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Appendix D
Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Workshop Speakers

PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P. (Chair), is the executive director at the Task Force for Child Survival and Development. Before assuming his current position, Dr. Rosenberg served the Public Health Service at the CDC for 20 years. During this time, he led CDC’s work in violence prevention, and later became the first permanent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of the special assistant for behavioral science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). In his early work with CDC, he worked in the smallpox eradication effort and in enteric diseases. Dr. Rosenberg is a member of the boards of directors of both the American Suicide Foundation and the National Safety Council. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior and the co-editor in chief of Injury Control and Safety Promotion. Dr. Rosenberg is board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He was educated at Harvard University, where he received his undergraduate degree as well as degrees in public policy and medicine. He completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital, a residency in psychiatry at Boston Beth Israel Hospital, and a residency in preventive medicine at CDC. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s research and programmatic interests are concentrated on injury control and violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, and child well-being with special attention to behavioral sciences, evaluation,



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Appendix D Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Workshop Speakers PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P. (Chair), is the executive director at the Task Force for Child Survival and Development. Before assuming his cur- rent position, Dr. Rosenberg served the Public Health Service at the CDC for 20 years. During this time, he led CDC’s work in violence prevention, and later became the first permanent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of the special assistant for behavioral science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). In his early work with CDC, he worked in the smallpox eradication effort and in enteric diseases. Dr. Rosenberg is a member of the boards of directors of both the American Suicide Foundation and the National Safety Council. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Suicide and Life- Threatening Behavior and the co-editor in chief of Injury Control and Safety Promotion. Dr. Rosenberg is board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He was educated at Harvard Uni- versity, where he received his undergraduate degree as well as degrees in public policy and medicine. He completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital, a residency in psychiatry at Boston Beth Israel Hospital, and a residency in preventive medicine at CDC. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s research and programmatic interests are concentrated on injury control and violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, and child well-being with special attention to behavioral sciences, evaluation, 27

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2 APPENDIX D and health communications. He has authored more than 120 publications and has received the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal as well as the Meritorious Service Medal, Distinguished Service Medal, and Outstand- ing Service Medals from the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Rosenberg is a member of the Institute of Medicine. James A. Mercy, Ph.D. (Vice-Chair), is the special adviser for strategic directions of the Division of Violence Prevention in the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control of the CDC. He received his Ph.D. in sociology from Emory University in Atlanta in 1982. After his graduation, Dr. Mercy began working at CDC in a newly formed activity to examine violence as a public health problem. Over the past two decades he has played a fundamental role in developing the public health approach to violence. He has conducted and overseen numerous studies of the epide- miology of youth suicide, family violence, homicide, and firearm injuries. He also served as a coeditor of the WHO World Report on Violence and Health. Most recently, he served on the editorial board of the United Nation’s Secretary-General’s Study of Violence Against Children. Sir George A.O. Alleyne, M.D., is a native of Barbados. He obtained his bachelor of medicine and surgery degree from the University of London in 1957 and his M.D. from the same university in 1965. He began a career in academic medicine in 1962 at the University of the West Indies and was appointed professor of medicine in 1972. Dr. Alleyne has served as a member of various bodies, including the Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee of the World Health Organization (WHO), Tropical Disease Research Program, and the Institute of Medicine Committee on Scientific Investigation in Developing Countries. From 1970 to 1981, Dr. Alleyne served as a member and chair of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Advisory Committee on Medical Research. Dr. Alleyne joined the PAHO staff in 1981 as chief of research promotion and coordination. In 1983 he became director of health programs development, and in 1990 he became assistant director of the organization. In 1995, Dr. Alleyne began his first term as director of the Pan American Health Organization. Equity and Pan Americanism are principles that resonate throughout Dr. Alleyne’s work and writings, and guide the execution of the PAHO’s regional pro- gramming, reflecting a persistent search to achieve the goal of health for all. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II made him knight bachelor in 1990 for his services to medicine. In 2001, Sir George Alleyne was awarded the Order of the Caribbean Community, the highest honor that can be conferred on a Caribbean national. He ended his second four-year term as director of PAHO in 2003.

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2 APPENDIX D Robert Alexander Butchart, M.A., Ph.D., is the prevention of violence coordinator in WHO’s Department of Injuries and Violence Prevention. His main task is to implement the recommendations of the World Report on Violence and Health. This involves the development of technical guidelines, policy papers, and research that can be used to support applied prevention programs and advocate for increased investment in violence prevention. Specific projects include country-level violence prevention demonstration programs, the systematic documentation of violence prevention programs, and research into the economic dimensions of interpersonal violence, including the costs of its consequences and the cost-effectiveness of preven- tive programs. After receiving his master’s degree in clinical psychology in 1986, he worked in Johannesburg, South Africa, as coordinator of a brain injury assessment and rehabilitation clinic and in 1989 helped conduct the first epidemiological study of non-fatal injuries in that city. In 1994 he was on the steering committee of the Goldstone Commission’s investigation into political violence and children in South Africa. He completed his doctorate in 1995, with a focus on the sociology of public health in Africa. In 1999- 2000 he was a visiting scientist in the Karolinska Institute and from 1998 to 2001 was principal investigator for the South African Violence Injury Surveillance Consortium and a founder of the Uganda-based Injury Preven- tion Initiative for Africa. Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Ph.D., R.N., is the Anna D. Wolf Chair at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Dr. Campbell’s overall research and policy initiatives are in the area of family violence and violence against women, with continuous research funding since 1984 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH; National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse [NIDA], National Institute of Mental Health [NIMH]), the National Institute of Justice, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Department of Defense, including being principal investigator on three NIH, two CDC, one Department of Defense, and one National Institute of Justice funded research grants on battering. Specific research areas include risk factors and assessment for intimate partner homicide, abuse during pregnancy, marital rape, physical and men- tal health effects of intimate partner violence, prevention of dating violence, and interventions to prevent and address domestic violence. Her research results are used as the basis of health policy recommendations to state, national, and international organizations. Dr. Campbell’s awards include fellowship in the American Academy of Nursing, the Kellogg National Leadership Program, a Robert Wood Johnson Urban Health Fellowship, three honorary doctorates, and the Simon Visiting Scholar at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom. She has authored or coauthored more than 125 articles and chapters, mainly about battered women and

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20 APPENDIX D family violence. She is author, coauthor, or editor of five books: Nursing Care of Survivors of Family Violence (1993); Sanctions and Sanctuary: Cul- tural Perspectives on the Beating of Wives (1992), which has been updated and is now called To Have & To Hit; Assessing Dangerousness: Violence by Sexual Offenders, Batterers and Child Abusers (1999); Ending Domes- tic Violence: Changing Public Perceptions/Halting the Epidemic (1997); Empowering Survivors of Abuse: Health Care for Battered Women and Their Children (1998), and Family Violence in Nursing Practice (2004). Dr. Campbell has also been working with wife abuse shelters and advocacy organizations for the last 25 years, including leading support groups and serving on four shelter boards. Currently, she is on the boards of directors of the Family Violence Prevention Fund in San Francisco and the House of Ruth in Baltimore, and has served on the congressionally appointed Depart- ment of Defense (DoD) Task Force on Domestic Violence. Dr. Campbell is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Darnell Hawkins, Ph.D., J.D., is currently professor emeritus in the Depart- ment of African American Studies at the University of Illinois, Chicago. He specializes in criminology and the sociology of law and conducts research on topics that bridge the intersection between race-ethnicity and crime-justice. Dr. Hawkins is a member of the MacArthur Foundation Network on Ado- lescent Development and Juvenile Justice and of the Committee on Law and Justice of the National Research Council. He has been a member of the National Academies Committee on Law and Justice; Committee on Assess- ment of Family Violence Interventions; Panel on Juvenile Crime: Prevention, Treatment, and Control; and chair of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Minority Graduate Panel on Anthropology and Sociology. WORKSHOP SPEAKERS Carl C. Bell, M.D., is president and chief executive officer of Community Mental Health Council, Inc. (a $21 million comprehensive CMHC in Chicago with 360 employees), is principal investigator of “Using CHAMP to Prevent Youth HIV Risk in a South African Township,” an NIMH R-01 Grant. He is director of public and community psychiatry, clinical professor of psychiatry and public health, and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Vio- lence Prevention Research Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has 350 publications, the most recent being The Sanity of Survival: Reflections on Community Mental Health and Wellness (2004) and Eight Pieces of Brocade—a 45-minute chi kung exercise DVD. Stephen Blount, M.D., M.P.H., is responsible for CDC’s global health portfolio, which includes an annual budget of $900 million, 200 U.S.

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2 APPENDIX D government staff assigned to 50 countries, and 1,500 locally hired staff and contractors. He provides programmatic and financial oversight for the Global AIDS Program; global immunization and disease eradication activities; malaria, tuberculosis, and tobacco control efforts; and inter- national training programs. Dr. Blount is the lead strategist for CDC’s global activities and manages key partnerships with ministries of health, other U.S. government agencies, UN organizations, the World Bank, private foundations, multinational corporations, nongovernmental organizations, and academic institutions. As the first director of the Office for Global Health in 1997, Dr. Blount led the development of CDC’s global health strategy, including goals, objectives, priority program areas, and perfor- mance measures. Since 2003, as part of the first agency-wide transforma- tion of CDC’s structure since 1980, Dr. Blount has led the reorganization of its international activities to better align human, technical, and financial resources with the agency’s goals and priorities and to improve global busi- ness services. After training in family medicine and public health, Dr. Blount served as the director of epidemiology at the Detroit Health Department before joining CDC. From 1993 to 1997, he was assigned to the World Health Organisation and worked at the Caribbean Epidemiology Center in Trinidad, where he served as director. He received his B.S. in psychology in 1975, his M.D. in 1978 from Tufts University, and his M.P.H. in 1980 from the University of Michigan. Holly Burkhalter is vice president of government relations for the Inter- national Justice Mission (IJM), an international human rights agency that assists victims of violence, sexual exploitation, slavery, and oppression. Ms. Burkhalter graduated from Iowa State University in 1978 (Phi Beta Kappa) and received the University’s Outstanding Young Alumnus award in 1984. Before beginning her career with IJM, Ms. Burkhalter most recently served as the U.S. policy director of Physicians for Human Rights, a Boston- based human rights organization specializing in medical, scientific, and forensic investigations of violations of internationally recognized human rights. Prior to joining Physicians for Human Rights, Ms. Burkhalter worked with Human Rights Watch for 14 years as advocacy director and director of its Washington office. Previously, Ms. Burkhalter staffed the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Human Rights and International Organizations from 1981 to 1983. From 1977 to 1981 she worked for Representative (now Senator) Tom Harkin (D.-Iowa). Eric D. Caine, M.D., joined the faculty of the University of Rochester in 1978, following medical school at Harvard, residency training at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center and the National Institute of Mental Health, and further postdoctoral research at NIMH. During college and

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22 APPENDIX D medical school, his interests focused primarily on substance abuse treat- ment, suicide, and end-of-life issues. The first two were tied specifically to fundamental concerns about public health, prevention, and public policy development. As he progressed through medical school and his psychiatry residency, Dr. Caine focused on the relationships between organized brain functioning and behavioral disorders; in addition to the standard residency he pursued additional training in neuropsychology and neurology as a means of fostering interests in “neuropsychiatry.” His research initially dealt with Huntington’s disease and Tourette’s syndrome and, to a lesser extent, Alzheimer’s disease. Suicide research and prevention gradually have become the focal points during the last 15 years both for investigation and for national and international consultation. His greatest personal career rewards in medicine, in addition to those related to patient care, have come from supporting this developmental process and seeing several generations of faculty emerge in their own right as outstanding researchers, educators, and clinicians. Presently Dr. Caine directs five NIH grants—among them, “The Developing Center for Public Health and Population Interventions for the Prevention of Suicide” (“PHP-Center,” NIMH/NIDA P20); “China- Rochester Suicide Research Training ICOHRTA” (NIH Fogarty Interna- tional Center D43); and “China Collaborative Suicide Research Training Program” (CCSRT; NIH Fogarty International Center D43). Alan Court, M.A., is currently the director of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Programme Division. Mr. Court joined UNICEF in 1975 where he oversees the centerpiece of UNICEF’s work. In this capacity, he is at the forefront of program policy, guidance, and management intended to assist staff in the implementation and success of UNICEF programs and plays a central role in guiding UNICEF programs toward the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. Prior to this, Mr. Court served as director of the UNICEF Supply Division in Copenhagen, where he was credited with turning the division’s function into an innovative and cutting- edge one that provides essential commodities and services to governments through a mix of programs and procurement services that directly impact program implementation as well as delivery performance, especially in humanitarian emergencies. Before serving at these two headquarters loca- tions, Mr. Court had a long and distinguished career in the field where, from August 1998 to December 2000, he was the UNICEF country rep- resentative in India. Beforehand, he served as deputy regional director of the Americas and Caribbean region in Bogotá, Colombia, after having served as UNICEF representative in Bolivia from 1993 to 1995. In 1992, he served as special representative in the former Yugoslavia. Prior to that, he was the UNICEF representative in Chad after having served as program coordinator in Nepal. In 1983, Mr. Court was the program planning officer

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2 APPENDIX D in Ethiopia, after having managed nutrition and agricultural programs in Indonesia. His first appointment with UNICEF was in Bangladesh from 1975 to 1978. Mr. Court holds a master’s degree in rural social develop- ment from the University of Reading School of Education. He is a national of the United Kingdom. Linda L. Dahlberg, Ph.D., is the associate director for science in the Divi- sion of Violence Prevention at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In her current position, Dr. Dahlberg serves as one of the senior advisers on matters of science and policy to the director of the Division of Violence Prevention. She also coordinates international research and pro- grammatic activities for the division and serves as a subject matter expert and consultant on a number of international scientific planning committees and advisory boards. Dr. Dahlberg has spent much of the past 15 years working in the area of violence prevention—specifically on the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions to reduce violence. More recently she served as the executive scientific editor of the World Report on Violence and Health—published by WHO in October 2002. She has authored and coauthored many publications in peer-reviewed journals, has given numer- ous presentations across the United States and abroad, and has received awards of excellence in both teaching and research. Dr. Dahlberg holds a B.A. degree from the University of Northern Colorado, and an M.A. and Ph.D., both in sociology, from Indiana University-Bloomington. John Donnelly is a reporter in the Washington bureau of the Boston Globe, covering global and domestic health and the environment. From 2003 to mid-2006, he opened and ran the Globe’s first-ever Africa bureau. Based in South Africa, he traveled widely around the continent, focusing on a wide range of health issues, including AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and the attempt to eradicate polio; politics; counterterrorism; development policy; and the future of oil in Africa. Before moving to Africa, he was the Globe’s foreign affairs correspondent for five years, based in Washington. Prior to the September 11th attacks, he examined the differences between what was said in Washington and what was happening around the world, traveling to the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. After the attacks, he covered the buildup to the war in Afghanistan, the war in Afghanistan, the buildup to the Iraq war, and the war in Iraq. In addition, in 2002, he directed a year-long global health project at the Globe called “Lives Lost’’ that looked at how simple interventions could save millions of lives every year. The project won several major awards in 2004. In recent years, Donnelly has received awards from the Global Health Council, RESULTS, InterAction, and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Prior to joining the Globe, he worked for a year in Washington

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2 APPENDIX D for Knight Ridder Newspapers and spent four years based in Jerusalem and Cairo covering the Middle East for Knight Ridder and the Miami Herald. At the Herald, he was part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurri- cane Andrew and was one of four reporters on its Enterprise Team, winning an award for his coverage of health issues in Haiti. He has also worked for the Associated Press in New York City and in Vermont and was a staff reporter for the Burlington Free Press. He attended the University of Maine and University of Vermont, majoring in English. He was a Duke University Media Fellow during the fall of 2000 and will soon begin a nine-month fellowship with the Kaiser Family Foundation to study U.S. programs designed to help orphans in Africa. Marco Ferroni, Ph.D., is deputy manager of the Sustainable Development Department at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) in Washington, D.C. Earlier in his career, he was the bank’s principal evaluation officer, a senior adviser to the World Bank, a member of the Board of Executive Directors at the IDB, and a senior economist and manager at the Ministries of Public Economy and Foreign Affairs in Switzerland. Mr. Ferroni holds a Ph.D. from Cornell University and has published on foreign aid, debt and development finance, public expenditure reform, international public goods, and the interrelationship between trade and macroeconomic regimes and agricultural growth. He is the author, with Ashoka Mody, of International Public Goods: Incentives, Measurement, and Financing (Kluwer Academic Publishers and the World Bank, 2002). Thomas E. Feucht, Ph.D., is the deputy director for research and evalua- tion at the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), U.S. Department of Justice. A member of the Senior Executive Service, he heads NIJ’s Office of Research and Evaluation, the social and behavioral science section of NIJ. Dr. Feucht received his doctorate in sociology in 1986 from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, with an emphasis on quantitative research methods and statistics. From 1987 to 1994, Dr. Feucht served on the faculty at Cleveland State University (CSU), in the Sociology Department and the College of Urban Affairs. Dr. Feucht joined the staff at the National Insti- tute of Justice in 1994. From 1996 until 1998, he served as director of the Crime Control and Prevention Division’s Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE). In that position, Dr. Feucht managed NIJ’s research portfolios in the areas of law enforcement, crime prevention, and substance abuse. In 1998, Dr. Feucht became ORE’s deputy director; in 2005, was appointed to the federal government’s Senior Executive Service and became NIJ’s deputy director for research and evaluation. Dr. Feucht serves on the Social, Behav- ioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE) Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council, White House Office of Science and Technology

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2 APPENDIX D Policy. This interagency working group is responsible for helping to shape SBE research policy across the federal government. From 1998 to 2000, Dr. Feucht served as chief of staff to the Attorney General’s Methamphetamine Interagency Task Force, established as part of the 1996 Methamphetamine Control Act. He has conducted and published research in the areas of sub- stance abuse, intravenous drug use and HIV, prostitution, prison drug use, and school violence. James Garbarino, Ph.D., holds the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology and is director of the Center for the Human Rights of Children at Loyola University, Chicago. Previously he was Elizabeth Lee Vincent Professor of Human Development and co-director of the Family Life Devel- opment Center at Cornell University. He earned his B.A. from St. Lawrence University in 1968 and his Ph.D. in human development and family studies from Cornell University in 1973. He is a fellow of the American Psycho- logical Association. Dr. Garbarino has served as consultant or adviser to a wide range of organizations, including the National Committee to Pre- vent Child Abuse, the National Institute for Mental Health, the American Medical Association, the National Black Child Development Institute, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 1991 he undertook missions for UNICEF to assess the impact of the Gulf War on children in Kuwait and Iraq, and he has served as a consultant for programs serving Vietnamese, Bosnian, and Croatian child refugees. Books he has authored or edited include See Jane Hit: Why Girls Are Growing More Violent and What We Can Do About It (2006) and And Words Can Hurt Forever: How to Protect Adolescents from Bullying, Harassment, and Emotional Violence (2002). He also serves as a scientific expert witness in criminal and civil cases involving issues of violence and children. Some of Dr. Garbarino’s most recent awards and honors include the Brandt F. Steele Award from the Kempe National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (1993); the American Psychological Association’s Division on Child, Youth and Family Services’ Nicholas Hobbs Award (1994); the President’s Celebrating Success Award from the National Association of School Psychologists (2003), and the Outstanding Service to Children Award of the Chicago Association for the Education of Young Children (2003). Richard Garfield, Dr.P.H., is the Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of Clinical International Nursing and coordinator of a WHO-PAHO Nursing Collabo- rating Center at Columbia University, and a visiting professor at Karolinska Institute in Sweden. He combines the qualitative perspective of community health promotion and the quantitative approaches of epidemiology to assess morbidity and mortality changes among civilian groups in humanitarian

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2 APPENDIX D crises around the world. He has assessed the impact of economic embargoes in Cuba, Haiti, Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Liberia for national governments and UN organizations. He has visited Iraq frequently since 1996 to collaborate with UNICEF, WHO, the World Food Program, and the Iraqi Ministry of Health. He was a coauthor of WHO’s World Report on Violence and Health and the report of the Independent Commission to Evaluate the Oil for Food Program (Volcker Commission). He is cur- rently running household studies focused on insecurity and recovery in Katrina-affected areas in the United States and in postwar areas of southern Sudan. David Gartner, J.D., is the policy director for the Global AIDS Alliance (GAA), an advocacy organization dedicated to achieving a comprehensive response to the AIDS pandemic and to expanding educational opportuni- ties in affected countries. Mr. Gartner previously worked as a counsel on the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee. He has appeared as a commentator on CBS, CNN, and NPR and written for a wide variety of publications, including the New York Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer and the Miami Herald. Mr. Gartner is a graduate of Yale Law School and did graduate work in political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; he was a visiting lecturer at Yale University. Rodrigo Guerrero, M.D., is currently the president of the board at Vallenpaz, a nongovernmental organization dedicated to work with peasants in rural areas of Colombia, a position he has held since 2000. Born in Cali, Colombia, he is currently emeritus at Universidad del Valle, in Cali, where he served as a professor, dean of the Division of Health Sci- ences (1972-1975), and president (1982-1984). He worked as the director of Universidad del Valle’s hospital from 1976 to 1978 and as the secretary of health for the City of Cali (1978-1980). He was elected mayor of Cali in 1992 and served for two years. In addition, Dr. Guerrero has served as president of the Carvajal Foundation (part time 1984-1992), as regional adviser for health and violence to the Pan-American Health Organization in Washington, D.C. (1995-1997), and as a consultant to the IDB, the World Bank, and other agencies. Dr. Guerrero holds memberships to number of organizations including the National Academy of Medicine (Colombia), the Colombian Society of Epidemiology, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine. He founded and directed Journal Colombia Médica (1980-1994) of which he is now director emeritus. In addition, he is a member of the editorial committees of several journals: Annals of Epidemiology; Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention; Injury Control and Safety Promotion; and Journal of Health & Population in Developing Countries. Dr. Guerrero has authored numerous publications in

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27 APPENDIX D scientific journals in the areas of epidemiology, physiology of reproduction, and prevention of violence. Rodney Hammond, Ph.D., is the director of the Division of Violence Preven- tion in the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC in Atlanta, Georgia, a position he has held since 1996. He is responsible for CDC research and programs to prevent child maltreatment, youth vio- lence, family and intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and suicide. The division oversees prevention research, surveillance, and programs in youth violence, family and intimate partner violence, child abuse, sexual assault, and suicide. He represents CDC in areas of violence prevention at WHO in Geneva, Switzerland, and PAHO in Washington, D.C. He was the CDC representative to the Health Working Group of the Gore-Mbecki Bilateral Commission to the Republic of South Africa. He is known for distinguished contributions in the area of youth violence prevention as a public health concern. For example, he is author and executive producer of “Dealing with Anger: A Violence Prevention Program for African American Youth,” which has been nationally recognized for its application to the problems of at-risk youth. He also developed Project PACT (Positive Adolescents Choices Train- ing), a widely disseminated program distinguished by successful violence prevention outcomes in schools and community settings. His publications appear in numerous health and science journals and books. He has received numerous awards for career contributions including the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service for his efforts in public health and mental health collaboration; the National Association of School Psychologists President’s Award for Mental Health; and the Society for Research on Adolescence Award for Adolescent Research and Policy Integration. Dr. Hammond is a fellow of the American Psycho- logical Association (APA) and the APA Division of Health Psychology. He is a past chair of the APA Board of Convention Affairs and vice chair of the Board of Governors of the National College of Professional Psychology. In 2006 he was inducted into the National Academy of Practice. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana and his Ph.D. in psychology at Florida State University in Tallahassee. He completed postdoctoral study at Harvard University. J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., is the Endowed Professor of Prevention and founding director of the Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, University of Washington in Seattle. He received his B.A. in 1967 from Stanford University and his Ph.D. in sociology from North- western University in 1975. His research focuses on understanding and preventing child and adolescent health and behavior problems. He is prin- cipal investigator of the Seattle Social Development Project, a longitudinal

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2 APPENDIX D study of 808 Seattle elementary school students who are now 30 years old. This project began in 1981 to test strategies for promoting successful development. He is also principal investigator of the Community Youth Development Study, a randomized field experiment involving 24 communi- ties across seven states testing the effectiveness of the Communities That Care prevention system developed by Hawkins and Richard F. Catalano. He has authored numerous articles and several books as well as preven- tion programs for parents and families, including Guiding Good Choices, Parents Who Care and Supporting School Success. He is past president of the Society for Prevention Research and has served on a number of national and state government committees including NIDA’s Epidemiology, Preven- tion and Services Research Review Committee; the Office for Substance Abuse Prevention’s National Advisory Committee; the NIH Study Section for Community Prevention and Control; the Department of Education’s Safe, Disciplined, Drug-Free Schools Expert Panel; and the Washington State Governor’s Substance Abuse Prevention Committee. He is a member of the editorial board of Prevention Science. He is listed in Who’s Who in Science and Engineering. He has won several awards such the Prevention Science Award from the Society for Prevention Research (1999), 1999 August Vollmer Award from the American Society of Criminology (1999), and the Paul Tappan Award from the Western Society of Criminology (2003). He is a fellow of the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Experimental Criminology. Fran Henry, M.B.A., created and directs Global Violence Prevention Advo- cacy, a project of the Pan American Health and Education Foundation that advances science-based prevention of violence in low- and middle-income countries. For 13 years she founded and directed Stop It Now!, an organiza- tion that uses science-based methods of public health to prevent the sexual abuse of children. Ms. Henry’s previous work includes owning a manage- ment consulting company (10 years) and directing presidential (Gerald Ford) and gubernatorial (Francis W. Sargent-Massachusetts) commissions for women. She served as staff to the National Commission on Observance of International Women’s Year. Ms. Henry received her undergraduate degree from the New School for Social Research and her graduate degree from Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration. As a volunteer, she chaired the board of the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, U.S., from 2000 to 2004. Kent R. Hill, Ph.D., is the assistant administrator for the Bureau for Global Health, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). From Novem- ber 2001 to October 2005, Hill served as assistant administrator for the Bureau for Europe and Eurasia at USAID. As assistant administrator of the

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2 APPENDIX D Bureau for Global Health, Hill is responsible for a bureau that manages or co-manages health programs all over the world). The bureau seeks to provide global leadership in the effort to improve the quality, availability, and use of essential health services. USAID focuses its efforts on HIV/AIDS, avian influenza, other infectious diseases (such as tuberculosis and malaria), maternal and child health, family planning, environmental health, and nutrition. Before coming to USAID, Hill served as president of Eastern Nazarene College in Quincy, Massachusetts, from 1992 to 2001. From 1986 to 1992, he was president of the Institute on Religion and Democracy in Washington, D.C. He taught European and Russian history at Seattle Pacific University from 1980 to 1986. A graduate of Northwest Nazarene College in Nampa, Idaho, Hill has a master’s degree in Russian studies and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Washington in Seattle. He has published books, articles, and reviews on human rights, intellectual history, international development, and matters related to religion in the former Soviet Union. He is a noted expert on democracy, international develop- ment policy, human rights, and international religious freedom issues. Tom R. Insel, M.D., is director of the National Institute of Mental Health, the component of NIH charged with generating the knowledge needed to understand, treat, and prevent mental disorders. With a budget of more than $1.4 billion, NIMH leads the nation’s research on disorders that affect an estimated 44 million Americans, including one in five children. Immediately prior to his appointment as director, Dr. Insel was professor of psychiatry at Emory University. There, he was founding director of the Center for Behav- ioral Neuroscience, one of the largest science and technology centers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and, concurrently, director of an NIH-funded Center for Autism Research. From 1994 to 1999, he was director of the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center in Atlanta. He has published more than 200 scientific articles and four books, including the Neurobiology of Parental Care (with Michael Numan) in 2003. Dr. Insel has served on numerous academic, scientific, and professional committees, including 10 editorial boards. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and a recipi- ent of several awards (A. E. Bennett Award from the Society for Biological Psychiatry, Curt Richter Prize from the International Society of Psychoneu- roendocrinology, Outstanding Service Award from the U.S. Public Health Service, and a Distinguished Investigator Award from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression). Dr. Insel graduated from the combined B.A.-M.D. program at Boston University in 1974. He did his internship at Berkshire Medical Center, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and his residency at the Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute at the University of California, San Francisco.

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20 APPENDIX D Kate Joseph, M.A., is a security policy adviser at the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID). She specializes in small arms control, armed violence reduction, post-conflict disarmament, and arms export control. Before joining DFID, Kate developed and man- aged programs on arms and development for the United Nations Develop- ment Programme (UNDP) in Geneva, Switzerland. She has also worked on security policy for the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) in Vienna, Austria, and for a security and arms control nongovernmental organization based in London and Washington, D.C. She has a B.A. in politics, philosophy, and economics from the University of Oxford, and an M.A. in international relations and international economics from the Johns Hopkins University. Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H., is the director of the Board on Global Health. He has subsequently also been appointed the director of the Board on African Science Academy Development. Dr. Kelley oversees a portfolio of expert consensus studies and convening activities on subjects as wide ranging as the evaluation of the U.S. emergency plan for international AIDS relief, the role of border quarantine programs for migrants in the twenty- first century, pandemic influenza control, and the approach to cancer in low- and middle-income countries. One unique capacity-building effort, the African Science Academy Development Initiative, is a 10-year under- taking to build the capacity of African academies to advise their govern- ments on scientific matters. Prior to coming to the National Academies, Dr. Kelley served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. In his last Defense Department position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS). This entailed managing emerging infections surveillance, response, training, and capacity-building activities through partnerships with numerous elements of the federal government and with health ministries in more than 45 developing countries. He also established for DoD the first systematic evi- dence-based epidemiologic program for the development and evaluation of physical and psychological standards to enter the military. Dr. Kelley has lectured in more than 20 countries and published more than 55 scholarly papers, book chapters, and monographs. He also served as the specialty editor for the two-volume textbook Military Preventive Medicine: Mobili- zation and Deployment. Dr. Kelley obtained his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Dr.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Etienne Krug, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of the Department for Injuries and Violence Prevention at the World Health Organisation in Geneva,

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2 APPENDIX D Switzerland. He coordinated the development of WHO’s first World Report . on Violence and Health published in 2002 and oversaw preparations for World Health Day 2004, dedicated to road safety, as well as the First United Nations Road Safety Week held in 2007. He chairs the International Organizing Committee for World Conferences on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion and the United Nations Road Safety Collaboration. From July 1995 to December 1999, Dr. Krug was a medical epidemiologist in the Division of Violence Prevention at the CDC in Atlanta. Between 1987 and 1995, Dr. Krug worked in war-torn countries such as Mozambique, Nicaragua, and El Salvador for Médecins sans Frontières; served as health and nutrition coordinator for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees during the Rwandan genocide; and served as human rights observer in Haiti for the United Nations. Dr. Krug holds a degree of medical doctor from the University of Louvain in Brussels, Belgium, and a master’s degree in public health from Harvard University. He has earned several awards. He is editor of several scientific journals and has published many original articles, editorials, and chapters. He is fluent in French, English, Dutch, Spanish, and Portuguese. Elsie Le Franc, Ph.D., is professor emeritus and adjunct professor in the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies (SALISES) at the University of the West Indies. She was previously the director of SALISES. Her major areas of interest, in which she has conducted extensive basic and policy-oriented research, are health services research; health inequalities; quality of care; health reform; reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, violence and injury (including domestic violence) as public health problems; and health, poverty, and social exclusion. In the conduct of her research she has also frequently collaborated with researchers from the United States and the United Kingdom. She has worked in the Caribbean and Africa and has consulted widely for international agencies such as WHO, PAHO, UNICEF, DFID, UNDP, IDB, and USAID with particular emphasis on social policy analysis and development and health policy development. She continues to teach courses on social policy analysis and social investment and manage- ment at the University of the West Indies. Stephen Lewis was the UN Secretary-General’s special envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa from June 2001 until the end of 2006. From 1995 to 1999, Mr. Lewis was deputy executive director of UNICEF at the organization’s global headquarters in New York. From 1984 through 1988, Stephen Lewis was Canada’s ambassador to the United Nations. Mr. Stephen Lewis is a professor in global health, Faculty of Social Sciences at McMaster Univer- sity. He is co-director of AIDS-Free World, a new international AIDS advo- cacy organization, and he is the chair of the board of the Stephen Lewis

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22 APPENDIX D Foundation in Canada. Mr. Lewis holds 25 honorary degrees from Cana- dian universities and is a Companion of the Order of Canada, Canada’s highest honour for lifetime achievement. Bernice van Bronkhorst, M.Sc., is an urban specialist in the Sustainable Development Group in the Latin America and Caribbean region in the World Bank. She did her undergraduate and graduate work at the London School of Economics. Her analytical and operational work focuses on social development issues in urban development. She has worked in the area of violence prevention in the Latin America and Caribbean region since 1998, with an emphasis on integrated municipal crime and violence prevention programs as well as community-based crime and violence pre- vention approaches. In addition to working on the World Bank’s analytical agenda in this area, which includes recent reports on crime and violence and economic development in Brazil and in the Caribbean, she also works on urban operations—piloting the integration of crime and violence preven- tion activities into integrated slum upgrading projects in Brazil, Honduras, Jamaica, Colombia, and Haiti. She also designed and is managing a region- wide municipal capacity-building program in urban crime and violence prevention and a Small Grants Program and Impact Evaluation initiative for community-based crime and violence prevention initiatives in Honduras and Nicaragua. Irvin Waller, Ph.D., is a full professor of criminology and director of the Institute for the Prevention of Crime at the University of Ottawa. His latest book, Less Law, More Order (2006), sets out methods to reduce crime and empower victims of crime, including legislation for political leaders to achieve those goals. Dr. Waller was the founding executive director of the International Centre for the Prevention of Crime affiliated with the United Nations (UN). He developed the Safer Cities program with United Nations Habitat and has participated with the WHO in the implementation of the World Report on Violence and Health. He was a key adviser to the group of experts that prepared the UN Guidelines for the Prevention of Crime, accepted in 2002, and has worked on national commissions in Canada, South Africa, and the United States. Dr. Waller has been president and sec- retary general of the World Society of Victimology. He was on the Board of the International Bureau of Children’s Rights when it spearheaded the adoption of UN Guidelines on Justice for Child Victims and Witnesses in 2005. He has received awards from the U.S. National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA) for his work leading to the UN adoption of the Declaration on Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power, as well as his contributions to victim protection through research. He served as a senior official in the Ministry of the Solicitor General of

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2 APPENDIX D Canada in the 1970s to provide evidence to support the abolition of the death penalty and improve gun control, dangerous offender legislation, and prevention of violence against women. He has published extensively on victim issues, crime prevention, and correctional policy in English, French, and Spanish with translations in many other languages. He received his Ph.D. in criminology, as well as his M.A. in economics from the University of Cambridge in England. Elizabeth Ward, M.D., is a medical epidemiologist in the Jamaican govern- ment health system. She has coordinated research and data analysis and has been responsible for disease prevention and control. She spearheaded the development of the Jamaica Injury Surveillance System (JISS), which tracks hospital based injuries island-wide and is now linked to a geographic infor- mation system (Health GIS). Her work led to the establishment of the Vio- lence Prevention Alliance-Jamaica Chapter in 2004. The alliance comprises 35 members from government, nongovernmental, and international agen- cies and private sector organizations working together to find solutions to the problem of violence. Presentations have been made internationally and locally with a major focus on injury surveillance and prevention activities. As a member of the Task Force for the National Security Strategy, the Safe Schools Task Force, the working group for the security component of the National Development Plan, and the National Strategic Plan for Children and Violence, she contributes to national plans. Experienced in research and data analysis, she has published papers with a particular focus on the areas of crime and violence, HIV and sexually transmitted infections, and healthy lifestyles. Dr. Ward has received a certificate in health technology assessment from McGill University, a diploma in health economics from Aberdeen University, and a diploma in genitourinary medicine from the Society of Apothecaries. She has an M.Sc. in epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and an M.B.B.S. from the Uni- versity of the West Indies. She has also received a B.Sc. with honors from McGill University in food science-nutrition. Charlotte Watts, Ph.D., is the Sigrid Rausing Chair in Gender Violence and Health and heads the newly established research Centre on Gender, Vio- lence and Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has been conducting research on gender violence for the past 10 years, including as a senior staff member to the Intervention with Microfinance for AIDS and Gender Equity (IMAGE) in South Africa; core research team member for the WHO multicountry study on women’s health and domestic violence; research on the health impacts of the trafficking of women into sex work; and initiatives to integrate responses to violence into the health sector in low- and middle-income countries. Her research interests include

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2 APPENDIX D the international public health burden of gender violence; the linkages between violence against women and HIV/AIDS; ethical issues associated with conducting research on women’s experiences of violence; and methods to quantify the benefits associated with violence prevention. She has exten- sive fieldwork experience in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and has published widely on the issue of violence against women and HIV, including in Sci- ence, the Lancet, and the British Medical Journal. She is head of the Health Policy Unit at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and teaches Ph.D. and M.Sc. students. Gary Yates is president and chief executive officer of the California Wellness Foundation and serves as a member of the foundation’s board of direc- tors. He is also assistant clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Southern California, School of Medicine and is a licensed marriage and family therapist. Yates joined the foundation staff in 1992 after more than 20 years of experience in education and public health. Immediately prior to his association with the California Wellness Foundation, he was associ- ate director of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Yates received his undergraduate degree in government from American University in Washington, D.C., and his master’s degree in coun- seling psychology from the University of Northern Colorado. His primary area of interest and expertise is adolescent health, about which he has written and spoken extensively. Yates is actively involved in the leadership of numerous philanthropic, civic, and community organizations and cur- rently serves as treasurer of the board of Independent Sector. He previously served as vice chair of the board of the Council on Foundations and chair of the boards of Grantmakers in Health, the Foundation Consortium, and Southern California Grantmakers. In recognition of his civic leadership and work in the field of health and human services, Yates has received numerous awards and official commendations.