Click for next page ( 51


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 50
B Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMbERS William L. Scherlis, Chair, is a full professor in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon. He is the founding director of CMU’s doc- toral program in software engineering and director of its International Software Research Institute. His research relates to software assurance, software evolution, and technology to support software teams. Dr. Scher- lis joined the CMU faculty after completing a Ph.D. in computer science at Stanford University, a year at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland) as a John Knox Fellow, and an A.B. at Harvard University. He was the lead principal investigator of the 4-year High Dependability Comput- ing Project, in which CMU leads a collaboration with five universities to help NASA address long-term software dependability challenges. He is also co-PI (with two colleagues) of a new project with NASA and diverse industry and laboratory subcontractors focused on dependable real-time and embedded software systems. Dr. Scherlis is involved in a number of activities related to technology and policy, recently testifying before Congress on innovation and information technology and, previously, on roles for a federal chief information officer. He interrupted his career at CMU to serve at DARPA for 6 years, departing in 1993 as senior executive responsible for coordination of software research. While at DARPA he had responsibility for research and strategy in computer security, aspects of high-performance computing, information infrastructure, and other topics. Dr. Scherlis is a member of the NRC’s Committee on Improving Cybersecurity Research in the United States and the DARPA Information 0

OCR for page 50
 APPENDIX B Science and Technology Study Group. He recently finished chairing a NRC study on information technology, innovation, and e-government. He has led or participated in national studies related to cybersecurity, crisis response, analyst information management, DoD software management, and health care informatics infrastructure. He has been an advisor to major IT companies. He served as program chair for a number of techni- cal conferences, including the ACM Foundations of Software Engineering Symposium. He has more than 70 scientific publications. Robert F. behler is a senior vice president in the MITRE Corporation Command and Control Center for programs and advanced command and control. The center serves MITRE’s DoD sponsors and focuses on creating a joint command, control, and communications system. Mr. Behler leads the center’s work for DoD sponsors. Before joining MITRE in April 2006, Mr. Behler was general manager of Precision Engagement at Johns Hop- kins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory. In this position he super- vised over 250 scientists and engineers working on advanced command, control, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C2ISR) programs for the DoD. Under Mr. Behler’s leadership, the Precision Engagement organization turned new and emerging technologies into transformational operational capabilities. Mr. Behler retired from the Air Force as a major general in 2003. During his distinguished 31-year career, he accumulated extensive experience managing and developing advanced command, con- trol, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and recon- naissance (C4ISR) technologies at all levels. Before retiring, Mr. Behler was commander of the Air Force C2ISR Center at Langley Air Force Base, where he was principal C2ISR advisor to the secretary and chief of staff of the Air Force. Prior to that, he served as deputy commander of NATO Joint Headquarters North in Stavanger, Norway, and was the senior U.S. military officer in Scandinavia. He has also served as director of com- mand, control, communication, computers, and intelligence at the U.S. Strategic Command at Offutt Air Force Base and as chief of the U.S. Air Force-Senate Liaison Office. Mr. Behler entered the Air Force in 1972 as a distinguished graduate of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program at the University of Oklahoma. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in aerospace engineering from the University of Okla- homa in 1970 and 1972, respectively. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base and has accumulated over 5,000 flying hours in more than 65 aircraft types, including the SR-71 and U-2. He was a National Security Fellow at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government in 1990 and received a master’s degree in business administration from Marymount University in 1991. He is an

OCR for page 50
 SOFTWARE-INTENSIVE SYSTEMS AND UNCERTAINTY AT SCALE associate fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots and a member of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association. barry W. boehm, NAE, is TRW Professor of Software Engineering and Director, Center for Software Engineering, at the University of Southern California. Dr. Boehm received his B.A. degree from Harvard University in 1957, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from University of California, Los Angeles, in 1961 and 1964, all in mathematics. He also received an honorary Sc.D. in computer science from the University of Massachusetts in 2000. Between 1989 and 1992, he served at the DoD as director of the DARPA Information Science and Technology Office, and as director of the DDR&E Software and Computer Technology Office. He worked at TRW from 1973 to 1989, culminating as chief scientist of the Defense Systems Group, and at the Rand Corporation from 1959 to 1973, culminating as head of the Information Sciences Department. He was a programmer- analyst at General Dynamics between 1955 and 1959. His current research interest focus on value-based software engineering, including a method for integrating a software system’s process models, product models, prop- erty models, and success models called Model-Based (System) Architect- ing and Software Engineering (MBASE). His contributions to the field include the Constructive Cost Model (COCOMO), the Spiral Model of the software process, the Theory W (win-win) approach to software man- agement and requirements determination, the foundations for the areas of software risk management and software quality factor analysis, and two advanced software engineering environments: the TRW Software Productivity System and Quantum Leap Environment. He has served on the boards of several scientific journals, including the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, IEEE Computer, IEEE Software, ACM Computing Reiews, Automated Software Engineering, Software Process, and Information and Software Technology. He has served as chair of the AIAA Technical Committee on Computer Systems, chair of IEEE Technical Committee on Software Engineering, and as a member of the Governing Board of the IEEE Computer Society. He has served as chair of the Air Force Scien- tific Advisory Board’s Information Technology Panel, chair of the NASA Research and Technology Advisory Committee for Guidance, Control, and Information Processing, and chair of the board of visitors for the CMU Software Engineering Institute. Lori A. Clarke is a professor of computer science at the University of Mas- sachusetts, Amherst. She is an ACM Fellow, vice chair of the Computing Research Association’s board of directors, and a member of the CRA-W. She is a former IEEE distinguished visitor, ACM national lecturer, IEEE publication board member, associate editor of ACM TOPLAS and IEEE

OCR for page 50
 APPENDIX B TSE, member of the CCR NSF advisory board, ACM SIGSOFT secretary/ treasurer, vice-chair and chair, as well as a 1990 recipient of the University of Massachusetts’ Chancellor’s Medal, and a 1993 recipient of a university faculty fellowship. Dr. Clarke has worked in the area of software engi- neering, particularly on software analysis and testing, for many years. She was one of the primary developers of symbolic execution, a technique used to reason about the behavior of software systems and for select- ing test data, and made contributions in the areas of software architec- ture and object management. Recently her work has focused on analysis of concurrent systems. With colleagues, she has developed FLAVERS, a static analysis tool that uses data-flow analysis techniques to verify user-specified properties. FLAVERS automatically creates a concise, but perhaps imprecise, model of the software system and then allows users to selectively improve the accuracy of the program model as needed to improve the accuracy of the results. The PROPEL system complements FLAVERS and other event-based, finite-state verification systems by help- ing users elucidate the details of the properties to be proven. FLAVERS allows users to simultaneously view and construct properties from tem- plates of English-language phrases or finite-state automata. The long-term goal is to develop techniques that well-trained software engineers can use to improve the quality of software systems. She received her B.A. in mathematics (1969) from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. in computer science (1976) from the University of Colorado. Michael A. Cusumano is the Sloan Management Reiew’s distinguished professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management. He specializes in strategy, product development, and entre- preneurship in the computer software industry, as well as automobiles and consumer electronics. He teaches courses on strategic management, innovation and entrepreneurship, and the software business. He has con- sulted for some 50 major companies around the world. He has been a director of NuMega Technologies (sold to Compuware in 1998 for $150 million) and Infinium Software (sold to SSA Global Technologies in 2002 for $105 million), as well as other private and public software companies. He is currently a director of Patni Computer Systems (software outsourc- ing based in India) and Entigo (warrantee management software) and an advisor to NetNumina Solutions (Internet architecture and custom solu- tions), firstRain (wireless and Web services software), H-5 Technologies (digital search technology), and Sigma Technology Group PLC (early- stage ventures). He has also served as editor-in-chief and chairman of the MIT Sloan Management Reiew and writes periodically for Communications of the ACM, The Wall Street Journal, Computerworld, The Washington Post, and other publications. Dr. Cusumano has published eight books. His

OCR for page 50
 SOFTWARE-INTENSIVE SYSTEMS AND UNCERTAINTY AT SCALE latest book, The Business of Software: What Eery Manager, Programmer, and Entrepreneur Must Know to Thrie and Surie in Good Times and Bad, was published in March 2004. Dr. Cusumano received a B.A. degree from Princeton in 1976 and a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1984. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in production and operations management at the Harvard Business School from 1984 to 1986. He is fluent in Japanese and lived and worked in Japan for 7 years. He received two Fulbright fellowships and a Japan Foundation Fellowship for studying at Tokyo University. Mary Ann Davidson is the chief security officer at Oracle Corporation, responsible for security evaluations, assessments, and incident handling. As a senior executive in the IT industry she brings both a military and a business background and in-depth experience with and perspective on industrial capacity to respond to Defense needs. She represents Oracle on the board of directors of the Information Technology Information Secu- rity Analysis Center (IT-ISAC) and is on the editorial review board of the Secure Business Quarterly. Ms. Davidson has a B.S.M.E. from the University of Virginia and an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She has also served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps, where she was awarded the Navy Achieve- ment Medal. Larry Druffel recently retired as president and CEO of SCRA, a public, nonprofit research and development corporation engaged in the applica- tion of advanced technology. He is a member of the board of directors of Teknowledge Corporation and a member of the advisory board of Amaix Corporation. He was the director of the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at Carnegie Mellon from 1986 to 1996, where he initiated the Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) in 1987. Before joining SEI, he was vice president for business development at Rational Software. He served on the board of directors of Rational from 1986 to 1995. Dr. Druffel was on the faculty at the U.S. Air Force Academy. He later man- aged research programs in advanced software technology at DARPA. He was founding director of the Ada Joint Program Office and then served as director of Computer Systems and Software (research and advanced technology) in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He is the coauthor of a computer science textbook and over 35 professional papers, includ- ing the chapter “Information Warfare” for the ACM fiftieth anniversary book Beyond Computing. He has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois, an M.Sc. in computer science from the University of London, and a Ph.D. in computer science from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Druffel is a fellow of the IEEE and a fellow of the ACM. He has served on

OCR for page 50
 APPENDIX B engineering advisory boards of the University of South Carolina, Clem- son, and Embry Riddle University. He was chairman of the board of direc- tors of the Advanced Technology Institute, a nonprofit R&D corporation. Dr. Druffel chaired the Air Force Science Advisory Board (AFSAB) study on information architecture and co-chaired the Defense Science Board’s study on acquiring defense software commercially. He led the Defensive Information Warfare Panel for the AFSAB’s New World Vistas. He has served on numerous AFSAB, DSB, and NRC committees dealing with the use of information technology, including the NRC study on engineering challenges to the long term operation of the International Space Station. Russell Frew is the vice president, programs and technology, for Lock- heed Martin’s Electronic Systems Business Area (ESBA). In this capacity he is responsible for overseeing both technology development and pro- gram performance in the business sector. He is frequently called upon to lead engineering assistance teams that engage major programs across the corporation struggling with significant technical and programmatic issues. In his capacity as the ESBA chief technical officer, he is also respon- sible for the technology strategy and the investment plan. Additionally, Mr. Frew has executive responsibility for the Advanced Technology Labo- ratories in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. From 1999 to late 2003, Mr. Frew was on special assignment from the MS2 staff to the executive vice president, ESBA. In this capacity he has led major program tiger teams working on F/A-22 avionics stability, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter’s Mission System redesign, and the F-16 Block 60 Advanced Mission Computer. As part of the COTS revolution, Mr. Frew authored and leads the Lockheed Mar- tin Proven Path electronics program. Prior to his appointment as vice president advanced technology for MS2 in 1999, he spent 18 months as vice president, technology, for Government Electronics Systems (GES) in Moorestown, New Jersey. While with GES he managed leap-ahead technology programs such as COMBATS and InfoScene. From June 1996 to March 1997, Mr. Frew was executive director of the Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL). During his tenure, Mr. Frew conceived and led a 9-month study for DARPA on collaborative intelligent software agents. Before that, Mr. Frew managed ATL’s artificial intel- ligence lab for 8 years and served as a career military officer. The Army later loaned him to DARPA, where he was one of the original members of the strategic computing program that defeated Japan’s Fifth Generation challenge. Mr. Frew is on the board of directors of the ISX Corporation. James Larus is a research area manager at Microsoft Research. He man- ages several groups: Advanced Compiler Technology, studying com- piler and language implement techniques and focused on techniques

OCR for page 50
56 SOFTWARE-INTENSIVE SYSTEMS AND UNCERTAINTY AT SCALE for implementing modern, safe language and in compiling for highly parallel hardware; Human Interaction in Programming, which uses HCI techniques such as controlled user studies and ethnography to study software developers, testers, managers, and their teams to produce inno- vative software development tools that address human and social issues; Runtime Analysis and Design, which uses runtime program analysis, including hybrid static-dynamic analysis, statistical sampling, and heap analysis to improve software quality, security, and performance; Software Reliability Research, which applies program verification techniques and software measurement and modeling techniques to improve the quality of software; and Concurrency Research, which will explore ways to improve parallel programming. His research centers on Singularity, a project to focus on the construction of reliable systems through innovation in the areas of systems, languages, and tools: What would a software platform look like if it was designed from scratch with the primary goal of depend- ability? Singularity is working to answer this question by building on advances in programming languages and tools to develop a new system architecture and operating system (named Singularity), with the aim of producing a more robust and dependable software platform. Prior to joining Microsoft, Dr. Larus was an associate professor in the Computer Sciences Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has an M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California at Berkeley and an A.B. in applied mathematics from Harvard University. Greg Morrisett is Allen B. Cutting Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University. His current research interest is in the application of programming language technology for building secure and reliable s ystems. In particular, he is interested in applications of advanced type sys- tems, model checkers, certifying compilers, proof-carrying code, and inline reference monitors for building efficient and provably secure systems. He is also interested in the design and application of high-level languages for new or emerging domains, such as sensor networks. Dr. Morrisett received his B.S. in mathematics and computer science from the University of Richmond (1989) and his Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mel- lon University (1995). He spent about 7 years on the faculty of the Com- puter Science Department at Cornell University. In the 2002-2003 academic year, he took a sabbatical at Microsoft’s Cambridge Research Laboratory. In January of 2004, he moved to Harvard University. Walker Royce is the vice president of IBM’s Worldwide Rational Lab Services. Mr. Royce joined Rational in 1994 and served as vice president of professional services from 1997 through IBM’s acquisition of Rational in 2003. Over the last 10 years, he has managed large software engineer-

OCR for page 50
 APPENDIX B ing projects, consulted with a broad spectrum of Rational’s worldwide customer base, and developed a software management approach that exploits an iterative life cycle, industry best practices, and architecture- first priorities. He is the author of Software Project Management, A Unified Framework (Addison Wesley Longman, 1998) and a principal contributor to the management philosophy inherent in Rational’s Unified Process. Before joining Rational, Mr. Royce spent 16 years in software project development, software technology development, and software manage- ment roles at TRW Electronics & Defense. He was a recipient of TRW’s Chairman’s Award for Innovation for his contributions in distributed architecture middleware and iterative software processes in 1990 and was named a TRW Technical Fellow in 1992. He received his B.A. in physics from the University of California and his M.S. in computer information and control engineering from the University of Michigan. Douglas C. Schmidt is a professor of computer science and associate chair of the computer science and engineering program at Vanderbilt Univer- sity. He has published over 300 technical papers and six books that cover a range of research topics, including patterns, optimization techniques, and empirical analyses of software frameworks and domain-specific modeling environments that facilitate the development of distributed real-time and embedded (DRE) middleware and applications running over high-speed networks and embedded system interconnects. Dr. Schmidt has served as a deputy office director and a program manager at DARPA, where he led the national R&D effort on middleware for DRE systems. Dr. Schmidt has also served as the co-chair for the Software Design and Productivity Coordinating Group of the U.S. government’s multiagency Information Technology Research and Development Program, which formulated the multiagency research agenda in software design. In addition to his aca- demic research and government service, Dr. Schmidt has over 15 years of experience leading the development of ACE, TAO, CIAO, and CoSMIC, which are widely used, open-source DRE middleware frameworks and model-driven tools that contain a rich set of components and domain- specific languages that implement patterns and product-line architectures for high-performance DRE systems. John P. Stenbit, NAE, is an independent consultant. He recently served as assistant secretary of defense for networks and information integration and as DoD’s chief information officer. Mr. Stenbit’s career spans more than 30 years of public and private-sector service in telecommunications and command and control. In addition to his recent service, his public service includes 2 years as principal deputy director of telecommunica- tions and command and control systems, and 2 years as staff specialist

OCR for page 50
 SOFTWARE-INTENSIVE SYSTEMS AND UNCERTAINTY AT SCALE for worldwide command and control systems, both in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Mr. Stenbit previously was executive vice president at TRW, retiring in May 2001. He joined TRW in 1968 and was responsible for the planning and analysis of advanced satellite surveillance systems. Prior to joining TRW, he held a position with the Aerospace Corpora- tion involving command-and-control systems for missiles and satellites, and satellite data compression and pattern recognition. During this time, he was a Fulbright Fellow and Aerospace Corporation Fellow at the Technische Hogeschool, Einhoven, Netherlands, concentrating on cod- ing theory and data compression. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including as chair of the Science and Technology Advisory Panel to the director of central intelligence and as a member of the Science Advisory Group to the Directors of Naval Intel- ligence and the Defense Communications Agency. Kevin J. Sullivan is associate professor and Virginia Engineering Founda- tion (VEF) endowed faculty fellow in computer science at the University of Virginia, where he has worked since 1994. His research interests are mainly in software engineering and languages. He has served as associ- ate editor for the Journal of Empirical Software Engineering and the ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology, and on the program and executive committees of conferences, including the ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, the Interna- tional Conference on Software Engineering, Aspect-Oriented Software Development, and ACM SIGPLAN-SIGACT Symposium on Principles of Programming Languages. He and his students are broadly interested in the design and engineering of software-intensive systems, with an emphasis on the need for a value-based theory and practice of system design. Dr. Sullivan received his undergraduate degree from Tufts Univer- sity in 1987 and the M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science and engineering from the University of Washington in 1994. CSTb STAFF Lynette I. Millett is a senior program officer and study director at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Acad- emies. She is currently involved in several CSTB projects, including a comprehensive exploration of biometrics systems, a study of emerging challenges to sustaining computing performance growth, and an exami- nation of the Social Security Administration’s electronic services strategy. Her portfolio includes significant portions of CSTB’s recent work on soft- ware and on identity systems and privacy. She recently completed the study that produced Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Eidence? and she was the study director for the project that produced the reports

OCR for page 50
 APPENDIX B Who Goes There? Authentication Through the Lens of Priacy and IDs—Not That Easy: Questions About Nationwide Identity Systems. She has an M.Sc. in computer science from Cornell University, along with a B.A. in mathemat- ics and computer science with honors from Colby College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Joan D. Winston is a program officer for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. She is currently involved in CSTB projects assessing e-government strategy, the produc- ibility of software-intensive systems, and the information technology R&D ecosystem. Before CSTB, she was an assistant director (Information Technology Team) at the Government Accountability Office. From 1998 to 2001, she was principal associate at Steve Walker and Associates, LLC, which managed early-stage venture funds focusing on information tech- nology. From 1995 to 1998, she was director of policy analysis for Trusted Information Systems, Inc. From 1986 to 1995, she held various analytical and project direction positions at the Congressional Office of Technol- ogy Assessment (OTA) and was named an OTA senior associate in 1993. Before OTA, she worked briefly for the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress. Ms. Winston started her career as an engineer at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She received an S.B. in physics and an S.M. in technology and policy, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Margaret Marsh Huynh, senior program assistant, has been with CSTB since January 1999 supporting several projects. She is currently support- ing the projects currently titled Whither Biometrics, Wireless Technology Prospects and Policy, Adancing Software-Intensie Systems Producibility, and Assessing the Impacts of Changes in the Information Technology Research and Deelopment Ecosystem. She previously worked on the projects that produced the reports Signposts in Cyberspace: The Domain Name Systems and Internet Naigation; Getting Up to Speed: The Future of Supercomput- ing; Beyond Productiity: Information Technology, Innoation, and Creatiity; IT Roadmap to a Geospatial Future; Building a Workforce for the Information Economy; and The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age. Ms. Huynh also assisted with the NTIA workshop on improving spectrum management through economic and other incentives (2006), the GAO/NRC forum on information resource management and the paper- work reduction act (2005), as well as the workshops on IT issues for the behavioral and social sciences. Prior to coming to the NRC, Ms. Huynh worked as a meeting assistant at Management for Meetings, April 1998- August 1998, and as a meeting assistant at the American Society for Civil Engineers from September 1996 to April 1998. Ms. Huynh has a B.A. (1990) in liberal studies with minors in sociology and psychology from Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.