Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

ANTONIO J. BUSALACCHI, JR., Chair, is director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and a professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland. His research interests include tropical ocean circulation and its role in the coupled climate system, and climate variability and predictability. Dr. Busalacchi has been involved in the activities of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) for many years as co-chair of the scientific steering group for its subprogram on climate variability and predictability, and he currently is a member of the Joint Scientific Committee of the WCRP. Dr. Busalacchi has extensive NRC experience as a member of the Climate Research Committee, the Committee on Earth Studies, the Panel on the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Program, and the Panel on Ocean Atmosphere Observations Supporting Short-Term Climate Predictions.


PHILIP E. ARDANUY is chief scientist and director of Remote Sensing Applications at Raytheon Information Solutions. Dr. Ardanuy specializes in developing integrated mission concepts through government-industry-academic partnerships. His research has included network-centric and system-of-systems concepts, telepresence-telescience-telerobotics, tropical meteorology, Earth’s radiation budget and climate, satellite instrument calibration and characterization, remote sensing applications and systems engineering, scientific applications research-to-operational transition, and validation of environmental observations. He is the associate editor of the International Society for Optical Engineering’s (SPIE) Journal of Applied Remote Sensing and chair of the American Meteorological Society’s (AMS) Committee on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography. Dr. Ardanuy has received multiple honors, including his 2007 elevation to the position of Raytheon Engineering Fellow and his receipt of the Raytheon Excellence in Business Development Award and the Raytheon Peer Award for “dedication in the excellence in his work and unimagined expertise in algorithms, ground processing, mission understanding, and mission experience.” Dr. Ardanuy served on the NRC Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Benefits of the Committee for Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future, and on the Committee on Utilization of Environmental Satellite Data: A Vision for 2010 and Beyond.


JUDITH A. CURRY is chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include remote sensing, climate of the polar regions, atmospheric modeling, and air/sea interactions. She participates in the World Meteorological Organization’s World Climate Research Program, was a member of the Science Steering Group of the Arctic Climate System Program, and chairs the Global Energy



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Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members ANTONIO J. BUSALACCHI, JR., Chair, is director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and a professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland. His research interests include tropical ocean circulation and its role in the coupled climate system, and climate variability and predictability. Dr. Busalacchi has been involved in the activities of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) for many years as co-chair of the scientific steering group for its subprogram on climate variability and predict - ability, and he currently is a member of the Joint Scientific Committee of the WCRP. Dr. Busalacchi has extensive NRC experience as a member of the Climate Research Committee, the Committee on Earth Studies, the Panel on the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Program, and the Panel on Ocean Atmosphere Observations Supporting Short-Term Climate Predictions. PHILIP E. ARDANUY is chief scientist and director of Remote Sensing Applications at Raytheon Information Solutions. Dr. Ardanuy specializes in developing integrated mission concepts through government-industry- academic partnerships. His research has included network-centric and system-of-systems concepts, telepresence- telescience-telerobotics, tropical meteorology, Earth’s radiation budget and climate, satellite instrument calibration and characterization, remote sensing applications and systems engineering, scientific applications research- to-operational transition, and validation of environmental observations. He is the associate editor of the Inter- national Society for Optical Engineering’s (SPIE) Journal of Applied Remote Sensing and chair of the American Meteorological Society’s (AMS) Committee on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography. Dr. Ardanuy has received multiple honors, including his 2007 elevation to the position of Raytheon Engineering Fellow and his receipt of the Raytheon Excellence in Business Development Award and the Raytheon Peer Award for “dedication in the excellence in his work and unimagined expertise in algorithms, ground processing, mission understanding, and mission experience.” Dr. Ardanuy served on the NRC Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Benefits of the Committee for Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future, and on the Committee on Utilization of Environmental Satellite Data: A Vision for 2010 and Beyond. JUDITH A. CURRY is chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Tech - nology. Her research interests include remote sensing, climate of the polar regions, atmospheric modeling, and air/sea interactions. She participates in the World Meteorological Organization’s World Climate Research Program, was a member of the Science Steering Group of the Arctic Climate System Program, and chairs the Global Energy 0

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 APPENDIX E and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud System Studies Working Group on Polar Clouds. She co-chaired the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean program’s Science Working Group. Dr. Curry previously served on the NRC Committee to Review NASA’s Polar Geophysical Data Sets, the Panel on Coastal Meteorology, and the Climate Research Committee. She currently serves on the Space Studies Board. JUDITH L. LEAN has worked in the Naval Research Laboratory’s Space Science Division since 1986, where her research focuses on the mechanisms, measurements, and modeling of variations in the Sun’s radiative output and the effects of this variability on Earth’s global climate and space weather. She is a guest investigator on NASA’s Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and the Living with a Star and Sun-Earth Connection programs. She is a co- investigator on the Solar Radiation and Climate, Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics, and Solar Dynamics Explorer space missions. Dr. Lean has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation Subcommittee on Science, Technology and Space on the science of climate change. She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy, the American Astronomical Society-Solar Physics Division, and the American Meteorological Society. Dr. Lean served on the NRC Commit - tee on Radiative Forcing Effects on Climate, the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, and the Panel on Climate Variability and Change of the Committee for Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future. BERRIEN MOORE III is a professor of systems research at University of New Hampshire (UNH) and is executive director of Climate Central, Inc. He was director of UNH’s Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space from 1987 to early 2008. He stepped down as director of the Institute to direct Climate Central. Dr. Moore’s research focuses on the carbon cycle, global biogeochemical cycles, and global change as well as policy issues in the area of the global environment. At UNH, he received the university’s 1993 Excellence in Research Award and was named University Distinguished Professor in 1997. In 2005, he was honored with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Administrator’s Special Recognition award for his service as chair of the NOAA Research Review Team. Dr. Moore was the recipient of the 2007 Dryden Lectureship in Research by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Most recently, he shared in the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC); Dr. Moore was the coordinating lead author for the final chapter, “Advancing our Understanding,” of the IPCC’s Third Assessment Report (2001). He has served on several NASA advisory committees and in 1987 chaired the NASA Space and Earth Science Advisory Committee. Dr. Moore led the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) Task Force on Global Analysis, Interpretation, and Modeling prior to serving as chair of the overarching Scientific Committee of the IGBP. He chaired the 2001 Open Science Conference on Global Change in Amsterdam and is one of the four architects of the Amsterdam Declaration on Global Change. Dr. Moore has contributed actively to committees at the NRC, and he served as vice chair of the NRC Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future. He is chair of the Committee on Earth Studies and is a member of the Space Studies Board. JAY S. PEARLMAN is chief engineer of Network Centric Operations (NCO) Programs and Technologies at the Boeing Company. Dr. Pearlman’s background includes basic research program management and program development in sensors, remote sensing, and information systems. He was Boeing’s chief architect for the NOAA GOES-R study contract and the chief scientist for the Landsat Data Continuity contract. He was also deputy principal investigator for the NASA Hyperion Program. Dr. Pearlman is currently leading the NCO research and technology coordination and is a Boeing technical fellow. He is a senior member of the IEEE and is chair of the IEEE Committee on Earth Observation. He is active in promoting systems-of-systems architecture and informa - tion system development for large-scale national and global applications, including advancing ocean and coastal information systems. Dr. Pearlman has more than 70 publications and 25 U.S. and international patents. He served on the NRC Panel on Enabling Concepts and Technologies of the Committee for the Review of NASA’s Pioneering

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 OPTIONS TO ENSURE THE CLIMATE RECORD Revolutionary Technology Program and on the Steering Committee, Space Applications and Commercialization. He is currently a member of the Ocean Studies Board. JAMES F.W. PURDOM is a senior research scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) at Colorado State University. Before joining CIRA in 2001, he spent 4 years as director of the Office of Research and Applications in NOAA-NESDIS. Dr. Purdom’s research focuses on remote sensing of Earth and its environment from space, as well as the development and evolution of atmospheric convection, with emphasis on the study of mesoscale processes using satellite data. He received the U.S. Department of Commerce Silver Medal in 1994, the National Weather Association Special Award in 1996, the American Meteorological Society Special Award in 1997, and the Presidential Rank Award in 2001. He served on the NRC Task Group on the Availability and Usefulness of NASA’s Space Mission Data. CHRISTOPHER S. VELDEN is currently a research scientist at the University of Wisconsin. He heads a small group that develops satellite products mainly for tropical cyclone applications. He served as a member of the U.S. Weather Research Project Science Steering Committee (1996-1999), the GOES Science Team (1996-1998), and the Geostationary Microwave Sounder Working Group (1995-1996). He served as chair of the AMS Committee on Satellite Meteorology and has also been a member of the AMS Tropical Committee. In the last 5 years he has been honored by AMS with two awards, and he has published numerous papers. He served on the NRC Committee on NOAA-NESDIS Transition from Research to Operations, the Committee on the Future of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, and the Panel on Weather of the Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future. THOMAS H. VONDER HAAR is the director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere and University Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. His research includes work on Earth’s radiation budget and fundamental relationships with the climate system and incorporates some of the first results of direct solar irradiance measurements from satellites and the exchange of energy between Earth and space. Dr. Vonder Haar is also director of the Center for Geosciences, a Department of Defense-sponsored research center that focuses on the study of weather patterns and how they affect military operations, and includes investigations of fog, cloud layering, cloud drift winds, and dynamics of cloud persistence as detected from satel - lites. He currently serves on the NRC Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and was the vice chair of the Panel on Weather of the Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2003. FRANK J. WENTZ serves as director of Remote Sensing Systems, a research company specializing in satellite microwave remote sensing of Earth. His research focuses on radiative transfer models that relate satellite obser- vations to geophysical parameters, with the objective of providing reliable geophysical data sets to the Earth science community. He is currently working on satellite-derived decadal time series of atmospheric moisture and temperature, the measurement of sea surface temperature through clouds, and advanced microwave sensor designs for climatological studies. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union. Mr. Wentz served on the NRC Panel on Reconciling Temperature Observations of the Climate Research Committee, and he was a member of the Committee on Earth Studies.