in a community health center in a federal housing authority. He has served on the AMA’s Council on Medical Education and as the president of the National Residency Matching Program. Alan B. Rosenberg, M.D., is the vice president of Medical Policy, Technology Assessment, and Credentialing Programs for WellPoint, Inc., and president of Anthem Utilization Management Services Inc. Among his responsibilities, Dr. Rosenberg leads WellPoint’s programs (across all of its affiliated brands) for medical policy, technology assessment, credentialing,

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary and utilization management. Prior to his current position, he served as chief medical officer for Rush Prudential Health Plans; director in Healthcare Business Consulting for Arthur Andersen; and vice president of medical affairs and medical director for Aetna US Healthcare of the Midwest, Inc. Dr. Rosenberg received his undergraduate training from Columbia University and received his medical degree from New York University Medical School. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Chicago, Michael Reese Hospital. Dr. Rosenberg is a fellow of the Institute of Medicine of Chicago, serves as a board member of American Association of Preferred Provider Organizations (AAPPO), a member of the Blue Cross Association Medical Policy Panel, and several AHIP committees. Wayne A. Rosenkrans, Jr., is business strategy director for external scientific affairs at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals. In that role he has responsibility for long-range strategy development supporting AstraZeneca’s external scientific influencing policy through U.S. regulatory affairs and U.S. medical affairs. He is a recipient of the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP) Fellows Award and a former president of the society. Previous positions include global director, intelligence affairs, at AstraZeneca; director, U.S. intelligence, at AstraZeneca; Competitive Technical Intelligence Group leader and research planning analyst at Zeneca Pharmaceuticals; director of Strategic Intelligence Systems for Windhover Information; director of Drug Intelligence Systems Sales and Marketing for Adis International; and associate director and head of strategic intelligence for SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals R&D. He holds an S.B. in biology from MIT and a Ph.D. in cell and molecular biology from Boston University; he received postdoctoral training in cancer and radiation biology at the University of Rochester. John C. Rother, J.D., M.A., is the group executive officer of policy and strategy for AARP. He is responsible for the federal and state public policies of the association, for international initiatives, and for formulating AARP’s overall strategic direction. He is an authority on Medicare, managed care, long-term care, Social Security, pensions, and the challenges facing the boomer generation. Prior to coming to AARP in 1984, Mr. Rother served eight years with the U.S. Senate as special counsel for labor and health to former Senator Jacob Javits (R-NY), then as staff director and chief counsel for the Special Committee on Aging under its chairman Senator John Heinz (R-PA). He serves on several boards and commissions, including the National Health Care Quality Forum and the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation. John Rother is graduated with honors from Oberlin College and the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Stephen B. Soumerai, Sc.D., is professor of ambulatory care and prevention at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, where he directs the Drug Policy Research Group, a research program focused on pharmaceutical outcomes and quality of health care that is also a World Health Organization Collaborating Center in Pharmaceutical Policy. Dr. Soumerai is well-known for his research on the effectiveness of educational, administrative, and regulatory interventions to improve drug prescribing; economic access to medications; and the effects of pharmaceutical cost containment and coverage policies among vulnerable populations. He co-chairs the statistics and evaluative sciences concentration of Harvard University’s Ph.D. program in health policy, and has served on numerous federal scientific review committees. William W. Stead, M.D., is associate vice chancellor for health affairs and director of the Informatics Center at Vanderbilt University. In this role, he functions as chief information officer of the Vanderbilt Medical Center and chief information architect for the university. He was involved in early development of the Cardiology Databank, one of the first clinical epidemiology projects to change practice by linking outcomes to process and the Medical Record (TMR), one of the first practical computer-based patient record systems. He has led two prominent academic health centers through both planning and implementation phases of large-scale, Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) projects. Dr. Stead is McKesson Foundation Professor of Biomedical Informatics and Professor of Medicine. He is a founding fellow of both the American College of Medical Informatics and the American Institute for Engineering in Biology and Medicine, and an elected member of both the IOM and the American Clinical and Climatological Association. He was the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association and served as president of the American Association for Medical Systems and Informatics and the American College of Medical Informatics. He serves on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. He served as chairman of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine and as a presidential appointee to the Commission on Systemic Interoperability. In addition to his academic and advisory responsibilities, Dr. Stead is a director of HealthStream and director of NetSilica. Dr. Stead received his B.A. and M.D. from Duke University, where he also completed specialty and subspecialty training in internal medicine and nephrology. Donald M. Steinwachs, Ph.D., is the chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at Johns Hopkins University. He also holds the Fred and Julie Soper Professorship of Health Policy and Management.

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Dr. Steinwachs’s current research includes (1) studies of medical effectiveness and patient outcomes for individuals with specific medical, surgical, and psychiatric conditions; (2) studies of the impact of managed care and other organizational and financial arrangements on access to care, quality, utilization, and cost; and (3) studies to develop better methods to measure the effectiveness of systems of care, including case mix (e.g., ambulatory care groups), quality profiling, and indicators of outcome. He has a particular interest in the role of routine management information systems (MIS) as source of data for evaluating the effectiveness and cost of health care. This includes work on the integration of outcomes management systems with existing MIS in managed care settings. Andrew L. Stern is president of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU). Mr. Stern began his union career in 1973 as a state social service worker and rank-and-file member of SEIU Local 668. He become the first elected full-time president of the local when he was 27, and two years later in 1980 was named to the union’s International Executive Board. In 1984 he began overseeing the organizing and field services programs, and in 1996 he was elected SEIU’s international president. Stern serves on the board of directors of the Aspen Institute, Rock the Vote, and the Broad Foundation. Walter “Buzz” Stewart, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an associate chief research officer at Geisinger Health System (Danville, Pennsylvania) and director of the Center for Health Research and Rural Advocacy. The center is involved in expanding clinical and population-based research, genomics research, and the use of information technology and new healthcare models to translate knowledge to clinical practice. An expert in neuroepidemiology, Dr. Stewart has spent his career understanding the debilitating effects of chronic episodic conditions such as migraine headaches and other pain conditions (among other topics) and exploring healthcare models to improve outcomes. Dr. Stewart has authored more than 220 journal articles and book chapters. Earlier in his career, Dr. Stewart founded IMR, a clinical trials and survey research company. In 1998 IMR was acquired by AdvancePCS, where Stewart served as vice-president of clinical research and development. Dr. Stewart also started the AdvancePCS Center for Work and Health, focusing on measuring the impact of illnesses on work productivity. Prior to his tenure with AdvancePCS, he was a full-time faculty member at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and he maintains an adjunct professor position at Johns Hopkins. He earned his bachelor’s degree in the neurosciences from the University of California, Riverside; his M.P.H. from the University of California, Los Angeles; and his Ph.D. in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Sean Tunis, M.D., M.Sc., is a senior fellow at the Health Technology Center in San Francisco, where he works with healthcare decision makers to design and implement “real-world” studies of new healthcare technologies. Through September 2005, Dr. Tunis was the chief medical officer at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Before joining CMS, Dr. Tunis served as director of the health program at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment and as a health policy adviser to the U.S. Senate. He received his M.D. from Stanford University and did his residency training at UCLA and the University of Maryland in emergency medicine and internal medicine. James N. Weinstein, D.O., M.S., is professor and chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and professor of community and family medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. He is the principal investigator of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT), the largest study ever funded by the NIAMSD. He founded the Spine Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC), as well as the Center for Shared Decision-Making at DHMC. Dr. Weinstein is center director of the newly established NIH-sponsored, Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Center (MCRC) in Musculoskeletal Health Care at Dartmouth, in addition to directing other programs and centers at the Dartmouth Medical School: co-director of the Clinical Trials Center and senior member of the Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is editor-in-chief of Spine and an award-winning scholar (e.g., Bristol-Myers Career Research Award in pain research and the prestigious Kappa Delta Award), Dr. Weinstein is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Board of Directors. He is also a director of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Dr. Weinstein was presented with the ISSLS Wiltse Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006. Harlan F. Weisman, M.D., is the chief science and technology officer, medical devices and diagnostics, Johnson & Johnson (J&J). He supports the J&J Medical Devices & Diagnostics Group Operating Committee in steering the group’s scientific and technical agenda, leading investments in group-level technologies, and sponsoring the group’s research and development (R&D) talent agenda. Prior to this, he was company group chairman, research and development, pharmaceuticals, for Johnson & Johnson, where he had executive oversight of the ALZA Corporation, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development (J&JPRD), and TransForm Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Previously, Dr. Weisman was president of J&JPRD. Prior to this, he was president, research and development, at Centocor, another member of the Johnson & Johnson family of R&D companies. Before joining Centocor in 1990, Dr. Weisman was assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; consultant cardiologist,

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Johns Hopkins Hospital; and director of the Experimental Cardiac Pathology Laboratory there. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland and the University of Maryland School of Medicine. After his residency in internal medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, he did his postgraduate fellowship training in cardiovascular disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Weisman is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians, and the Councils on Clinical Cardiology and Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology of the American Heart Association. He is also a member of the American College of Physicians, the American Federation for Clinical Research, the American Medical Association, and the New Jersey Medical Society. Dr. Weisman is an author of more than 90 journal articles and book chapters in the fields of cardiovascular disease and medical product development. Jed Weissberg, M.D., is associate executive director for quality and performance improvement at the Permanente Foundation. Jed chairs the board of the Care Management Institute, New Technology Committee, the Garfield Memorial Research Fund, and the Medical Director’s Quality Committee. After joining the Permanente Medical Group in 1984, Jed became chief of GI and then became the physician-in-chief at the Fremont Medical Center. After six years, Jed joined the Permanente Federation, the governance umbrella organization for the eight Permanente Medical Groups across the country. Dr. Weissberg was educated at the University of Pennsylvania and Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed an internal medicine residency at Boston City Hospital. This was followed by a gastroenterology fellowship at Stanford and an alcoholism and substance abuse fellowship at the Palo Alto VA Hospital. Mark V. Williams, M.D., F.A.C.P., is a professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and director of the Hospital Medicine Unit for Emory Healthcare. He is also executive medical director for the Emory HCA Medical Centers. Dr. Williams established the first hospitalist program at a public hospital and now supervises the largest academic hospitalist program in the United States. A past president of the Society of Hospital Medicine and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Hospital Medicine, he actively promotes the role of hospitalists as leaders in the delivery of health care to hospitalized patients. Dr. Williams’ teaching activities center on promoting the use of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in patient care and a systems approach to patient safety. He developed the initial curriculum used to teach EBM to internal medicine residents at Emory. A strong advocate of EBM, he has participated as a tutor in the McMaster “How to Teach EBM” course and served as a member of the EBM Task Force for the Society of General Internal Medicine. With more than 50 publications,

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The Learning Healthcare System: Workshop Summary Dr. Williams’ research focuses on the role of health literacy in the delivery of health care and quality improvement, and he currently is studying the role of teamwork in the delivery of hospital care and the discharge process. Dr. Williams graduated from Emory University School of Medicine and completed residency in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. Board certified in internal medicine and emergency medicine, he also completed a Faculty Development Fellowship in general medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and the Woodruff Leadership Academy at Emory.

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