E
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE

Lewis R. Goldfrank, M.D., is professor and chair of emergency medicine, New York University School of Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Center. He is the medical director of the New York City Poison Control Center. Dr. Goldfrank served as president of the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine and chaired the American Board of Emergency Medicine’s Subboard on Medical Toxicology. He is senior editor of Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies, a standard text in medical toxicology, the eighth edition of which was published in 2006. Dr. Goldfrank is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and chaired the IOM Committee on Responding to the Psychological Consequences of Terrorism, the IOM Committee for Evaluation of the Metropolitan Medical Response Systems Program, the IOM Committee on Preparing for an Influenza Pandemic: Personal protective equipment for Healthcare Workers. He is currently the Chair of the IOM Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events. His entire career has been spent working in the public hospitals of New York City emphasizing the role of Emergency Medicine in improving access to care, public health, public policy and medical humanism. He is also currently chairing the IOM Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment in the Workplace.


Howard J. Cohen, Ph.D., is a professor and chair of the Occupational Safety and Health Department at the University of New Haven. He formerly was the manager of industrial hygiene at the Olin Corporation and editor in chief of the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA)



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E Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE Lewis R. Goldfrank, M.D., is professor and chair of emergency medi- cine, New York University School of Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Cen- ter. He is the medical director of the New York City Poison Control Center. Dr. Goldfrank served as president of the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine and chaired the American Board of Emergency Medicine’s Subboard on Medical Toxicology. He is senior editor of Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies, a standard text in medical toxi- cology, the eighth edition of which was published in 2006. Dr. Goldfrank is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and chaired the IOM Committee on Responding to the Psychological Consequences of Terror- ism, the IOM Committee for Evaluation of the Metropolitan Medical Response Systems Program, the IOM Committee on Preparing for an Influenza Pandemic: Personal protective equipment for Healthcare Workers. He is currently the Chair of the IOM Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events. His entire career has been spent working in the public hospitals of New York City emphasiz- ing the role of Emergency Medicine in improving access to care, public health, public policy and medical humanism. He is also currently chair- ing the IOM Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment in the Workplace. Howard J. Cohen, Ph.D., is a professor and chair of the Occupational Safety and Health Department at the University of New Haven. He for- merly was the manager of industrial hygiene at the Olin Corporation and editor in chief of the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) 185

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186 PREPARING FOR AN INFLUENZA PANDEMIC Journal. He is a graduate of Boston University where he received a B.A. degree in biology. Dr. Cohen received his master of public health and doctorate of philosophy degrees in industrial health from the University of Michigan. He is certified in the comprehensive practice of industrial hygiene by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. Dr. Cohen is the former chair of the American National Standards Institute Z88.2 commit- tee on respiratory protection and a current member of the editorial board of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. He is the past chair of the AIHA’s respiratory protection committee, a past presi- dent of the Connecticut River Valley Chapter of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, and a past officer and treasurer of the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. Janine C. Jagger, Ph.D., M.P.H., is professor of medicine at the Uni- versity of Virginia School of Medicine. She is founder and director of the International Healthcare Worker Safety Center at the University of Vir- ginia. Dr. Jagger received her master of public health degree from the University of Pittsburgh and her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. Early in her career, her research focused on brain trauma and motor ve- hicle safety. Over the last 15 years, Dr. Jagger has focused on reducing healthcare workers’ risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens. In 1988, she and her colleagues published the landmark study in the New England Journal of Medicine identifying device design as the cause of needlestick injuries and laying out design criteria for reducing risk to users. In 1991, Dr. Jagger developed the EPINet (Exposure Prevention Information Network) surveillance system for healthcare facilities to standardize the tracking of needlestick injuries and blood exposures. EPINet is now used in 50 countries. In 1994, Dr. Jagger founded the International Healthcare Worker Safety Center to propagate the findings from the EPINet research network and to accelerate the transition to safety technology. She was awarded a MacArthur fellowship in 2002 in recognition of this ground- breaking work. Dr. Jagger and her colleagues are the inventors of six patented safety needle devices. Sundaresan Jayaraman, Ph.D., is a professor in the School of Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering and in the College of Management at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia. He and his research students have made significant contributions in enterprise architecture and modeling methodologies for information systems; engineering de- sign of intelligent textile structures and processes; and design and devel-

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187 APPENDIX E opment of knowledge-based systems for textiles and apparel. His group’s research has resulted in the realization of the world’s first Wearable Motherboard™ or Smart Shirt. He is currently engaged in studying the role of management and technology innovation in health care. He re- ceived his Ph.D. degree from North Carolina State University, in 1984, and the M.Tech. and B.Tech. degrees from the University of Madras, India, in 1978 and 1976, respectively. He was involved in the design and development of TK!Solver, the first equation-solving program from Software Arts, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Jayaraman worked as a product manager at Software Arts, Inc., and at Lotus Development Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts, before joining Georgia Tech in the fall of 1985. Professor Jayaraman is a recipient of the 1989 Presiden- tial Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation for his research in the area of computer-aided manufacturing and enterprise architecture. Talmadge E. King, Jr., M.D., is the Constance B. Wofsy Distinguished Professor and vice chairman of the Department of Medicine at the Uni- versity of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, and chief of medical services at San Francisco General Hospital. Dr. King is a gradu- ate of Gustavus Adolphus College and received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, followed by a residency at Emory University, and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of Colorado Health Sci- ences Center, Denver. He held a professorship in medicine at the Univer- sity of Colorado Health Sciences Center and was a senior faculty member at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center. He is a member of the Association of American Physicians, American Clinical and Climatological Association, and Fleischner Society, and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the American College of Chest Physicians. Dr. King is an active member of a number of profes- sional societies and is a past president of the American Thoracic Society. Dr. King’s research focuses on understanding the pathogenesis, diagno- sis, and management of inflammatory lung injury. He has authored nu- merous publications including coauthoring eight books and coediting the recent publication Medical Management of Vulnerable & Underserved Patients: Principles, Practice, Population, a reference work focusing on the treatment of patients living with chronic diseases in poor and minor- ity populations. Dr. King was elected as a member of the IOM of the Na- tional Academy of Sciences in 2004.

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188 PREPARING FOR AN INFLUENZA PANDEMIC Donald Low, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., is head of the Ontario Public Health Laboratory and the Department of Microbiology at the University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. He is a professor at the University of Toronto in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology and the Department of Medicine. A fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Dr. Low completed his undergraduate training and postgraduate training in medicine and infec- tious diseases at the University of Manitoba and his training in Medical Microbiology at the University of Toronto. He is a fellow of the Ameri- can Academy of Microbiology and a member of the Association of American Physicians. Dr. Low’s primary research interests are in the study of the epidemiology and the mechanisms of antimicrobial resis- tance in community and hospital pathogens. Other research interests in- clude the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of streptococcal diseases. Dr. Low has published more than 250 papers in peer-reviewed journals. Sharon Marable, M.D., M.P.H., FACP, has a Clinical Assistant Pro- fessor of Community Health faculty appointment at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. Dr. Marable graduated from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecti- cut, received her medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, and a Master of Public Health degree from Boston University. Dr. Marable also has advanced fellowship training in Com- munity Oriented Primary Care and Primary Health Care Policy. Dr. Marable has worked as a public health physician at the Boston Public Health Commission and the Rhode Island Department of Health, with active society memberships in the American Public Health Association, the National Medical Association, and served as past president of the Rhode Island Public Health Association. In December 2005, Dr. Marable participated in an IOM symposium on Pandemic Influenza Planning for Rhode Island health care leaders. She has also provided input into the State of Rhode Island Pandemic Influenza plan as a representative of the Rhode Island Public Health Association. Over the last 2 years, Dr. Marable has had a major role in educating National Medical Association members about emergency preparedness and pandemic influenza plan- ning, by moderating panel discussions on “Physician Preparedness: The Challenges of Man-made and Natural Disasters—Hurricanes, Weapons of Mass Destruction and Pandemic Flu” and “Disaster Preparedness and

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189 APPENDIX E Medical Response Planning: Are You Ready?” held at the annual Na- tional Medical Association convention. Kent Oestenstad, Ph.D., is currently an associate professor and the di- rector of the Deep South Center for Occupational Health and Safety, a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Educa- tion and Research Center and the Centers for Disease Control and Pre- vention (CDC) National Center for Environmental Health Southeastern Regional Academic Center. He received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Northern Iowa in 1972. He worked as an environmental chemist for 3 years, and then practiced as an industrial hygienist and safety professional at Deere & Company for 12 years. He earned certifi- cation in the comprehensive practice of industrial hygiene in 1976. Dr. Oestenstad enrolled in the environmental health sciences graduate pro- gram at the University of Alabama (UAB) School of Public Health in 1983 and earned an MSPH in 1984 and a Ph.D. in 1988. He has been on the industrial hygiene faculty at UAB since that time. Dr. Oestenstad's research interests include the evaluation of respirator performance, aero- sol behavior and measurement, noise exposure and hearing loss, expo- sure assessment, and occupational safety. Trish M. Perl, M.D., M.Sc., is professor of medicine at the Johns Hop- kins University School of Medicine and in the Department of Epidemiol- ogy at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Perl is also director of hospital epidemiology and infec- tion control and the hospital epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Hospi- tal. She received her medical degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a master of science degree in epidemiology and biostatistics from McGill University. Dr. Perl is a member of the American College of Physicians, American Society of Microbiology, American Federation for Clinical Research, Society of Healthcare Epi- demiology of America, Association of Practitioners of Infection Control, and Infectious Diseases Society of America. She has served as the presi- dent of the Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America. She has served on advisory panels for CDC and served as a consultant to the Na- tional Institutes of Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Her research focuses on the prevention of emerging infections, interventions to prevent healthcare-associated infections, bioterrorism preparedness, preparation for pandemic influenza, and patient and healthcare worker safety.

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190 PREPARING FOR AN INFLUENZA PANDEMIC David Prezant, M.D., is the chief medical officer, Office of Medical Affairs, senior pulmonary consultant, and co-director of the World Trade Center Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program for the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) and is professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and research director for its Pulmonary Division. He received his bachelor of science from Columbia College in 1977 and his doctor of medicine from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1981. Dr. Prezant is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine, and critical care medicine. He is a member of the John P. Redmond, International Association of Fire Fighters Medical Advisory Board and represents FDNY as a member of the technical committee for the Fire Service Joint Labor Management Well- ness/Fitness Initiative. Dr. Prezant is the author of numerous peer- reviewed articles on the health and safety of firefighters, thermal protec- tive equipment to reduce burn injuries and improve exercise performance for firefighters, and recently the effect of World Trade Center exposures on respiratory health of firefighters and emergency medical services personnel. M. E. Bonnie Rogers, Dr.P.H., is an associate professor of nursing and public health and director of the North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Education and Research Center and the Occupational Health Nursing Program at the University of North Carolina, School of Public Health, Chapel Hill. Dr. Rogers received her diploma in nursing from the Washington Hospital Center School of Nursing, Washington, D.C.; her baccalaureate in nursing from George Mason University, School of Nurs- ing, Fairfax, Virginia; and her master of public health degree and doctor- ate in public health from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Rogers was a visiting scholar at the Hast- ing Center in New York and is an ethics consultant. She is certified in occupational health nursing and as a legal nurse consultant. Dr. Rogers is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and the American Asso- ciation of Occupational Health Nurses. Dr. Rogers serves as chairperson of the NIOSH National Occupational Research Agenda Liaison Commit- tee. She has served on numerous Institute of Medicine committees in- cluding the Committee on Nursing, Health, and the Environment and the Committee to Assess Training Needs for Occupational Safety and Health Personnel in the United States. Dr. Rogers is immediate past president of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses.

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191 APPENDIX E STAFF Catharyn T. Liverman, M.L.S., is a senior program officer at the IOM. In her 14 years at IOM, she has worked on studies addressing a range of topics, primarily focused on public health and science policy. Most re- cently she was the study director for the IOM committee that produced the report Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance. Other recent studies include Spinal Cord Injury: Progress, Promise, and Pri- orities; Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions; Gulf War and Health; and Reducing the Burden of Injury. Her background is in medical library science, with previous positions at the National Agricul- tural Library and the Naval War College Library. She received a B.A. from Wake Forest University and an M.L.S. from the University of Maryland. Nora M. Hennessy, M.P.H., is a research associate at the IOM. She earned a B.S. in health resources from George Mason University and an M.P.H. in health promotion and disease prevention from George Wash- ington University. Her previous work experience has included a fellow- ship with the Office on Women’s Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and positions with the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the American Cancer Society. Franklin Branch is a research associate at the IOM. Prior to joining the IOM, he worked for the Adolescent Health Research Group at Johns Hopkins University and at the American Association of People with Dis- abilities. Mr. Branch graduated with a B.A. in psychology from the Uni- versity of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Judith L. Estep is a program associate at the IOM. She has worked at the National Academies Institute of Medicine since 1986 and has provided administrative support for more than 45 published reports. Her interests outside the IOM include family (14 grandchildren), four- wheeling, and working her draft horses for competition and wagon riding.

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