APPENDIXES



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A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey APPENDIXES

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A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey A Committee and Staff Biographies Robert P. Denaro, Chair, is vice president of NAVTEQ, a corporation that specializes in digital road maps for navigation, and is leading NAVTEQ's new thrust into Advanced Driver Assistance Systems. He holds a master's degree in electrical engineering from the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology, a master's degree in systems management from the University of Southern California, and a bachelor's degree in engineering sciences (Astronautics) from the U.S. Air Force Academy. Mr. Denaro joined NAVTEQ from Rand McNally & Co. where he was senior vice president and general manager of Global Business Solutions, responsible for business-to-business applications and consumer technology products and services in mapping and routing. Prior to joining Rand McNally, Mr. Denaro was vice president and director of Motorola's Consumer Telematics Products, a division he launched after heading the company's Global Positioning System (GPS) business for five years. Earlier in his career, Mr. Denaro launched Trimble Navigation's Fleet Management and Vehicle Tracking Division and was co-founder of TAU Corporation, producer of the first commercial differential GPS systems. He started his career in the U.S. Air Force, where he served for nine years, initially working on research, development, and flight testing of the first cockpit digital map displays, and ultimately carrying out research and development as a captain at the Navstar Global Positioning System Joint Program Office. Mr. Denaro is a member of the National Research Council's Mapping Science Committee, a former member of the Board of Directors of the Intelligent Transportation Society of America (ITS America) and served as a Policy Board Director of the 511 National Traveler Information Number Deployment Coalition. He is a past vice president of the Institute of Navigation, past vice chairman of the U.S. GPS Industry Council, and was a North Atlantic Treaty

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A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey Organization (NATO) Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development (AGARD) lecturer. Kate Beard-Tisdale is a professor in the Department of Spatial Information Science Engineering at the University of Maine. She is director of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA). She holds an M.S. (1984) and a Ph.D. (1988) from the Institute for Environmental Studies, Land Resources Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison where she specialized in geographic information systems. Her research interests cover multiple representations and cartographic generalization; investigations and visualization of data quality and uncertainty; metadata services, representation, and visualization; digital libraries; the integration of geospatial data and imagery; and gazetteer development. Her recent research addresses modeling, analysis, and visualization of space-time events. She is participating in a new research project that involves collaboration with oceanographers to develop an ontology of ocean-related events, to detect oceanographic events from multiple ocean observing sensors, and to develop methods for exploration of event patterns. Dr. Beard also collaborates on other applications-oriented projects in areas such as water resources and bioinformatics. She serves on the Editorial Board of URISA Journal and is a member of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping, the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association, the Geospatial Information Technology Association, and the Association for American Geographers. She has been a member of the NRC U.S. National Committee for CODATA since 2003. Cynthia A. Brewer is a professor in the Department of Geography at The Pennsylvania State University. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography with emphasis in cartography from Michigan State University. Her research interests are in map design, color theory applications in cartography, multiscale and multirepresentation cartography, hypothesis generation in visualization, choropleth classification for maps in series, and atlas mapping. Dr. Brewer is a consultant to Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI), doing cartographic critique of ArcGIS 9.0 and multiscale map design, and to the Population Division of the U.S. Census Bureau, where she planned and produced a diversity atlas of the 2000 Census and did design and analysis consulting for the comprehensive second atlas. She is currently chair of the U.S. National Committee to the International Cartographic Association, was president of the North American Cartographic Information Society in 1998-1999, and has been a member of the Editorial Board of Cartography and Geographic Information Science since 2000. She is the author of Designing Better Maps: A Guide for GIS Users, ESRI Press, 2005.

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A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey Michael Domaratz is a senior technical consultant with the Geospatial Information Technology practice of Michael Baker Jr., Inc. His duties include supporting geospatial data coordination activities of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Flood Map Modernization program. He recently retired from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), where his responsibilities included implementing The National Map, a plan to provide current and accurate digital map data for the United States. He also had responsibilities for coordinating with the Bureau of the Census and internal USGS activities related to transportation data development. Mr. Domaratz co-chaired the Homeland Security Working Group of the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC). Previous positions included serving as a liaison in the office of the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science in the Department of the Interior and as the executive secretary, metadata coordinator, and framework coordinator for the FGDC. He also held research, procurement, and production positions in USGS. He is a member of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping and the Association for Computing Machinery. He has received the U.S. Department of the Interior Distinguished Service Award (highest service award) and an Outstanding Service Award from the National States Geographic Information Council. Mr. Domaratz has a B.A. in geography from the State University of New York at Buffalo and did graduate work in geography at the Ohio State University. Peng Gong is a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California-Berkeley and director of the Center for Assessment and Monitoring of Forest and Environmental Resources. He received a B.S. and M.S. in geography from Nanjing University, China, and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Waterloo, Canada, in 1990. His research involves using remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) to monitor and map natural resources and human settlement. Specific areas of research include feature extraction, land use and land cover mapping, change detection, uncertainty modeling and error analysis, photo-ecometrics, and automated map generalization. Projects include the development of algorithms for forest fire monitoring and mapping; soil diversity studies; invasive species monitoring; and the development of an image-based analysis system for precise ecological measurements. He has written numerous books in Chinese and one in English on remote sensing, GIS, and land use-land cover. He is the director of International Institute for Earth System Science, Nanjing University, and director of the State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science, jointly sponsored by the Institute of Remote Sensing Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Beijing Normal University, China. Dr. Gong is editor-in-chief of Geographic Information Sciences, editor of the International Journal of Remote Sensing, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Remote Sensing.

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A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey Robert B. McMaster is professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of Minnesota. He received a B.A. (cum laude) from Syracuse University in 1978 and a Ph.D. in geography and meteorology from the University of Kansas in 1983. His research interests include automated generalization (including algorithmic development and testing, the development of conceptual models, and interface design), environmental risk assessment (including assessing environmental injustice to hazardous materials, the development of new spatial methodologies for environmental justice, and the development of risk assessment models), and the history of U.S. academic cartography. He has coauthored several books including Map Generalization: Making Rules for Knowledge Representation (Longman Publishing Group, 1991), Generalization in Digital Cartography (Association of American Geographers 1992), Thematic Cartography and Geographic Visualization (Prentice Hall, 2003), A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science, and Scale and Geographic Inquiry (with E. Sheppard, CRC Press, 2004). Dr. McMaster has served as editor of the journal on Cartography and Geographic Information Systems from 1990-1996, and is an editor of the Association of American Geographers' Resource Publications in Geography. He served as a member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Cartographic Association, president of the U.S. Cartography and Geographic Information Society, and is a University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) board member; he chairs the UCGIS Research Committee. In 1999, he was elected as a vice president of the International Cartographic Association, and was reelected in 2003. He is a member of the NRC Mapping Science Committee. Ming-Hsiang (Ming) Tsou is an associate professor in the Department of Geography, San Diego State University. He received a B.S. from National Taiwan University in 1991, an M.A. from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1996, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2001, all in Geography. His research interests are in Internet mapping and distributed GIS applications, mobile GIS and wireless communication, multimedia cartography and user interface design, and software agents and distributed computing technologies. He has applied his research interests in applications such as wildfire mapping, environmental monitoring and management, habitat conservation, and border security. He is coauthor of the book, Internet GIS: Distributed Geographic Information Services for the Internet and Wireless Networks (John Wiley & Sons, 2003). Dr. Tsou has been the cochair of the National Aeronautics and Space Admininistration (NASA) Earth Science Enterprise Data System Working Group (ESEDWG) Standard Process Group (SPG) from 2004 to present. He is a member of the Association of American Geographers and the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping. He received the 2004 Outstanding Faculty Award at San Diego State University and was recently elected

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A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey as the 2006-2007 vice chair of the Cartographic Specialty Group in the Association of American Geographers. John P. Wilson is professor of geography at the University of Southern California, where he directs the GIS Research Laboratory. He studies the development of new terrain analysis techniques; modeling of soil erosion, vegetation, and water quality processes and problems; modeling of spatial patterns of urban growth and habitat change and impact of land use change, urban growth, and conservation policies on these patterns; description of environmental and socioeconomic characteristics and their impacts on selected health and quality-of-life outcomes; and the development of web-based map and gazetteer services for digital libraries and archives. He has held several visiting appointments in environmental studies, geography, and planning at the Australian National University, the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, and the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Dr. Wilson founded the journal Transactions in GIS (Blackwell Publishers) in 1996 and has served as editor-in-chief since its inception. He has served on the editorial board of Applied Geography (1992-2001) and has just started a four-year term on the Editorial Board of the Annals of the Association of American Geographers. He has chaired the Applied Geography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers (1989-1991) and the Research Committee of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (2002-2005). He is currently president of the University Consortium of Geographic Information Science and an active participant in the UNIGIS International Network, a worldwide consortium of more than 20 institutions that collaborate on the development and delivery of online geographic information science academic programs. He has published numerous books and articles on these topics, including two edited volumes, Terrain Analysis: Principles and Applications (John Wiley and Sons, 2000) and the Handbook of Geographic Information Science (Blackwell Publishers, 2006). National Research Council Staff Paul M. Cutler is a senior program officer with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academies. His interests are in surficial processes, hydrology, glaciology, global change, mapping science, and geographical science. Earlier work at the National Academies was with the Polar Research Board and the Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate. Prior to joining the Academies, Dr. Cutler was an assistant scientist and lecturer in geology and geophysics at the University of Wisconsin. He holds a Ph.D. in geology (University of Minnesota), an M.Sc. in geography (University of Toronto) and a B.Sc. in geography (Manchester University, England). In addition to postdoctoral work on numerical modeling of the Laurentide and Scandinavian ice sheets

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A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), he has carried out fieldwork in Alaska, Antarctica, Arctic Sweden, the Canadian Rockies, the Swiss Alps, and the Karakoram Mountains of Pakistan.