APPENDIX D
Committee Biographies

Richard B. Johnston, Jr., M.D. (Chair), is associate dean for research development and a professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and is executive vice-president for academic affairs at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center. His research interests include the mechanisms of resistance to infection, the cell biology of neutrophils and macrophages, immune deficiency diseases, and child health. He has published more than 260 papers on these topics. Dr. Johnston has served as the chair of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania; medical director of the March of Dimes; chief of pediatric immunology at Yale; chair of the advisory committee on vaccines for the Food and Drug Administration; a member of the Advisory Committee for the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and president of three academic pediatric societies. He has previously chaired six Institute of Medicine (IOM) or National Research Council committees and has served as a member on other IOM committees and on the Board of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He was elected to the IOM in 1994 and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received an M.D. from Vanderbilt University.


Susan M. Allan, M.D., J.D., M.P.H., is the public health director for the Oregon Department of Human Services. Prior to assuming that position, Dr. Allan worked in local public health for 20 years, including 17 years as the director for the Arlington County Department of Human Services in



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Training Physicians For Public Health Careers APPENDIX D Committee Biographies Richard B. Johnston, Jr., M.D. (Chair), is associate dean for research development and a professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and is executive vice-president for academic affairs at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center. His research interests include the mechanisms of resistance to infection, the cell biology of neutrophils and macrophages, immune deficiency diseases, and child health. He has published more than 260 papers on these topics. Dr. Johnston has served as the chair of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania; medical director of the March of Dimes; chief of pediatric immunology at Yale; chair of the advisory committee on vaccines for the Food and Drug Administration; a member of the Advisory Committee for the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and president of three academic pediatric societies. He has previously chaired six Institute of Medicine (IOM) or National Research Council committees and has served as a member on other IOM committees and on the Board of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He was elected to the IOM in 1994 and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received an M.D. from Vanderbilt University. Susan M. Allan, M.D., J.D., M.P.H., is the public health director for the Oregon Department of Human Services. Prior to assuming that position, Dr. Allan worked in local public health for 20 years, including 17 years as the director for the Arlington County Department of Human Services in

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Training Physicians For Public Health Careers Arlington, Virginia. Dr. Allan has been very active in a number of capacities with the National Association of County and City Health Officials and now with Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, including representating them on the Council on Linkages between Academia and Public Health Practice. She participated in the inaugural year of the CDC’s National Public Health Leadership Institute. She has also had medical training in small rural clinics in such developing countries as Colombia. She served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Recently she was appointed to the IOM’s Board of Population Health and Public Health Practice. She earned medical and law doctoral degrees from Harvard University, and she received a master of public health degree from Johns Hopkins. She is board certified in public health and general preventive medicine by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Allan was appointed to the governing board of the Council on Education for Public Health in 2004 by the American Public Health Association for a term that extended through 2009. Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., F.A.C.P., has been executive director of the American Public Health Association (APHA) since December 2002. Prior to joining APHA, Dr. Benjamin was secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he played a key role in developing the state’s bioterrorism plan. From 1995 to 1999 he served as deputy secretary for public health services. Dr. Benjamin has also worked extensively in the field of emergency medicine. He was chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington; chief of emergency medicine at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center; and chair of the Community Health and Ambulatory Care Department at the District of Columbia General Hospital. From 1990 to 1991 he served as the District of Columbia’s Commissioner of Public Health. He has taught emergency medicine at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a former fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Dr. Benjamin has held a variety of positions with the American College of Emergency Physicians, including president and vice president of the DC chapter, chair of the Injury Control Committee, a member of the Governmental Affairs Committee, and a member of the Health Policy Committee. He also served as president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (2001 and 2002) and has sat on the editorial board of the Journal of the National Medical Association.

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Training Physicians For Public Health Careers Dan G. Blazer III, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., is J. P. Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. During Dr. Blazer’s tenure as the dean of medical education, he expanded a master of public health program for medical school students, which now attracts more than 20 percent of the medical school class. Dr. Blazer is the author or editor of more than 30 books and is the author or coauthor of more than 300 peer-reviewed articles on topics including depression, epidemiology, and consultation liaison psychiatry. He is a fellow of the American College of Psychiatry and the American Psychiatric Association and is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), with expertise in medical education, religion and medicine, and preventive medicine and public health. He was elected to the IOM in 1995. Linda Hawes Clever, M.D., is the chief of occupational health at the California Pacific Medical Center and president of the not-for-profit organization RENEW. After receiving undergraduate and medical degrees at Stanford University, she completed medical residency and fellowships in infectious diseases and community medicine at Stanford and the University of California, San Francisco. She was a regent of the American College of Physicians and is a master in that college. She served as editor of the Western Journal of Medicine, is a fellow of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and is a member of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Clever serves on the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health Policy Advisory Council and is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. She served on the Stanford University Board of Trustees and chaired the Boards of KQED and University High School. Her publications are focused on occupational health, personal and professional renewal, ethics, and volunteerism. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1981. David W. Fleming, M.D., is director of the Department of Public Health in Seattle/King County. Prior to assuming that role, Dr. Fleming directed the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Health Strategies Program. In this capacity, Dr. Fleming oversaw the foundation’s portfolios in vaccine-preventable diseases, nutrition, newborn and child health, leadership, emergency relief, and cross-cutting strategies to improve access to health tools in developing countries. Dr. Fleming has published on a wide range of public health issues and has served on multiple boards and commissions, including the board of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization. Dr. Fleming received a medical degree from the State University of New York Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse. He is board certified in internal medicine and preventive medicine and serves on the

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Training Physicians For Public Health Careers faculties of the Departments of Public Health at both the University of Washington and Oregon Health Sciences University. Kristine M. Gebbie, Dr.P.H., R.N., is the Elizabeth Standish Gill Associate Professor of Nursing and director of the Center for Health Policy at the Columbia University School of Nursing. She just completed 4 years as a senior consultant on public health initiatives to the Office of Public Health and Science, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She has conducted extensive research on health policy, public health nurses, and public health laws and is a recognized expert in the enumeration and development of the public health workforce. Dr. Gebbie is an Institute of Medicine (IOM) member with expertise in public health systems and infrastructures, HIV/AIDS prevention policy development, state and local public health practice, and public health nursing. She was elected to the IOM in 1992. Lewis R. Goldfrank, M.D., has worked at the Bellevue Hospital Center and the New York University Medical Center for the last quarter century. He is currently the first chair and professor of the newly established academic Department of Emergency Medicine at New York University. He is also the medical director of the New York City Health Department’s Poison Center. Educated at Clark University, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and the University of Brussels in Brussels, Belgium, he graduated from the University of Brussels Medical School in 1970. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center in 1973. His efforts have led to the development of New York University’s emergency medicine and medical toxicology residencies. He has served as the chair of the American Board of Emergency Medicine’s Subboard on Medical Toxicology, the American Board of Medical Toxicology, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. His entire career has been spent working in the public hospitals of New York City, emphasizing the role of emergency medicine in improving access to care, public health, public policy, and medical humanism. He is senior editor of Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies, a standard text in medical toxicology, the eighth edition of which was published in 2006. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. He has participated on three IOM committees on terrorism: the Committee on R&D for Improving Civilian Medical Response to Chemical and Biological Terrorism (1998 to 1999); the Committee on Assessing Metropolitan Medical Response Teams: Preparedness for Terrorism (1999 to 2002); and the Committee on Psychological Consequences of Terrorism (2002 to 2003). He chaired the last two of these committees. He currently chairs the standing committee at the IOM on Personal Protective Equip-

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Training Physicians For Public Health Careers ment in the Workforce. As part of his investigations on preparedness, he has developed and led a consortium on preparedness with the New York City Department of Health, led the New York University School of Medicine Consortium on Preparedness, was the principal investigator for a Large Scale Emergency Readiness grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was a co-principal investigator on a Public Health Research grant (Health Protection Research Initiative) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. James M. Hughes, M.D., received a B.A. in 1966 and an M.D. in 1971 from Stanford University. He completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of Washington and a fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of Virginia. He is board certified in internal medicine, infectious diseases, and preventive medicine. He first joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in 1973. During his CDC career, he has worked primarily in the areas of food-borne and waterborne diseases, infection control in health care settings, and emerging infections. He became director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases in 1992. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served as assistant surgeon general in the United States Public Health Service. He has directed the Program in Global Infectious Diseases and the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University since 2005. Nicole Lurie, M.D., M.S.P.H., is a senior natural scientist and the Paul O’Neill Alcoa Professor of Health Policy at the RAND Corporation. Before that, she had a long affiliation with the University of Minnesota, where she was professor of medicine and public health. Most recently, she has been medical advisor to the commissioner at the Minnesota Department of Health. From 1998 to 2001, she took a leave of absence to serve as principal deputy assistant secretary of health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Lurie has a long history in the health services research field, primarily in the areas of access to and quality of care, managed care, mental health, prevention, and health disparities. Dr. Lurie attended college and medical school at the University of Pennsylvania and completed her residency and master of science of public health at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she was also a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation clinical scholar. She serves as senior editor for Health Services Research and has served on the editorial boards and as a reviewer for numerous journals. She has served on the council and was president of the Society of General Internal Medicine, is currently on the board of directors for the Academy of Health Services Research, and

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Training Physicians For Public Health Careers has served on multiple other national committees. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Academy of Health Services Research Young Investigator Award, the Nellie Westerman Prize for Research in Ethics, and the Heroine in Health Care Award, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. In addition to her work in health services research and health policy, Dr. Lurie continues to practice clinical medicine in the health care safety net and is the mother of three children. Tara A. McCarthy, M.D., M.P.H., is a board-certified pediatrician with 8 years of experience in public health and clinical epidemiology. She spent 2 years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was assigned to the Connecticut Department of Public Health, conducting outbreak investigations, developing a surveillance system for West Nile virus, evaluating the latent tuberculosis HIV/AIDS surveillance system, and developing and conducting case-control and cohort studies. She currently works as the medical consultant for the Communicable Disease Control Division of the Boston Public Health Commission, dealing mainly with issues related to infectious diseases and bioterrorism. Her publications include articles on West Nile virus and infectious disease outbreaks. Dr. McCarthy received an undergraduate degree from Duke University. She graduated from Tufts University School of Medicine with an M.D., M.P.H., degree and was a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. She did her pediatric training at the Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Boston and the Boston Medical Center. Louis Rowitz, Ph.D., is professor of community health sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Rowitz’s work has focused on public health practice with an emphasis on leadership and has authored several publications on this topic. He received his master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana in the field of sociology. Dr. Rowitz is currently director of the Mid-America Regional Public Health Leadership Institute and Mid-America Public Health Training Center. Joseph J. Schwerha, M.D., M.P.H., is professor of occupational and environmental medicine in the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh and is the director of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency and the Public Health Preparedness and Disaster Response Certificate programs. He holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh, a master of public health degree in environmental health and industrial hygiene from the University of Michigan, and a medical degree from West Virginia University School of Medicine. Prior to working at the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Schwerha was general manager—health services and corporate medical director at

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Training Physicians For Public Health Careers the U.S. Steel Corporation for many years. In this capacity he was responsible for the Medical, Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and Employee Assistance Programs; Workers’ Compensation; and Family Medical Centers (including psychiatric managed care) for the U.S. Steel Corporation world wide. He is actively involved in the editorial boards of the Journal of Emergency Management, Journal of Managed Care Medicine, and Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, with a bimonthly column, and is a member of the Official Disability Guidelines (Work-Loss Data Institute) Editorial Advisory Board. He serves as chair of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Committee of the Allegheny County Medical Society. In the past he has been involved with the Board of Directors of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the Mine Health Research Advisory Committee of the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, and the Board of Directors of the National Safety Council and was clinical associate professor of medicine in the Section of Occupational Medicine and clinical associate professor of community medicine at West Virginia University. Among the honors he has received are the Federal Aviation Administration Service Award and the Knudsen Award, which is the highest international award in occupational medicine, from the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (2005). His research interests are in medical administration and education as well as all aspects of environmental health and medical surveillance. Robert Wallace, M.D., M.Sc., is professor of epidemiology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa Colleges of Public Health and Medicine and director of the university’s Center on Aging. He has been a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the National Advisory Council on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and is currently chair of IOM’s developing Board on Military and Veterans Health. He is the author or coauthor of more than 250 publications and 22 book chapters and has been the editor of four books, including the current edition of Maxcy-Rosenau-Last’s Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Wallace’s research interests are in clinical and population epidemiology and focus on the causes and prevention of disabling conditions of older people. He has substantial experience in the conduct of both observational cohort studies of older people and clinical trials, including preventive interventions related to fracture, cancer, coronary disease, and women’s health. He is the site principal investigator for the Women’s Health Initiative, a national intervention trial exploring the prevention of breast and colon cancer and coronary disease, and a co-principal investigator of the Health and Retirement Study, a national cohort study of the health and economic status of older Americans. He has been a collaborator in several international studies of the causes and prevention of chronic illness in older people.

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