D
Biographies of Committee Members

Mildred S. Dresselhaus, Co-Chair

Mildred Dresselhaus is Institute Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her recent research interests range broadly over condensed-matter and materials physics, with a particular focus on carbon science, nanoscience, and their intersection as well as the role of nanoscience in energy-related research. Dr. Dresselhaus is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the American Philosophical Society and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society (APS), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Materials Research Society, the Society of Women Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She has served as president of the APS, treasurer of the National Academy of Sciences, president of the AAAS, and as a member of numerous advisory committees and councils. She served as the director of the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy in 2000-2001. She was elected foreign fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, India, in 2006. She is now chair of the governing board of the American Institute of Physics. Dr. Dresselhaus has received numerous awards, including the National Medal of Science and 22 honorary doctorates. She is the coauthor of four books on carbon science.


William J. Spencer, Co-Chair

William Spencer is chairman emeritus of the International SEMATECH Board. He served as chairman of the SEMATECH and International SEMATECH boards



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D Biographies of Committee Members Mildred S. Dresselhaus, Co-Chair Mildred Dresselhaus is Institute Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her recent research interests range broadly over condensed-matter and materials physics, with a particular focus on carbon science, nanoscience, and their intersection as well as the role of nano- science in energy-related research. Dr. Dresselhaus is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the American Philosophical Society and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society (APS), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Materials Research Society, the Society of Women Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She has served as president of the APS, treasurer of the National Academy of Sciences, president of the AAAS, and as a member of numerous advisory committees and councils. She served as the director of the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy in 2000-2001. She was elected foreign fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, India, in 2006. She is now chair of the governing board of the American Institute of Physics. Dr. Dresselhaus has received numerous awards, including the National Medal of Science and 22 honorary doctorates. She is the coauthor of four books on carbon science. William J. Spencer, Co-Chair William Spencer is chairman emeritus of the International SEMATECH Board. He served as chairman of the SEMATECH and International SEMATECH boards 

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c o n d e n s e d - m at t e r m at e r i a l s P h ys i c s  and and president and chief executive officer of SEMATECH. Dr. Spencer has held key research positions at Xerox Corporation, Bell Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories. He received the Regents Meritorious Service Medal from the Univer- sity of New Mexico in 1981; the C.B. Sawyer Award for contribution to “The Theory and Development of Piezoelectric Devices” in 1972; and a citation for achievement from William Jewell College in 1969, where he also received a doctor of science degree in 1990. Dr. Spencer is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of IEEE, and he serves on numerous advisory groups and boards. He was the Regents Professor at the University of California in the spring of 1998. He has been a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley, School of En- gineering and the Haas School of Business since the fall of 1998. He is a research professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Spencer received an A.B. degree from William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, and an M.S. degree in mathematics and a Ph.D. in physics from Kansas State University. gabriel Aeppli Gabriel Aeppli is the Quain Professor of Physics at University College London and the director of the London Centre for Nanotechnology. Prior to taking up these posts in the fall of 2002, he was a senior research scientist for NEC Labs America and a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at Bell Laboratories. He obtained a B.Sc. in mathematics and Ph.D., M.Sc., and B.Sc. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His main research interests are quantum information processing, nanotechnology (including especially its manifestations in the life sciences), and particle and x-ray beam-based probes of condensed matter. Dr. Aeppli’s honors include the 2005 Buckley Prize of the APS, 2003 International Union of Pure and Applied Physics Magnetism Prize/Neel Medal, 2002 Royal Soci- ety Wolfson Research Merit Award, and the 2002 Mildner Lecturer, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London. He is a fellow of Riso National Laboratory, the American Physical Society, and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. In addition, he has been a member and chair of many panels, sponsored by the Department of Energy, American Physical Society, and the National Research Council, among others. Samuel D. Bader Samuel Bader is an Argonne Distinguished Fellow and serves as group leader for magnetic films and an associate director of Argonne National Laboratory’s Materi- als Science Division, and as chief scientist for the Center for Nanoscale Materials. Dr. Bader received his B.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Califor- nia, Berkeley. His current research interests include employing nanotechnology to create novel permanent magnets and exploring laterally confined nanomagnets in order to develop magnetic electronics and bio-inspired, self-assembled magnetic

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aPPendix d  nanostructures. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the Ameri- can Vacuum Society. His honors include the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Award for Outstanding Achievement in Solid State Physics, the University of Chicago Award for Distinguished Performance at Argonne, the AVS John A. Thornton Memorial Award, and the APS David Adler Lectureship Award. He is an adjunct professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Northwestern University, and a senior fellow of the University of Chicago- Argonne Consortium for Nanoscience Research. He chaired the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Labora- tory and serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network. William Bialek William Bialek is the John Archibald Wheeler/Battelle Professor in Physics at Princeton University. He also is an associated faculty member in the Department of Molecular Biology and a member of the multidisciplinary Lewis–Sigler Institute. He attended the University of California, Berkeley, receiving the A.B. (1979) and Ph.D. (1983) degrees in biophysics. Dr. Bialek’s research interests have ranged from the dynamics of individual biological molecules to learning and cognition. Best known for contributions to the understanding of coding and computation in the brain, Dr. Bialek and collaborators have shown that aspects of brain function can be described as essentially optimal strategies for adapting to the complex dynamics of the world, making the most of the available signals in the face of fundamental physical constraints and limitations. He is a fellow of the American Physical Soci- ety and was a Presidential Young Investigator and Miller Research Fellow and Re- gents’ Junior Faculty Fellow. He recently completed a term as chair of the advisory board for the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, and he recently received the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Princeton. David J. Bishop David Bishop is the chief technology officer and chief operating officer of LGS, the wholly owned subsidiary of Alcatel-Lucent dedicated to serving the U.S. fed- eral government market. Most recently he was president of government research and security solutions for Bell Laboratories/Lucent Technologies. Dr. Bishop was a Bell Laboratories Fellow, and in his previous positions with Lucent, he served as nanotechnology research vice president for Bell Laboratories/Lucent Technolo- gies, president of the New Jersey Nanotechnology Consortium, and the physical sciences research vice president. In 1988 he was made a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff, and later that same year was promoted to department head, Bell Laboratories. Dr. Bishop joined AT&T Bell Laboratories in 1978 as a postdoctoral

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c o n d e n s e d - m at t e r m at e r i a l s P h ys i c s  and member of the staff and in 1979 became a member of the technical staff. He gradu- ated magna cum laude with honors from Syracuse University in 1973 with a B.S. in physics. In 1977 he received an M.S. in physics from Cornell University and in 1978 a Ph.D. in physics from Cornell. Anthony K. Cheetham Anthony Cheetham is a professor of solid state chemistry, materials, and chemistry and director of the International Center for Materials Research at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He received his B.A. in 1969 from St. Catherine’s College in Oxford, U.K., and his M.A. and D.Phil. from Wadham College, also in Oxford. His research interests include nanoporous and open-framework materials, novel phosphors for solid-state lighting, magnetic properties of mixed metal man- ganates, and new methods for materials characterization. His honors include a 1977 Fulbright Scholarship (Arizona State University), and 1982 Corday-Morgan Medal, 1988 Solid State Chemistry Award, and 1996 Structural Chemistry Award, all from the Royal Society of Chemistry, London, as well as the 2003 Professor C.N.R. Rao Lecture Award from the Chemical Research Society of India, 2003 Humphry Davy Prize Lectureship of the Royal Society, and the 2004 Somiya Award of the Interna- tional Union of Materials Research Societies (with Professor C.N.R. Rao). He is a fellow of the Royal Society, London; associate fellow of the Third World Academy of Sciences; and honorary fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Dr. Cheetham is a member of the European Academy of Arts, Sciences and Humanities and a for- eign member of both the Pakistan Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences of India. He has served on advisory and planning committees for the Spallation Neutron Source, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and Argonne, Brookhaven, Oak Ridge, and Los Alamos National Laboratories. James P. Eisenstein James Eisenstein is the Frank J. Roshek Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and is an expert in low-dimen- sional condensed-matter physics. His research focuses on experimental studies of correlated electron systems in semiconductors with particular interest in the physics of single- and multi-layer two-dimensional electron systems; his laboratory uncovered several new exotic electron states over the years. He spent a number of years working at Bell Laboratories before going to Caltech. Dr. Eisenstein is a fel- low of the American Physical Society and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He was awarded the 2003 Associated Students of the California Institute of Technology award for excellence in teaching, the 2007 Buckley Prize of the APS, and was a Loeb Lecturer at Harvard University in 2003. He has served on several NRC committees, including National Institute of Standards and Technology review panels, and he is a member of the Solid State Sciences Committee.

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aPPendix d  Hidetoshi Fukuyama Hidetoshi Fukuyama is professor emeritus of Tokyo University and is currently professor of Tokyo University of Science. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in physics from Tokyo University. He was director of the Institute for Solid State Physics, Tokyo University (1999-2003) and director of the International Frontier Center for Advanced Materials (IFCAM) of the Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University (2004-2006). His research interests include theoretical studies of quantum transport phenomena in solids in general, including orbital magnetism, spin-Peierls phenomena, Anderson localization, high-temperature superconductiv- ity, and electronic properties of molecular solids. His honors include the 1987 Japan IBM Science Award, the 1998 Superconductivity Science and Technology Award, and the 2003 National Medal with Purple Ribbon. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society. He served as a vice president of IUPAP (2002-2005) and currently serves on the international advisory committee for J-PARC. Laura garwin Laura Garwin is a postgraduate student in trumpet performance at the Royal Col- lege of Music in London, U.K. Until August 2006 she was executive director of the Bauer Center for Genomics Research at Harvard University, and before that she was the North American editor of Nature. Dr. Garwin received her A.B. in physics from Harvard University, M.A. in geology from the University of Oxford, and Ph.D. in earth sciences from the University of Cambridge. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the British–American Project, a Rhodes Scholar, and editor, with Tim Lincoln, of A Century of Nature: Twenty-One Discoveries That Changed Science and the World. Dr. Garwin served on the American Physical Society’s Pub- lications Oversight Committee and on the steering committee for the American Physical Society’s topical conferences, “Opportunities in Biology for Physicists.” Peter F. green Peter Green is a professor of materials science and engineering and chair of the department at the University of Michigan. He also has appointments in applied physics and macromolecular science. He received his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Cornell University in 1985. Dr. Green was a member of the tech- nical staff at Sandia National Laboratories working on the physical properties of polymers and from 1991 to 1996 he served as the department manager of the Glass and Electronic Ceramics Research Department at Sandia. In 1996 he joined the faculty at the University of Texas, Department of Chemical Engineering, and was appointed the Paul D. and Betty Robertson Meek Centennial Professor in Chemi- cal Engineering in 2000 before moving to the University of Michigan in 2005. Dr. Green’s current research includes studies of polymer blends, block copolymers, thin-film polymer interfaces, polymer melt dynamics, and relaxation processes in

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c o n d e n s e d - m at t e r m at e r i a l s P h ys i c s 0 and organic glasses. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Ceramic Society. He was elected to the Materials Research Society (MRS) board of directors in 2000 and has served on the executive committee of the Polymer Sci- ence Division of the American Chemical Society. He was the 2006 president of the MRS and is as a member-at-large to the Council on Gordon Research Conferences. Dr. Green has served on the external advisory board of the Division of Math and Physical Science at the National Science Foundation. Frances Hellman Frances Hellman is a professor of physics and of materials science and engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and a member of the Materials Science Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She received her B.A. in physics from Dartmouth College in 1978 and her Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University in 1985. Her current research includes the properties of novel magnetic and semiconducting materials especially in thin-film form. Her research group uses specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, and other measurements as a function of temperature in order to test and develop models for materials that challenge our understanding of metallic behavior. She specializes in using Si micro- fabrication techniques to develop calorimeters capable of measuring thin films and tiny crystals, work for which she won the 2006 APS Keithley Instrumentation Prize. In addition, she is interested in the materials science of growing thin films by vapor deposition processes. Dr. Hellman is a fellow of the American Physical Society, past-chair of both the Topical Group on Magnetism and its Applications (GMAG) and the Division of Materials Physics (DMP). She has served on the APS Panel on Public Affairs, the NSF Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee, and the Board on Physics and Astronomy. She also is on the board of the San Francisco Exploratorium and the California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science. Randall g. Hulet Randall Hulet is a professor of physics at Rice University. He received his B.S. in physics from Stanford University and Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Hulet investigates atoms at temperatures of a few nano-kelvin. At such temperatures, the effects of quantum mechanics dominate, greatly alter- ing normal atomic behavior. Dr. Hulet and his group have used laser-cooling and atom-trapping techniques to explore this regime of matter, investigating ultracold atom collisions and quantum statistical effects, such as Bose-Einstein condensation. His honors include the I.I. Rabi Prize from the American Physical Society, a Presi- dential Young Investigators Award, a research fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal. Dr. Hulet is

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aPPendix d  a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Association for the Advance- ment of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Heinrich M. Jaeger Heinrich Jaeger is a professor of physics in the Department of Physics and James Franck Institute at the University of Chicago. He is also director of both the Uni- versity of Chicago Materials Research Science and Engineering Center and the University of Chicago/Argonne Consortium for Nanoscience Research. He received his undergraduate degree in physics from the University of Kiel, Germany, and his M.S. and Ph.D., both in physics, from the University of Minnesota. In his research, he studies the interactions between many, more or less identical “building blocks” that make up larger, complex structures or show collective effects. This includes studies on nonlinear dynamics of (macroscopic) granular materials, self-assembly and transport properties of nanostructures, and vortex dynamics in supercon- ductors. Dr. Jaeger’s honors include the Outstanding Achievement Award from the University of Minnesota, Research Corporation Cottrell Scholarship, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, James Franck Fellowship, and a Fulbright Scholarship. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Steven A. Kivelson Steven Kivelson is a professor of physics at Stanford University and is associate di- rector of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1979. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Penn- sylvania and the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Following that, he was a professor of physics at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, and at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is interested in the qualitative understanding of the macroscopic collective properties, especially equilibrium properties, of condensed-matter systems, and in how these properties arise from the interactions between microscopic degrees of freedom. Recently, his focus has been on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity, the quantum Hall effect, and on conducting phases with novel patterns of broken spatial symmetries in highly correlated electronic fluids. Dr. Kivelson has received an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship, a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Miller Fellowship. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Andrea J. Liu Andrea Liu is a professor of physics in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her B.A. from the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley, and Ph.D. from Cornell University. Dr. Liu is a condensed-matter

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c o n d e n s e d - m at t e r m at e r i a l s P h ys i c s  and theorist who specializes in soft condensed-matter physics. She has done seminal work in several areas, including electrostatic self-assembly and jamming. Dr. Liu’s current research focuses on jamming and on the biophysics of cell crawling. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Paul McEuen Paul McEuen is a professor of physics at Cornell University and principal investiga- tor at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Dr. McEuen received his B.S. in engineering physics from the University of Oklahoma and his Ph.D. in applied physics from Yale University. His research interests are in the science and technol- ogy of nanostructures, particularly carbon-based systems such as nanotubes and C60 molecules; novel fabrication techniques at the nanometer scale; scanned probe microscopy of nanostructures; and assembly and measurement of chemical and biological nanostructures. His honors include Office of Naval Research Young In- vestigator, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow, Packard Foundation Fellow, National Young Investigator, LBNL Outstanding Performance Award, Packard Foundation Interdisciplinary Fellow, and Agilent Technologies Europhysics Prize in Condensed Matter Physics. Dr. McEuen is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Karin M. Rabe Karin Rabe is a professor of physics in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the State University of New Jersey, Rutgers. She received her A.B. in physics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The research in her group currently centers on the theoretical inves- tigation of ferroelectrics and related materials and of magnetic and nonmagnetic martensites. First-principles density-functional methods are used both directly and in the construction of first-principles effective Hamiltonians for theoretical predic- tion and analysis of properties of materials, both real and as-yet hypothetical, in bulk and thin-film forms. Dr. Rabe’s honors include the Arthur Greer Memorial Prize, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, Junior Faculty Fellowship in the Natural Sciences, Presidential Young Investigator, and Clare Boothe Luce Professorship. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Thomas N. Theis Thomas Theis is the director of physical sciences at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. He received a B.S. degree in physics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1972, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Brown University in 1974 and 1978, respectively. A portion of his Ph.D. research was done at the Technical University of Munich, where he completed a postdoctoral year before joining IBM Research in 1979. Dr. Theis joined the Department of Semiconductor Science and Technol- ogy at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center to study electronic properties of two-

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aPPendix d  dimensional systems. Among his many accomplishments, Dr. Theis coordinated the transfer of copper interconnection technology from IBM Research to the IBM Microelectronics Division. The replacement of aluminum chip wiring by copper was an industry first, the biggest change in chip wiring technology in 30 years, and involved close collaboration between research, product development, and manu- facturing organizations. Dr. Theis assumed his current position in February 1998. He is a member of IEEE, the Materials Research Society, a fellow of the American Physical Society, and currently serves on advisory boards for the American Institute of Physics Corporate Associates and the National Nanofabrication Users Network, and the advisory committee for the NIST Advanced Technology Program.

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