APPENDIXES



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Assessment of the NASA Applied Sciences Program APPENDIXES

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Assessment of the NASA Applied Sciences Program This page intentionally left blank.

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Assessment of the NASA Applied Sciences Program A Committee and Staff Biographies Thomas J. Wilbanks, Chair, is a corporate research fellow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and leads the laboratory’s Global Change and Developing Country programs. He conducts research and publishes extensively on such issues as sustainable development, energy and environmental policy, responses to global climate change, and the role of geographical scale in all of these regards; he has more than three decades of experience in relating nature-society knowledge to decision support, including federal agency implementation of the Government Performance Results Act. Dr. Wilbanks is a past president of the Association of American Geographers, a member of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council, chair of NRC’s Committee on Human Dimensions of Global Change, a member of the Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Needs of the NRC decadal study of Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future, and a member of a current NRC panel on public participation in environmental assessment and decision making. He is also a member of the Scientific Steering Group for the U.S. Carbon Cycle Research Program and is serving as coordinating lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group II, Chapter 7: Industry, Settlement, and Society. Dr. Wilbanks received his B.A. from Trinity University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Syracuse University. Michael Auerbach, Ph.D., biological science, Florida State University, is executive director and research professor for the Division of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences at the Desert Research Institute. His previous experience in research administration and project supervision includes service as chair of the Department of Biology, University of Charleston (South

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Assessment of the NASA Applied Sciences Program Carolina), acting director of the Grice Marine Laboratory (Charleston, South Carolina), and director of the Ecology Program at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Auerbach held a postdoctoral position at Hebrew University, Jerusalem, before joining the Biology Department at the University of North Dakota. His research expertise is in population and community ecology, with a focus on insect and plant interactions, particularly those involving non-native taxa; forecasting ecological change along environmental gradients; and food web stability. Dr. Auerbach’s past research has also included examination of the determinants of species richness and biodiversity and patterns of endemism. He received his M.S. in biological science from Florida State University and his B.S. in biology from State University of New York at Stony Brook. Nancy M. Dickson, M.S. of Regional Planning, Cornell University, is a senior researcher at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and codirector of the Sustainability Science Program. Her research addresses the question of how science, technology, and knowledge can be more effectively brought to bear on creating solutions to problems of public policy. Her work focuses on two areas. The first is on knowledge systems for decision support—understanding how the choice of institutions and procedures for linking practitioners and experts influences knowledge production and its effects. The second is on sustainability science, an area encompassing use-inspired fundamental research on interactions between human and environmental systems. George L. Frederick, M.S., University of Wisconsin, is strategic development manager for Vaisala Wind Profilers in Boulder, Colorado. He began his career in meteorology as a weather officer in the U.S. Air Force after graduating from the Air Force Academy with a B.S. degree in engineering science. He retired as the commander of the Air Weather Service after 30 years in the Air Force. During his military career he planned for the use of unmanned aerial vehicles for weather reconnaissance, developed the roadmap for modernization of the Air Weather Service, and directed planning for weather support for B-2 bombers. He has served as president of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the National Weather Association, is an AMS fellow, and has served on the AMS Council and Executive Committee. Awards for his work have included the Bronze Star and the Legion of Merit. Mr. Frederick served as a member of the NRC Committee on NOAA NESDIS Transition from Research to Operations, Committee on Weather Research for Surface Transportation: The Roadway Environment, and as a member of the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate.

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Assessment of the NASA Applied Sciences Program B. John Garrick (NAE), Ph.D., engineering and applied science, University of California, Los Angeles, is an independent consultant who currently serves as chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (presidential appointment). He has an active consulting practice in the development and application of the risk sciences to systems in the nuclear, space, chemical, and marine fields. His research interests include the quantification and importance ranking of risks to humans and the environment to support societal decision making. He has served on numerous NRC committees, the most recent of which are the Committee on Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope, Committee on Combating Terrorism, and Committee on End Points for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russia and the United States. He received the Society for Risk Analysis Distinguished Achievement Award and was appointed to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste in 1994. Dr. Garrick was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993. John R. Jensen, Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, is a Carolina Distinguished Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. Dr. Jensen has served on the following NRC committees: Steering Committee for the Conference on Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Technologies for Transportation, Committee on the Geographic Foundation for Agenda 21 (chair), and Steering Committee on Space Applications and Commercialization (chair), and Committee on Research Priorities in Geography at the U.S. Geological Survey. He is a member of the NRC Mapping Science Committee. Thomas L. Mote, Ph.D., geography (climatology), University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is associate professor of geography at the University of Georgia, where he is also director of the Climate Research Laboratory. He previously held a faculty position in the School of Aerospace Sciences at the University of North Dakota. His current work involves development of global databases of seasonal snow cover using blended satellite, modeled and observational sources. He has also been involved in research regarding the hazards of severe weather across the United States. Dr. Mote received his M.A. in geography (climatology) from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a B.A. in geography and communication from the University of North Dakota. Dr. Frank E. Muller-Karger, Ph.D., University of Maryland, is dean of the School of Marine Science and Technology at the University of Mas-

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Assessment of the NASA Applied Sciences Program sachusetts at Dartmouth. He was a professor of biological oceanography and directed the Institute for Marine Remote Sensing at the College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, in St. Petersburg. Dr. Muller-Karger conducts research on marine primary production using satellite remote sensing, large data sets, networking, and high-speed computing. Dr. Muller-Karger is currently serving on the NRC Ocean Studies Board and as a U.S. representative on the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research of the International Council for Science. Dennis Ojima, Ph.D., Colorado State, is the interim director and a senior research scientist in the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory at Colorado State University. Recent research interests and investigations focus on understanding ecosystem dynamics in relation to Earth system science and the impact of human intervention. Dr. Ojima has served on the following NRC committees: U.S. National Committee on Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) and Panel on New Research on Population and the Environment. Jonathan A. Patz, M.D., Case Western Reserve University, M.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, and medical boards in occupational and environmental medicine, is an associate professor of environmental studies and population health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He directs a universitywide initiative on global environmental health. He is an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and also an affiliate scientist of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. James Rattling Leaf Sr., B.S., environmental science, University of Colorado-Boulder, is the Land and Natural Resource Program director of the Geo-Spatial Applications Center and the Sicangu Policy Institute, Sinte Gleska University, South Dakota. Mr. Rattling Leaf manages a wide area of education, research, and outreach activities that utilize GIS, GPS and remote sensing tools to develop programs designed to increase leadership capabilities and technological consciousness in tribal colleges and universities. Recent grants from NASA Research, Education, Applications Solutions Network and from NASA Goddard, NSF, NOAA, USGS Earth Science and Climate Change Programs have been part of these efforts. Active in establishing partnerships in the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium, he has also taken a leading role in establishing a new partnership model between government, industry, and tribal communities, a result of which was the implementation of a Memorandum of Understanding with the USGS.

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Assessment of the NASA Applied Sciences Program Andrew R. Solow, Ph.D., Stanford University, is a senior scientist and director of the Marine Policy Center at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His research is in the area of environmental and ecological statistics. Dr. Solow's most recent participation on NRC committees are the Committee on Evaluation of the Sea Grant Program Review Process, Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan, and the Committee on Future Needs in Deep Submergence Science. National Research Council Staff Elizabeth A. Eide (study director from November 2005 to September 2006 and from August 2007; co-study director from October 2006 to July 2007) is a senior program officer with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academies. Her areas of expertise include geochronology, petrology, and geochemistry applied to crustal processes and regional tectonics. Before joining the Academies, she worked for the Geological Survey of Norway, managing a noble gas geochronology laboratory and administrating personnel, budget and research programs in geology and geophysics. She received her Ph.D. in geology from Stanford University and a B.A. in geology from Franklin and Marshall College. Paul M. Cutler (co-study director from October 2006 to July 2007) was a senior program officer with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academies. His interests are in surficial processes, hydrology, glaciology, global change, mapping science, and geographical science. Earlier work at the National Academies was with the Polar Research Board and Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate. Before joining the Academies, Dr. Cutler was an assistant scientist and lecturer in geology and geophysics at the University of Wisconsin. He holds a Ph.D. in geology (University of Minnesota), an M.S. in geography (University of Toronto) and a B.S. in geography (Manchester University, England). In addition to postdoctoral work on numerical modeling of the Laurentide and Scandinavian ice sheets, he has carried out fieldwork in Alaska, Antarctica, Arctic Sweden, the Canadian Rockies, the Swiss Alps, and the Karakoram Mountains of Pakistan. Jared P. Eno (until April 2006) is a senior program assistant with the Board on Earth Science and Resources. Before coming to the National Academies, he interned at Human Rights Watch’s Arms Division, working on the 2004 edition of the Landmine Monitor Report. Jared received his A.B. in physics from Brown University.

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Assessment of the NASA Applied Sciences Program Nicholas D. Rogers (from April 2006) is a senior program assistant with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He received a B.A. in history, with a focus on the history of science and early American history, from Western Connecticut State University in 2004. He began working for the National Academies in 2006 and has primarily supported the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources on Earth resource and geographical science issues.