Appendixes



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Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects Appendixes

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Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects APPENDIX A About the Authors Paul Risser (chair) is Chair and Chief Operating Officer, University Research Cabinet of the University of Oklahoma. Until recently, he was Chancellor of the Oklahoma State System of Higher Education, where he led a state system comprised of 25 state colleges and universities, 9 constituent agencies, and 1 higher education center. Dr. Risser led two universities as President, Oregon State University (1996-2002) and Miami University of Ohio (19931996). Dr. Risser’s research specialties are the flow of energy and materials through grassland and forested ecosystems, the effects of climate on plant community productivity, and landscape ecology. He has served as chair of the National Research Council (NRC) Board of Environmental Studies and Toxicology and as a member of numerous NRC committees. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He now chairs the Science Committee of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC. Chancellor Risser previously served as Secretary-General of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment, Paris, France, and as Program Director for Ecosystem Studies at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Risser has also served as President of three scientific organizations, the American Institute of Biological Sciences, the Ecological Society of America, and the Association of Southwestern Naturalists. He received his Ph.D. in botany and soils from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Ingrid Burke is a Professor in the Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship at Colorado State University, where she is also a University Distinguished Teaching Scholar. Her areas of interests are in soil

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Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects organic matter dynamics, ecosystem ecology, biogeochemistry, regional modeling, and global change, as well as pedagogical techniques. She has served as a member of the NRC Committee to Review EPA’s Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program and as a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. She is an associate editor of Ecological Applications and has been on the editorial board of Ecosystems and Forest Ecology and Management. She is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Biological Sciences, and the Ecological Society of America. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Wyoming. Christopher Clark is the I.P. Johnson Director of the Bioacoustics Research Program at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. He also is a Senior Scientist and member of the graduate faculty in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell University. His research interests are in the development and application of passive acoustic techniques for understanding how and why animals communicate and to monitor the health of wildlife populations. He directed the development of Canary and Raven, software programs used by scientists to study the sounds of birds and other animals. He arrived at Cornell in 1987 after seven years at The Rockefeller University as a postdoctoral fellow and assistant professor. He received an M.S. in Engineering and a Ph.D. in Biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Mary English is a Research Leader at the Energy, Environment and Resources Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her current research interests include land-use and growth-management planning at the local and state levels, political and economic conditions for sustainable consumption, and participatory processes for environmental decision making. Her research has focused on ways in which environmental decision-making processes can be improved. Dr. English is a member of the Tennessee Air Pollution Control Board. She also has served on the NRC’s Board on Radioactive Waste Management and several NRC study committees, including the Committee on Remediation of Buried and Tank Wastes as Vice-Chair and as a member on the Committee on Prioritization and Decision-Making in the Department of Energy-Office of Science and Technology. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Sidney Gauthreaux, Jr., is a Professor of Biological Sciences at Clemson University where he has worked for the last 35 years. His area of expertise is in laboratory and field studies of bird migration, orientation, and navigation. He is one of the pioneers in the use of radar to study bird movements in the atmosphere, and he has been particularly interested in bird migration

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Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects across the Gulf of Mexico and over the eastern United States. Currently, the Department of the Interior and the Nature Conservancy are using information gathered by Dr. Gauthreaux on important migration stopover areas in an effort to evaluate these areas for habitat protection projects. He is a fellow of several societies including the American Ornithologists Union, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Deutsche Ornithologen-Gesellschaft. Dr. Gauthreaux has served as President of the Animal Behavior Society and Chair of the South Carolina Heritage Trust Advisory Board. He received his Ph.D. in Ornithology from Louisiana State University. Sherri W. Goodman is General Counsel at the Center for Naval Analyses Corporation, a non-profit research and analysis organization. Ms. Goodman was the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Environmental Security) from 1993 to 2001. As the chief environmental, safety, and occupational-health officer for the Department of Defense, Ms. Goodman was responsible for programs including energy efficiency and climate change, cleanup at active and closing bases, compliance with environmental laws, environmental cooperation with foreign militaries, conservation of natural and cultural resources, explosives safety, and pest management. Ms. Goodman has twice received the Department of Defense award for Distinguished Public Service, the Gold Medal from the American Defense Preparedness Association, and EPA’s Climate Change Award. She practiced law at the Boston law firm Goodwin Procter. She also served on the staff of the Senate Armed Services Committee, 1987-1990, working for the Chairman, Senator Sam Nunn, where she oversaw the Department of Energy’s Defense and Environmental Programs, including nuclear weapons research and development production, waste management, and environmental remediation. Ms. Goodwin is a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. She received her J.D. from the Harvard School of Law, her Masters in Public Policy from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and her B.A. from Amherst College. John Hayes is Chair of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida. Before coming to the University of Florida he was a Professor in the Department of Forest Science at Oregon State University, where he also served as the Associate Dean of International Programs for the College of Forestry. His research interests include the influence of forest management and habitat alteration on wildlife populations, the influence of spatial scale on habitat selection, and the ecology and management of bats. Currently, he is co-investigator on a research project exploring approaches to evaluate risk of wind-energy sites to bats. In addition, Dr. Hayes has served as a member of a scientific advisory committee

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Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects for a research cooperative focused on implications of wind energy on bats, and he has served as a consultant in assessing risks of proposed wind-energy sites for bats. Dr. Hayes received his Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Cornell University. Arpad Horvath is an Associate Professor in the Engineering and Project Management Program in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests are in developing methods and tools for environmental and economic analysis of civil infrastructure systems, primarily for the built environment. His research has focused on the environmental implications of the construction, electronics and various service industries, life-cycle assessment modeling by using environmentally augmented economic input-output analysis, and environmental performance measurement. He is the director of the Consortium on Green Design and Manufacturing, which encourages multidisciplinary research and education on environment and pollution prevention issues. He is also associate editor of the Journal of Infrastructure Systems. He received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. Thomas H. Kunz is Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology at Boston University, where he has been on the faculty for the past 34 years. His research focuses on the ecology, behavior, evolution, and conservation biology of bats. He is the author or co-author of over 200 publications and is the editor of Ecology of Bats (Plenum Press 1982) and Ecological and Behavioral Methods for the Study of Bats (Smithsonian Institution Press 1988), and co-editor of Bat Biology and Conservation (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1998), Bat Ecology (University of Chicago Press 2003), and Functional and Evolutionary Ecology of Bats (Oxford University Press, et al. 2006). He is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Past-President of the American Society of Mammalogists, and a recipient of the Gerrit S. Miller Jr. Award (1984) and the C. Hart Merriam Award (2000). He is currently funded by grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Park Service, where his research focuses on assessing the ecological and economic impact of Brazilian free-tailed bats on agroecosystems and the influence of anthropogenic factors on the prevalence of rabies in two common species of North American insectivorous bats. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. Lynn Maguire is Professor of the Practice of Environmental Decision Analysis and Director of Professional Studies at the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke University, where she has been since 1982. Dr. Maguire’s current research uses a combination of methods from

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Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects decision analysis, environmental conflict resolution, and social psychology to study environmental decision making. Dr. Maguire focuses on collaborative decision processes where values important to the general public and stakeholders must be combined with technical analysis to determine management strategies. She has applied these methods to management of endangered species, invasive species, multiple use of public forestland, and water quality planning. She was on the editorial board of the journal Biological Conservation, and she was also was a member of the board of Governors of the Society of Conservation Biology. She has served as a member on the NRC Committee on Scientific Issues in the Endangered Species Act and on the NRC Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River review committee. She received a Ph.D. in Wildlife Ecology from Utah State University. Lance Manuel is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. His areas of interest are structural reliability, structural dynamics, probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, and wind engineering. He has worked with Sandia National Laboratories on the statistical analysis of inflow and loads data for wind turbines, on characterization of the spatial coherence in inflow turbulence for wind turbines, and on the development of turbine design loads using inverse reliability techniques. He received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Stanford University. Erik Lundtang Petersen is the Head of the Wind Energy Department at Risø National Laboratory in Roskilde, Denmark. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities for industry and society in the exploitation of wind power and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. He has worked with the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Programme, and was principal consultant for the World Meteorological Organization on the Meteorological Information for Development of Renewable Energy project. He is the editor of the journal Wind Energy and is a member and founding member of the European Renewable Energy Centres Agency. He has served on a variety of missions for the United Nations Development Program and Danida in the capacity as advisor for wind-energy feasibility projects and was advisor to the Algerian Commissariel National aux Energies Nouvelles. He received his Ph.D. from the Technical University of Denmark. Dale Strickland is Vice President and Senior Ecologist at Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc. (WEST). His areas of expertise include the design and conduct of wildlife studies, impact and risk assessment, and natural resource damage assessment studies. Prior to his employment with WEST he served as a scientist and administrator with the Wyoming Game and Fish

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Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects Department and served on the faculty of the Department of Statistics at the University of Wyoming. He has also taught courses in wildlife management and statistics as a visiting instructor at the University of Wyoming. He contributed to documents for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for the quantification of injury due to oil spills in Type B Natural Resource Damage Assessments. He authored a chapter in a guidance document on the conduct of research on interactions between birds and wind-energy facilities for the National Wind Coordinating Committee. Dr. Strickland is currently serving as the Executive Director of the Platte River Endangered Species Partnership. He is also currently serving as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Wildlife Management. Dr. Strickland received a Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Wyoming. Jean Vissering is a landscape architect who has presented and written extensively on the issues of scenic resource evaluation and visual impact assessment and aesthetics within Vermont. Ms. Vissering has worked with wind-energy developers, local communities, and other stakeholders in assessing the impacts of wind-energy projects in Vermont. She has presented at the National Wind Coordinating Committee, and has written a paper for the State of Vermont on the subject of visual aesthetics and wind-energy projects. Ms. Vissering has been a Lecturer at the University of Vermont’s School of Natural Resources and Department of Plant and Soil Science. She received a Masters of Landscape Architecture from North Carolina State University. James Roderick (Rick) Webb is a Senior Scientist with the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia, where he is Projects Coordinator of the Shenandoah Watershed Study and the Virginia Trout Stream Sensitivity Study. His primary research focus is the effects of air pollution on streams associated with forested mountain watersheds in the central Appalachian Mountain region. He has served on several cases as an expert witness on aquatic effects of acidic deposition for the U.S. Department of Justice. Previously, he worked with conservation organizations concerned with the direct environmental effects of coal extraction. He represented the Virginia Society of Ornithology on the Virginia Wind Energy Collaborative Environmental Working Group and co-authored a document on land-based wind-energy projects and environmental effects. He received a Masters in Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia. Robert Whitmore is a Professor of Wildlife Ecology at West Virginia University where he has been since 1975. His research interests are in conservation ecology, ornithology, interpretive bird studies, and quantitative ecology. He has performed field work and published on birds and bats in the area of

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Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects the Alleghany Highlands where wind-energy projects are being developed. Within the Appalachian ecosystems, Dr. Whitmore has conducted extensive field research in the habitat types that are involved in wind-energy development. He is an Elected Member of the American Ornithologists Union, as well as a member of the Cooper Ornithological Society, the Wilson Ornithological Society, and the Society of Field Ornithologists. He received a Ph.D. in Zoology from Brigham Young University.