APPENDIX F
Committee and Staff Biographies

Jaime Sepúlveda, M.D., Dr.Sc. (Chair), is currently spending a sabbatical year as Visiting Professor at the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF), having received the 2007 Presidential Chair award at UCSF. Dr. Sepúlveda was appointed Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of Mexico by President Vicente Fox in 2003. As Director, he was responsible for setting policy; planning and coordinating the programs and activities of the 12 NIH institutes as well as overseeing an intramural operational budget of close to $1 billion. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Sepúlveda was elected Director General of the National Institute of Public Health (INSP), 1 of the 12 NIH institutes in 1995, and reelected to a second term in 2000. He also served as the Dean of the National School of Public Health (NSPH), the first and most prestigious school in Latin America. As Director General of Epidemiology (1985–1991) and Vice-Minister of Health (1991–1994), he strengthened the country’s Epidemiologic Surveillance System and founded the Universal Vaccination Program, which increased coverage for preschool vaccination from 45 to 94 percent in 2 years, and successfully eliminated poliomyelitis and diphtheria from Mexico. He was the founding chair of the National AIDS Committee (CONASIDA) and oversaw all AIDS prevention efforts in the country from 1986 to 1994. Among his many international responsibilities, he chaired the Advisory Committee to the Editors of the Disease Control Priorities Project in Developing Countries (2nd edition); a joint project between Fogarty International Center and the World Bank, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the World Health Organization. He currently serves on the Harvard Board



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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise APPENDIX F Committee and Staff Biographies Jaime Sepúlveda, M.D., Dr.Sc. (Chair), is currently spending a sabbatical year as Visiting Professor at the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF), having received the 2007 Presidential Chair award at UCSF. Dr. Sepúlveda was appointed Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of Mexico by President Vicente Fox in 2003. As Director, he was responsible for setting policy; planning and coordinating the programs and activities of the 12 NIH institutes as well as overseeing an intramural operational budget of close to $1 billion. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Sepúlveda was elected Director General of the National Institute of Public Health (INSP), 1 of the 12 NIH institutes in 1995, and reelected to a second term in 2000. He also served as the Dean of the National School of Public Health (NSPH), the first and most prestigious school in Latin America. As Director General of Epidemiology (1985–1991) and Vice-Minister of Health (1991–1994), he strengthened the country’s Epidemiologic Surveillance System and founded the Universal Vaccination Program, which increased coverage for preschool vaccination from 45 to 94 percent in 2 years, and successfully eliminated poliomyelitis and diphtheria from Mexico. He was the founding chair of the National AIDS Committee (CONASIDA) and oversaw all AIDS prevention efforts in the country from 1986 to 1994. Among his many international responsibilities, he chaired the Advisory Committee to the Editors of the Disease Control Priorities Project in Developing Countries (2nd edition); a joint project between Fogarty International Center and the World Bank, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the World Health Organization. He currently serves on the Harvard Board

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise of Overseers (2002–2008). He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2004. Dr. Sepúlveda earned his M.D. at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in 1978, followed by an M.P.H. in 1980, an M.S. in Tropical Medicine in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Population Science in 1985, all from the Harvard School of Public Health. Helen Smits, M.D., M.A.C.P. (Vice Chair), has just completed a Fulbright Lectureship in the new Masters in Public Health offered at the Faculty of Medicine of Eduardo Mondlane University in Mozambique. She also served as a Clinton Foundation volunteer working with the Mozambican Ministry of Health task force that developed a “business plan” to scale up AIDS treatment and prevention. During 2003 and the first half of 2004 she served on a volunteer basis as the Foundation’s representative to the group of bilateral donors engaged in the Sector-Wide Approach with the Mozambican Ministry of Health. She is currently working with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (Boston) and The Health Foundation (London) on quality improvement projects in Southern Africa. She has expertise in general health policy, with particular emphasis on quality monitoring. Dr. Smits served from 1993 to 1996 as the Deputy Administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She has served on several committees with the IOM, and was recently review coordinator for the IOM’s publication Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic. She served from 1996 to 2000 as a member of the Board of Governors of the Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health. She also served as co-chair of the Strategic Framework Board of the National Quality Forum, and is a former member and former Chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Health Care Organizations (JCAHO). Her most recent academic appointment was as Visiting Professor at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University. She has also been Professor of Community Medicine at the University of Connecticut and Associate Professor of Medicine and Public Health at Yale. Charles Carpenter, M.D. (Treatment Subcommittee Chair), is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Brown University AIDS Center at Brown University. In 1962, Carpenter started the Johns Hopkins Cholera Research program in Calcutta, India, where he demonstrated the value of antibiotics and defined the fluid requirements essential for the treatment of cholera. At Johns Hopkins he built an infectious disease program focused on enteric pathogens; during his tenure as Chair of the Department of Medicine at Case Western Reserve Medical School he developed the first Division of Geographic Medicine within a Department of Medicine in the United States. Since moving to Brown University in 1986, he has focused on the

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise global AIDS epidemic. He directed the Brown University International Health Institute from 1995 to 2001, and has worked with colleagues in the Philippines and India to prevent the spread of HIV in those nations. He is the director of The Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research (CFAR). He currently serves as a member of the Executive Committee of a Fogarty AIDS International Research and Training program that is based at Brown University. He has participated on numerous WHO Expert Advisory Committees on Infectious Diseases. He was a member of the founding Board of Directors of the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research in Dacca, Bangladesh. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has served on seven National Academies committees. James Curran, M.D., M.P.H. (Prevention Subcommittee Chair), Professor of Epidemiology and Dean of the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, has become Chair of the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the IOM. Previously a Fellow at the Harvard Center for Community Health and Medical Care, Dr. Curran began his career with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and had a leadership position in HIV/AIDS from 1981 to 1995. He also is currently Director of the Emory Center for AIDS Research. He is a member of the IOM of the National Academy of Sciences. The Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention focuses on issues affecting the health of the public, including population-based public health measures and the public health infrastructure. In addition to his involvement with this Board, he has served on over 15 other National Academies committees. William L. Holzemer, R.N., Ph.D., FAAN (Care Subcommittee Chair), is Professor and Associate Dean for International Programs, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco. His research focuses upon living well with HIV as a chronic illness, including dimensions of quality of life, adherence, stigma, and symptoms. One of his current projects is a study of the impact of stigma on quality of life for people living with HIV and on quality of worklife for nurses who care for people living with HIV in five African countries. Dr. Holzemer received a Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from Syracuse University and a BSN from San Francisco State University. He has served on one previous National Academies committee. Stefano M. Bertozzi, Ph.D., M.D., is the founding Director of the Division of Health Economics & Policy at Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health (INSP). He directs its Masters Program in Health Economics, offered jointly with the Center for Economic Research and Teaching (CIDE) in Mexico City. He is a visiting faculty member at both CIDE and the

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise University of California, Berkeley. He is currently Chairman of the UNAIDS Reference Group on Economics, member of the Technical Evaluation Reference Group of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, member of the Editorial Boards of AIDS and Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, former member of the Board of Trustees and of the Council on Scientific Affairs of the American Medical Association, and former member of advisory boards or steering committees of AIDSCAP, Synergy, ProCAARE, the International AIDS and Economics Network, and several international AIDS conferences and summits. Dr. Bertozzi’s research focuses on a diverse range of projects in health economics and policy, the largest concentration of which is on the economic aspects of HIV/AIDS and on the health impact of large social programs. Before joining the INSP he worked with UNAIDS, the former WHO Global Programme on AIDS (GPA), the Government of Zaire, and the World Bank. He was responsible for overseeing the last year of GPA as its Acting Director and Director of Research and Intervention Development before moving to UNAIDS as Coordinator, Policy, Strategy, and Research. At the World Bank he worked with Mead Over on some of the first analyses of the impact of AIDS in developing countries. He has lived in and/or worked with developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America since 1988 and speaks English, French, Spanish, and Italian. Dr. Bertozzi received his B.S. in Biology and Ph.D. in Health Policy and Management from MIT, his M.D. from UCSD, and residency training in internal medicine at UCSF. Geoff Garnett, Ph.D., is Professor of Microparasite Epidemiology at Imperial College London. He has degrees in Zoology and Biological Computation from the University of Sheffield and University of York, studied the population biology of varicella-zoster virus for his Ph.D. at Sheffield University, and has held Wellcome Trust and Royal Society Fellowships at Oxford University and Imperial College London. He is currently Director of a Masters Programme in Epidemiology at Imperial College and is Leader of the Public and International Health Strategy in the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College London. His major research goals are to integrate field and theoretical studies of the biological and behavioral patterns determining the incidence and prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (including HIV) and to understand the impact of interventions these infections. He is Chair of the UNAIDS Reference Group on Estimates, Models and Projections. Ruth Macklin, Ph.D., is Professor of Bioethics in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Her work focuses on ethics in research involving human subjects with a special interest in international collaborative research conducted in developing countries. Other areas of interest are HIV/AIDS and reproductive

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise health, justice in global health, access to treatment, public health, assisted reproduction, and research involving embryos and stem cells. Dr. Macklin was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1989. She serves on the Scientific and Ethical Review Group of the Human Reproduction Programme at the WHO and is a member of the Vaccine Advisory Group for HIV/AIDS vaccine research, also at WHO. She is a member of the Global Reference Group on Human Rights and HIV/AIDS at UNAIDS and chairs the external advisory committee of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She is Co-director of a training program in research ethics in Latin America, sponsored by the Fogarty International Center of the NIH. Her latest book is Double Standards in Medical Research in Developing Countries, published by Cambridge University Press. Affette McCaw-Binns, Ph.D., received her Ph.D. in Perinatal Epidemiology from the University of Bristol in England. She is a Professor in the Department of Community Health and Psychiatry at the University of the West Indies, Mona, in Kingston, Jamaica. Her research is concerned with the epidemiology of perinatal deaths and maternal mortality in the Caribbean, as well as antenatal and perinatal care in that region. She has recently published on “Strategies to prevent eclampsia in a developing country: I. Re-organisation of maternity services and II. Use of a maternal pictorial card” and “Skilled birth attendant competence: An initial assessment in four countries, and implications for the Safe Motherhood movement.” Dr. McCaw-Binns has been a member of the Pan American Health Organization’s Technical and Advisory Group of the Regional Plan for Action for the Reduction of Maternal Mortality in the Americas. She has served on one prior National Academies committee. A. David Paltiel, Ph.D., is Professor of Public Health and Managerial Sciences at the Yale School of Medicine. He also holds a faculty appointment at the Yale School of Management. His research interests deal broadly with issues of resource allocation and decision making in health and medicine. An expert in the application of mathematical and economic simulation models to inform public choice and clinical practice, he has conducted numerous cost-effectiveness analyses of HIV/AIDS prevention, testing, and treatment interventions. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of both Medical Decision Making and Value in Health. He received his Ph.D. in Operations Research from Yale. He has served on one prior National Academies committee. Priscilla Reddy, M.P.H., Ph.D., is Director of the Health Promotion Research and Development Unit at the Medical Research Council of South Africa. She has optained postgraduate qualifications from the United States

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise and the Netherlands. She is one of the leading experts in South Africa on behavioral science of HIV, AIDS, and sexually transmitted diseases. She has been principal investigator on several NIH RO1 grants. She is also Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral Science and Health Promotion at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory and Georgetown University. She is a member of the South African Academy of Science and serves on the council. Dr. Reddy has served on one prior National Academies committee. David Ross, Sc.D., is Director of the Public Health Informatics Institute. He became the Director of All Kids Count in 2000, a program of the Institute supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and subsequently began the Institute in 2002, also with funding from RWJF. His experience spans the private health care and public health sectors. Before joining the Task Force, Dr. Ross was an executive with a private health information systems firm, a Public Health Service officer with CDC, and an executive in a private health system. Dr. Ross holds a doctoral degree in operations research from Johns Hopkins University (1980) where he was involved in health services research. After serving as Director of the Health Service Research Center, Baltimore USPHS Hospital, he became Vice President for Administration with the Wyman Park Health System. In 1983, he joined the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health. During his career at CDC, he worked in environmental health, CDC’s executive administration, and public health practice. Dr. Ross was founding director of the Information Network for Public Health Officials (INPHO), CDC’s national initiative to improve the information infrastructure of public health. His research and programmatic interests reflect those of the Institute: the strategic application of information technologies to improve public health practice. Heather Weiss, Ed.D., is the Founder and Director of Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP) and is a Senior Research Associate and Lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. From its beginning in 1983, the HFRP’s mission has been to help create more effective practices, interventions, and policies to support children’s successful development from birth to adulthood. Dr. Weiss writes, speaks, and advises on programs and polices for children and families and serves on the advisory boards of many public and private organizations. She is a consultant and advisor to numerous foundations on strategic grant making and evaluation. Her latest publications include several articles reporting on her longitudinal study of ways family involvement in children’s learning promotes development and school success, a book about how to involve families and communities in children’s learning and development, papers on how to measure and to

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise encourage youth participation in after school and youth programs, and a paper on the use of data and evaluation in democracies. Dr. Weiss received her doctorate in Education and Social Policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and she was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Yale Bush Center in Child Development and Social Policy. Subcommittee Members, Liaisons, and Study Consultants Maureen Black, Ph.D., is the John A. Scholl Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She also holds an appointment in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition in the Department of Medicine and is an adjunct professor in the Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Department of Psychology, University of Maryland Baltimore County. Dr. Black is the director of the Growth and Nutrition Clinic and chief of the Consortium on Child Development and Neurosciences. Dr. Black is a pediatric psychologist and completed her training at Emory University and the Neuropsychiatric Institute of UCLA. She has been the President of the Society of Pediatric Psychology and the Division of Children, Youth, and Family Services of the American Psychological Association. She is a member of the Psychosocial Risk and Disease Prevention Study Section of NICHD and has served on several committees for UNICEF and WHO. Dr. Black specializes in intervention research related to children’s nutrition, health, and development. She has worked on projects in Bangladesh, India, Peru, and Ethiopia. She is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology, on the Editorial Board of four other journals, and has published over 150 articles and chapters. Hoosen Coovadia, M.B.B.S., M.D., is a pediatrician and expert in perinatal transmission. Dr. Coovadia was the Head of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Natal until 2000, and is now the Victor Daitz Professor for HIV/AIDS research at the University of Natal. He has made a substantial contribution in pediatric diseases, including the definitive work on nephrosis in South African black children, malnutrition and immunity, and measles, particularly the effect of vitamin A supplementation on children with measles and other infections. He is internationally recognized for his groundbreaking research in HIV/AIDS transmission from mother to child, especially through breastfeeding and is the Protocol Chair for HIVNET 023 and HPTN 046. He is particularly committed to developing research capacity, having supervised over 40 postgraduate students and taught in the medical, nursing, and allied health professions for more than 20 years. He is also a Fellow of the University of Natal and was awarded the Star of South Africa by President Nelson Mandela for his contribution to democracy in

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise South Africa. In 1999, he was awarded the Silver Medal by the Medical Research Council for his achievements in medical research. Dr. Coovadia is a member of the Institute of Medicine in the National Academies. Henry Fomundam, Pharm.D., is a Public Health/Pharmaceutical Care Consultant with several years of international experience. Dr. Fomundam graduated from Howard University, Washington, DC, with a doctorate in Pharmaceutical Care and did a postdoctoral fellowship at the National School of Public Health (HIV/AIDS management) in South Africa and subsequently worked in the Southern, Eastern, and Central African region for the last 6 years. He is currently a Regional Director at Howard University/PACE Centre for the ROADS, HIV/AIDS Pharmaceutical Care Project in Eastern and Central Africa. Prior to working in Africa, he worked in several facilities in Washington, DC, as a pharmaceutical care clinician for Clinical Pharmacy Associate and a faculty member at Howard University international programs. In Africa he served as the Director of Pharmacovigilance, National HIV/AIDS Program in South Africa and as Coordinator of an HIV/AIDS public health training program at the National School of Public Health in South Africa. He supervised HIV/AIDS community-based research projects in South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland, and Lesotho. In South Africa he also worked as a research consultant on three major HIV/AIDS research projects at the HSRC; HIV/AIDS clinical trial project (Project Phidisa in the SA military in collaboration with NIH, SA and U.S. Departments of Defense); Medicines Control Council of South Africa to review Nevirapine use in the first 18 pilot sites. At the National HIV/AIDS Directorate he served as one of the consultants to oversee the implementation of the HIV comprehensive plan countrywide, Pharmaceutical Care Consultant for UNDP Regional Service Centre in South Africa, and a consultant for the HIV/AIDS Treatment Program for the Family Planning Association of Kenya. He has served on several national and international committees including the National Clinical Trials Committee in South Africa, Pharmacovigilance Committee, Nelson Mandela Foundation HIV/AIDS Committee, CIOMS/WHO Clinical Trials Committee, WHO/TDR Product Research Evaluation Committee and Federal Employee Program, BCBS National P and T in the United States. He is the author of an HIV/AIDS pharmacovigilance handbook in South Africa and also published research/commissioned work. Paul Gertler, Ph.D., is Professor of Economics, Haas School of Business; Professor of Health Services Finance, School of Public Health; and Faculty Director, Graduate Program in Health Services Management at the University of California, Berkeley. Historically, his research has focused on the link

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise between health, education, and poverty. He has spent recent years studying the Mexican anti-poverty program PROGRESA, a conditional cash transfer anti-poverty program that significantly reduced childhood illness, increased the health of babies and pregnant mothers among the Mexican participants, and indicated that proper health care can help end the poverty cycle among the poor. He previously served for the RAND Corporation as senior economist, and as an assistant professor at Harvard University and State University of New York at Stony Brook. He has experience in consulting and policy making with international agencies such as the World Bank, United Nations, and WHO, as well as governments in Latin America and Asia and private corporations. Carl A. Latkin, M.S., Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences, at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health with a joint appointment in the Department of Epidemiology. He has published over 100 peer review papers. Dr. Latkin has served as consultant on expert panels at CDC and NIH in developing and evaluating community-based HIV prevention interventions. He is currently serving as the Chair of the NIH and National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases first international behavioral intervention. Currently Dr. Latkin is the principal investigator of HIV prevention projects in Baltimore, India, and Russia, and is co-investigator or consultant on projects in South Africa, India, Thailand, Congo, and China. James Ntozi, M.Sc., Ph.D., is a medical demographer and statistician who has extensive experience in conducting and coordinating qualitative and quantitative monitoring and evaluation studies. Dr. Ntozi holds a bachelor’s degree in Statistics and Economics, a master’s in Statistics and Demography, and a doctorate in Medical Demography. For 18 years he held top managerial and administrative positions in Uganda and Africa, including being a Census Commissioner (1979–1984), Head of Department of Population Studies (1984–1989), and Director of the Regional Institute of Statistics & Applied Economics, Makerere University (1989–1997). He was a team leader of international and national study teams in Rwanda (HIV/AIDS Prevalence Survey in 1997/1998 funded by the World Bank), Tanzania (Evaluation of Reproductive Health Training Project in 1999 by USAID and INTRA), and Uganda (adolescent baseline study for PEARL/UNFPA in 1999/2000, evaluation for UNFPA in 2000, situation analysis in 2001 for AYA/Consult (U), baseline study in 2001 for UNICEF, and preparation of Uganda Human Development report in 2002 (for Uganda Government and UNDP). Dr. Ntozi has researched in the area of HIV/AIDS in Uganda for over a decade and published and presented over 100 scientific papers

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise including over 30 on HIV/AIDS, written 6 books, and co-edited 4 books on HIV/AIDS in Africa. He has also helped develop indicators for UNFPA, UNDP, UNECA, and UNICEF. James Sherry, M.D., Ph.D., is currently Professor of Global Health, School of Public Health and Health Services at The George Washington University, Washington, D.C. Prior to this appointment, he was Vice President of Policy, Research and Advocacy for the Global Health Council. Before joining the Global Health Council, Dr. Sherry was based in Geneva, Switzerland, serving as UNAIDS Director of Programme Development and Senior Advisor to its Executive Director, Dr. Peter Piot. There he played a crucial role in the global strategy, organizational development, and UN system reform. Earlier assignments with UNICEF headquarters included Senior Advisor to Programme Strategy, Chief of Health, and Senior Fellow at the Harvard Institute for Population and Development Studies. As a U.S. Foreign Service Officer in India, Dr. Sherry served as Director of Biomedical Research and Technology Development with USAID. He also worked as Chief of Staff for U.S. Rep. Sander M. Levin of Michigan. A graduate of Oakland University, Sherry earned a doctorate in biochemistry from Carnegie Mellon University and received his M.D. from the University of Michigan School of Medicine. Olaitan Soyannwo, M.Med., D.A., F.W.A.C.S., F.I.C.S., is a Professor of Anesthesia and a Consultant Anesthetist at the College of Medicine at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria. Her principal fields of interest are pain education, manpower development, and public information. She is also active in advocating pain management and treatment in developing countries. She has served as a consultant to the National Health Development Project in Gambia, a council member of the West African College of Surgeons, President of the Society of Anesthetists of West Africa, and Dean of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan. At the national level, she served as a member of the HIV/AIDS Palliative Care Guidelines Working Group and Consultative Committee on Cancer Control. She is the immediate past President, Society for the Study of Pain, Nigeria, a council member of the International Association for the Study of Pain, and a member of the Board of Trustees for the African Palliative Care Association. She is a Fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Science. Burton Wilcke, Jr., Ph.D., is currently the Chair of the Department of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences at the University of Vermont College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Previously Dr. Wilcke had been Director of the Divison of Health Surveillance at the Vermont Department of Health (1995–2002), where he was also Laboratory Director from 1998 to 1995.

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise As past President of the Association of Public Health Laboratories and immediate past Chair of its Leadership Development Task Force, Dr. Wilcke regularly presents to national audiences on public health issues. He was senior author for APHL on the Centers for Disease Control Mortality and Morbidity Report on Core Functions of Public Health Laboratories, and also lead the laboratory infrastructure development team in Zimbabwe as part of the CDC/APHL initiative to fight AIDS in South Africa. He received his Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology at the Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in medical and public health microbiology at the California Department of Health. He has no prior experience with the National Academies. Michael Merson, M.D. (Board on Global Health Liaison), is the founding Director of the Global Health Institute at Duke University. Prior to this appointment he was the Dean of Public Health and Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS at Yale University. Dr. Merson graduated from Amherst College (B.A.) and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. After serving as a medical intern and resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital, he spent 3 years in the Enteric Diseases Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, GA, and then served as the Chief Epidemiologist at the Cholera Research Laboratory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In 1978, he joined the World Health Organization’s Diarrheal Disease Control Programme in Geneva, Switzerland, and served as Director of the Programme from 1980 until 1990. In 1987, he was also appointed Director of the WHO Acute Respiratory Infections Control Programme. He was appointed as Director in 1990 and later as Executive Director in 1993 of the WHO Global Programme on AIDS, which was the agency initially responsible for mobilizing and coordinating the global response to the AIDS pandemic. Dr. Merson received two Commendation Medals from the U.S. Public Health Service, the Arthur S. Flemming Award, the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal, and two honorary degrees. He has served on various NIH review panels, advisory committees, and institutional boards, and has been elected to the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering and the American Epidemiological Society. Elena Nightingale, M.D., Ph.D. (Board on Children, Youth, and Families Liaison), is a Scholar-in-Residence at the IOM, and Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics at both Georgetown University Medical Center and George Washington University Medical Center. For more than 11 years she was Special Advisor to the President and Senior Program Officer at Carnegie Corporation of New York, and Lecturer in Social Medicine at Harvard University. She retired from both positions at the end of 1994. Dr. Nightingale

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise earned an A.B. in Zoology, summa cum laude, from Barnard College of Columbia University, a Ph.D. in Microbial Genetics from the Rockefeller University, and an M.D. from New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Nightingale is a member of the IOM and the Academies’ Report Review Committee. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, the New York Academy of Sciences. In her role as Scholar-in-Residence, Dr. Nightingale serves as advisor to the President and Executive Officer of the IOM. In that role she coordinated the IOM Board self-assessment process. She is also a member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Her interests are in genetics and child and adolescent health, and currently she is working on strategies for increasing participation of under-represented minorities in the work of the IOM. In 2006 Dr. Nightingale was awarded the IOM’s McDermott Medal for Distinguished Service. Julia Coffman (Consultant), is a Washington D.C.-based consultant specializing in evaluation, strategy, and communications. Since 1996 she has worked with the Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP), a research and evaluation organization at the Harvard Graduate School of Education that for over 20 years has helped develop and evaluate strategies to promote the well being of children, youth, families, and their communities. Ms. Coffman leads HFRP’s evaluation work, which includes helping organizations use evaluations to learn about and improve their strategies. HFRP conducts evaluations in areas of particular interest (typically large-scale complex initiatives), and publishes The Evaluation Exchange, a quarterly periodical on emerging evaluation theory, methods, and resources. Thomas N. Denny, M.Sc. (Consultant), is Research Associate Professor and Chief Operating Officer at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, and has 25 years of immunology experience studying host defense mechanisms. As part of the HIV clinical trials program, he has served on numerous committees for NIH over the last two decades. Previously, he served on an expert panel for CDC helping to establish clinical laboratory guidelines for using T-cell immunophenotyping in patients with HIV disease. In 1997, he received an NIH HIV Innovative Vaccine Grant award to study a new method of vaccine delivery. He is the principal investigator of the NIH-NIAID Division of AIDS Immunology Quality Assurance Program. Mr. Denny was a 2002–2003 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow at the IOM. As a Fellow, he served on the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee with legislation/policy responsibilities in global AIDS, bioterrorism, clinical trials/human subject protection and vaccine-related issues. He has extensive international experi-

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise ence and is a consultant to the U.S. CDC for the PEPFAR project to oversee development of an HIV laboratory network in Guyana. In early 2004, he was awarded a Fogarty International HIV Grant for a project in Burkina Faso. In September 2004, IOM appointed him as a consultant to its Board on Global Health Committees studying the options for overseas placement of U.S. health professionals. Previously, Mr. Denny helped establish a small laboratory in the Republic of Kalmykia (former Soviet Union) to improve the care of children with HIV/AIDS. As a Board Member of the Children of Chernobyl Relief Fund Foundation, Mr. Denny focused on donor recruitment, program planning and assessment, and medical mission/training for Ukrainian physician scientists. Mr. Denny has authored or co-authored more than 75 peer-reviewed papers and serves on the Editorial Boards of Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, Communications in Cytometry, and Clinical and Applied Immunology Reviews. He holds an M.Sc. in Molecular and Biomedical Immunology from the University of East London. In 1991 he completed a course of study in Strategic Management at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. In 1993, he completed the Program for Advanced Training in Biomedical Research Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. Mr. Denny is active in his community gaining additional experience from two publicly elected positions. In 1994, he was elected to the Cranford Board of Education, a K–12 district of more than 3,000 students and a budget exceeding $30 million. He served in various capacities before being elected Vice-president of the Board in 1995. In 1996, Mr. Denny was elected to his first term on the Cranford Township Committee (municipal governing body) and re-elected to a second term in 1999 followed by a term as Mayor of Cranford. In 2000, Mr. Denny was selected by the New Jersey League of Municipalities to serve on the New Jersey Community Mental Health Citizens’ Advisory Board and Mental Health Planning Council. Florencia Zulberti, M.P.H. (Consultant), is Assistant Director for Global Health at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of Mexico. Prior to joining the Mexican government in 2004, she was an HIV/AIDS Consultant to the World Food Programme based in Rome, Italy, and the Major Gifts Officer for the New York office of Médecins Sans Frontières. In 2000, she managed the financial, administrative, and human resource operations of a local technology access center located in East Palo Alto, California, called Plugged In and served as a human resource consultant for Impact Networks, an Internet provider in the Philippines. From 1997 to 2000 Ms. Zulberti worked for the Boston-based public health consultancy firm, John Snow Inc., where she backstopped several USAID/World Bank-funded projects, mainly in Morocco and Venezuela, before heading to Zambia to support the JSI Family Planning and HIV/AIDS project. Ms. Zulberti began

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise her professional career as a Camp Sadako Volunteer for the United Nations Commissioner for Refugees in Chiapas, Mexico, where she worked on a human rights and reproductive health project with Guatemalan refugees. Ms. Zulberti received her MPH in International Health with an emphasis on reproductive health, family planning, and HIV/AIDS prevention programs from Boston University in 1997. In 1996 she received her B.A. in Psychology and Health from Queens University in Canada. IOM Staff Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H., joined the Institute of Medicine in July 2003, serving as the Director of the Board on Global Health and the Board on African Academy Science Development. Previously he served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. In his last Department of Defense (DoD) position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the presidentially -mandated DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS). This responsibility entailed managing approximately $42 million of emerging infections surveillance, response, training, and capacity-building activities undertaken in partnership with numerous elements of the federal government and with health ministries in over 45 developing countries. He also designed and established the DoD Accessions Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity, the first systematic DoD effort to apply epidemiology to the evidence-based development and evaluation of physical and psychological accession standards. Dr. Kelley is an experienced communicator having lectured in over 20 countries and authored over 50 scholarly papers and book chapters. He also designed and served as the specialty editor for the two volume textbook entitled Military Preventive Medicine: Mobilization and Deployment. Dr. Kelley obtained his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Dr.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Rosemary Chalk is the Director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the Committee on Adolescent Health and Development, both of which are joint efforts of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. Ms. Chalk is a policy analyst who has been a study director for the National Academies since 1987. She has directed or served as a senior staff member for over a dozen studies within the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council, including studies on vaccine finance, the public health infrastructure for immunization, family violence, child abuse and neglect, research ethics and misconduct in science, and education finance. From 2000 to 2003, Ms. Chalk also directed a research project

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise on the development of child well-being indicators for the child welfare system at Child Trends in Washington, D.C. She has previously served as a consultant for science and society research projects at the Harvard School of Public Health and was an Exxon Research Fellow in the Program on Science, Technology, and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was the program head of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science from 1976 to 1986. Ms. Chalk has a B.A. in foreign affairs from the University of Cincinnati. Michele Orza, Sc.D., is a scholar with the IOM’s Board on Global Health where she is Study Director for the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Evaluation. Currently, she is also serving as Acting Director of IOM’s Board on Health Care Services. Previously, she has served as Assistant Director of the Health Care Team at the Government Accountability Office where she was responsible for managing study teams evaluating a wide range of federal programs. For several years she also served as Director of Science and Research at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) where her department was responsible for supporting the college’s evidence-based medicine activities including clinical guidelines, performance measures, data standards, and quality improvement projects. Prior to coming to Washington, D.C., she worked as a research assistant in the Technology Assessment Group at the Harvard School of Public Health. While there she worked on a wide variety of methods for and applications of systematic reviews and meta-analysis and other tools to promote and support evidence-based public health. Dr. Orza received both her M.S. in Health Policy and Management and her Sc.D. in Program Evaluation from the Harvard School of Public Health and received the first B.A. in Women’s Studies from Harvard/Radcliffe University. Kimberly A. Scott, M.S.P.H., joined the IOM’s Board on Global Health in September 2005 as the Senior Program Officer for the PEPFAR evaluation. She has worked in public health for nearly 20 years with an emphasis on service planning, delivery, and evaluation related to community mental health and to HIV/AIDS care, prevention, and treatment. She has also been a national trainer and consultant for many topical issues in public health, including HIV/AIDS, diabetes management, and cultural competence in the provision of clinical and social services in public health settings. Prior to IOM, she was an analyst on the health care team at the U.S. Government Accountability Office focusing on public health programs and policies including childhood obesity in the United States and evaluation of the PEPFAR program. Prior to returning to graduate school, she worked at Duke University’s Center for Health Policy, Law, and Management as an

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise agency coordinator to integrate mental health services into the continuum of care for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS in 54 counties in North Carolina. She has also served as Executive Director of a Ryan White-funded HIV/AIDS consortium that developed a comprehensive ambulatory care system for 21 mostly rural counties in North Carolina. She has also served on a number of advisory committees to the Governor of North Carolina as well as the Secretary of NC DHHS for programmatic and policy issues related to HIV care, prevention, and treatment in North Carolina. She received her undergraduate degree in Psychology from the University of Virginia as well as an M.S. in Public Health with a concentration in health policy analysis from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Lucía Fort, M.P.H., M.P.A., joined the IOM’s Board on Global Health in November 2005 as a program officer for the PEPFAR evaluation. Before coming to IOM, she was a health care analyst with the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), where she planned and conducted reviews of the internal operations of individual government agencies and multi-agency programs. Her work at GAO included a review of per capita medical care spending and coverage policies provided for populations served by the Indian Health Service and an assessment of the expenditure and obligation of funds awarded by CDC for bioterrorism preparedness. She was a consultant with the Dominican Network of People Living with HIV in Santo Domingo and with Family Care International’s Latin America and Caribbean Division. She also coordinated community outreach programs for young adults and Latina women at Whitman-Walker Clinic, a large AIDS service organization in Washington, D.C. She received her M.P.A. from the School of International and Public Affairs and her M.P.H. from the Mailman School of Public Health, both at Columbia University. J. Alice Nixon, M.A., recently joined the IOM’s Board on Global Health in July 2005 as a program officer for the Committee for the Evaluation of PEPFAR Implementation. Prior to coming to the Board, Alice focused on health care utilization and international health program evaluation. She worked as a project manager at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) examining urban/rural differences in health care expenditures and access to care using AHRQ’s Medical Expenditure Panel Study (MEPS). Most recently, she was a health care analyst at the GAO conducting research related to U.S.-funded international public health programs and initiatives, including evaluations of U.S. global malaria control initiatives and PEPFAR. Ms. Nixon has a degree in Sociology with a minor in Fine Arts from Goucher College as well as a master’s in Medical Sociology from the University of Maryland.

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PEPFAR Implementation: Progress and Promise Angela Mensah joined the IOM’s Board on Global Health in June 2005 as Senior Program Assistant and is currently providing support to the PEPFAR evaluation. Over the past 13 years, Angela has been involved primarily in business and project management serving as a small business advisor with Empretec Ghana Foundation (a United Nations Project), Administrative Assistant at the American College of Cardiology, Project Manager with a Private Events and Project Management Firm implementing national projects and private initiatives in Ghana, and Office Manager at a private medical practice at the Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C. She also served as a member of Ghana’s delegation to South Africa to understudy the National Job Summit held in South Africa in October 1998, Lead Coordinator and Organizer of the first Business Support Services Expo in Ghana, and President of the Soroptimist International, Kumasi Club (Ghana), an international charity organization for women in the various professions that championed amongst other projects an Aids Orphans Project. Ms. Mensah graduated from the University of Science and Technology in Ghana with an associate degree in Data Processing and Office Management and Secretarial Duties from East London Polytechnic, respectively. She is currently pursuing a Certificate Program in Project Management at Kaplan University. Kimberly Weingarten was Senior Program Assistant for the study evaluating PEPFAR in the Board on Global Health until September 2006. In May of 2004 she returned from Zambia where she served for over 2 years with the Peace Corps. As a Community Action for Health Volunteer, Kimberly focused primarily on HIV/AIDS sensitization, education, and outreach. Prior to her Peace Corps service, she volunteered with various organizations such as the American Red Cross and NOVAM (Northern Virginia AIDS Ministry). She graduated from San Francisco State University in 2000 with a B.A. in Psychology and a minor in Human Sexuality Studies.

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