Appendix C
Biographical Information: Committee on the Mississippi River and the Clean Water Act

DAVID A. DZOMBAK (chair) is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Environmental Engineering and faculty director of the Steinbrenner Institute for Environmental Education and Research at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on contaminant fate, transport, and treatment in water, soil, and sediment. Dr. Dzombak has published numerous articles in environmental engineering and science journals, book chapters, articles for the popular press, and two books. He serves on various national and regional committees, including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board (Environmental Engineering Committee), the EPA National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology (Environmental Technology Subcommittee), and the Southwestern Pennsylvania Regional Water Management Task Force. He is also an associate editor of the journal Environmental Science & Technology, a registered professional engineer in Pennsylvania, a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Dr. Dzombak holds a B.A. in mathematics from St. Vincent College, B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


H. H. CHENG is professor emeritus and former head of the Department of Soil, Water, and Climate at the University of Minnesota. He was formerly a faculty member at Washington State University for 24 years (1965-1989), having served as associate dean of the Graduate School, interim chair of the Department of Agronomy and Soils, and chair of the Interdisciplinary Program in Environmental Science and Regional Planning. He served as



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Appendix C Biographical Information: Committee on the Mississippi River and the Clean Water Act DAVID A. DZOMBAK (chair) is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Envi- ronmental Engineering and faculty director of the Steinbrenner Institute for Environmental Education and Research at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on contaminant fate, transport, and treatment in water, soil, and sediment. Dr. Dzombak has published numerous articles in envi- ronmental engineering and science journals, book chapters, articles for the popular press, and two books. He serves on various national and regional committees, including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board (Environmental Engineering Committee), the EPA National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology (Environmental Technology Subcommittee), and the Southwestern Pennsylvania Regional Water Management Task Force. He is also an associate editor of the journal Enironmental Science & Technology, a registered professional engineer in Pennsylvania, a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Dr. Dzombak holds a B.A. in mathematics from St. Vincent College, B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. H. H. CHENG is professor emeritus and former head of the Department of Soil, Water, and Climate at the University of Minnesota. He was formerly a faculty member at Washington State University for 24 years (1965-1989), having served as associate dean of the Graduate School, interim chair of the Department of Agronomy and Soils, and chair of the Interdisciplinary Program in Environmental Science and Regional Planning. He served as 

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 MISSISSIPPI RIVER WATER QUALITY AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT professor and head of the department at the University of Minnesota from 1989 to 2002. He is a licensed professional soil scientist and a fellow of the Soil Science Society of America, the American Society of Agronomy, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served as presi- dent of the Soil Science Society of America (1995-1996) and president of the American Society of Agronomy in 1999. His research interests include the chemistry, biochemistry, and analytical chemistry of soils; carbon and nitrogen cycles; transformation and transport of nitrogen, pesticides, and organic matter in the soil environment; crop residue management, nitrogen availability and use efficiency, and groundwater quality; residue and waste management; impact of climatic changes on carbon and nitrogen transfor- mation dynamics; and precision agriculture and agricultural sustainability. He currently is a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Dr. Cheng received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1961, and the University of Minnesota con- ferred upon him a LL.D. (Hon.) degree in 2004. ROBIN K. CRAIG is the Attorney’s Title Insurance Fund Professor of Law at the Florida State University College of Law, Tallahassee. Prior to joining the law school in the fall of 2006, Dr. Craig was an associate professor of law and professor of law at the Indiana University School of Law, Indianap- olis. She was a judicial clerk to Judge Robert E. Jones, U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon from 1996 to 1998, and also was a law clerk at the Oregon Department of Justice in the Natural Resources Section. Dr. Craig is active in the American Bar Association’s Section on Environment, Energy, and Resources, Administrative Law Section, and Ocean Policy Working Group. She has authored two books, The Clean Water Act and the Constitution (Environmental Law Institute, 2004) and an environmen- tal law textbook, Enironmental Law in Context (West, 2005). Professor Craig also has written numerous law articles on the Clean Water Act, ocean and coastal law, and law and science, as well as the “Oceans and Estuaries” chapter of Stumbling Toward Sustainability (Environmental Law Institute, 2002), a review of the U.S. progress toward sustainable use of natural re- sources. Dr. Craig received her B.A. from Pomona College, her M.A. from Johns Hopkins University, her Ph.D. from the University of California, and her J.D. degree from Lewis & Clark School of Law. OTTO C. DOERING III is a professor of agricultural economics at Purdue University. He is a public policy specialist and has served the U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture (USDA) working on the 1977 and 1990 Farm Bills. In 1997 he was the principal advisor to USDA’s Natural Resources Conserva- tion Service for implementing the 1996 Farm Bill and served again in 2005 assisting in conservation program design and implementation. From 1985

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 APPENDIX C to 1990 he was director of Indiana’s State Utility Forecasting Group. In 1999 he was team leader for the economic analysis of the White House’s National Hypoxia Assessment investigating the Dead Zone in the Gulf of Mexico. He serves on the EPA’s Scientific Advisory Board Committee on Integrated Nitrogen. He is also president of the American Agricultural Economics Association. His publications include a book on the 1996 Farm Act and a book on the effects of climate change and variability on agri- cultural production systems. Other recent publications focus on economic linkages driving the response to nitrogen overenrichment, the rationale for U.S. agricultural policy, and the integration of biomass into existing energy systems. Dr. Doering received his B.A. degree from Cornell University, his M.S. degree from the London School of Economics, and his Ph.D. degree from Cornell University. WILLIAM V. LUNEBURG, JR., is a professor of law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, where he teaches courses in environmental law, administrative law, civil procedure, and litigation with the federal govern- ment. He is the author of a variety of books, chapters, and articles dealing with issues of air and water pollution, among other topics. He developed his expertise in environmental law through his early work as an enforce- ment attorney with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Professor Luneburg has consulted with or represented local environmental groups in litigation dealing with air and water pollution problems and forest preser- vation. He was a member of the EPA’s Subcommittee on Ozone, Particulate Matter, and Regional Haze Implementation Programs that developed strat- egies to achieve the revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone and particulate matter adopted in 1997. For several years he was also a member of the Air Technical Advisory Committee of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Mr. Luneburg received his B.A. degree from Carleton College in political science and his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School. G. TRACY MEHAN III is a principal with the Cadmus Group in Arling- ton, Va. He previously served as assistant administrator for water at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 2001 to 2003; director of the Michigan Office of the Great Lakes and a member of the governor’s cabinet from 1993 to 2001; and associate deputy administrator of EPA in 1992. Prior to that, he served as director of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources from 1989 to 1992. At EPA, he was known for using innovative approaches to protect drinking water and water resources. He was a leader on ambient water quality monitoring, the watershed approach, and a new strategy to deal with aging infrastructure. Mr. Mehan is the recipient of the 2004 Environment Award from the Association of Metropolitan Sewerage

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 MISSISSIPPI RIVER WATER QUALITY AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT Agencies (AMSA) and the 2003 Elizabeth Jester Fellows Environmental Partnership Award from the Association of State and Interstate Water Pol- lution Control Administrators (ASIWPCA). Mr. Mehan is a member of the Missouri Bar. Mr. Mehan received both his B.A. degree in history and his J.D. degree from St. Louis University. JAMES B. PARK is the former chief of the Bureau of Water for the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, where he spent a 30-year career imple- menting the Clean Water Act. Mr. Park was active in national policy discus- sions with the EPA and the ASIWPCA. He represented Illinois in the Ohio River Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) and in the International Joint Commission for the Protection of the Great Lakes. He is a past chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Great Lakes Protection Fund, a trust estab- lished by the Great Lakes governors to fund research and other activities in the Great Lakes basin. He was also an active member of the Illinois River Coordinating Council, a group of state, federal, and citizen representatives responsible for developing action plans and policy initiatives for the Illinois River. Mr. Park received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in fluid mechanics from Southern Illinois University. NANCY N. RABALAIS is the executive director of the Louisiana Uni- versities Marine Consortium. Dr. Rabalais’ research interests include the dynamics of hypoxic waters, interactions of large rivers with the coastal ocean, eutrophication, and benthic ecology. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an Aldo Leopold Leadership Program fellow, a past president of the Estuarine Research Federation, a national associate of the National Academies of Science, a vice chair of the Scientific Steering Committee of Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone/International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, and a past chair of the NRC Ocean Studies Board. She is currently on external advisory panels for the National Sea Grant Program and the National Science Foundation Environmental Biology and Education Directorate. She has authored 3 books, 26 book chapters, and more than 80 peer-reviewed publications. She received the 2002 Bostwick H. Ketchum Award for coastal research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and shares the Blasker award with R. E. Turner. She received her B.S and M.S. degrees in biology from Texas A&I University and her Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Texas. JERALD L. SCHNOOR (NAE) is the Allen S. Henry Chair Professor in Engineering, professor in civil and environmental engineering; professor in occupational and environmental health, the College of Public Health; and co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research

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 APPENDIX C at the University of Iowa. Dr. Schnoor is a member of the National Acad- emy of Engineering and a registered professional engineer. His research interests are in mathematical modeling of water quality, phytoremediation, and global change. He has research projects on the design of environmental observatories, carbon sequestration to mitigate global warming, phytoreme- diation of hazardous wastes, and exposure risk assessment modeling. Dr. Schnoor is also editor-in-chief of the journal Enironmental Science and Technology, co-editor of the John Wiley series of texts and monographs in Enironmental Science & Technology, and a member of the EPA Science Advisory Board. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Iowa State University, his M.S. in environmental health engineering from the University of Texas, and his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Texas. DAVID M. SOBALLE is a research biologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He has conducted more than 25 years of research in limnology, water quality, and river and reservoir ecology and has held research posi- tions with state, federal, and academic institutions. Dr. Soballe has exten- sive experience working in interagency groups on water quality monitoring, data acquisition, and environmental management and restoration. He has expertise in the requirements and difficulties of monitoring a large flood- plain river and in using monitoring data to guide management decisions. Dr. Soballe played a major role in redesigning and implementing the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program on the Upper Mississippi River, and for 12 years, 1991 through 2003, he led the water quality component of the Upper Mississippi River Environmental Management Program at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Science Center in La Crosse, Wisconsin. He received his B.S. in biology in 1972 from the University of Notre Dame, his M.S. in biological sciences in 1978 from Michigan Technological Uni- versity, and his Ph.D. in animal ecology (limnology) in 1981 from Iowa State University. EDWARD L. THACKSTON is a professor of civil and environmental en- gineering, emeritus, at Vanderbilt University. His research interests include water quality in streams and reservoirs, mining and reaeration in streams, disposal of polluted dredged material, bacterial source tracking, and envi- ronmental law and policy. He taught water and waste treatment, water sup- ply, wastewater collection, water quality management, and environmental law at Vanderbilt from 1965 through 2000, except for 1972-1973, when he was on leave to serve as staff assistant for environmental affairs to Ten- nessee Governor Winfield Dunn, for which he was named Tennessee Con- servationist of the Year. From 1980 through 1999, he was chairman of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Vanderbilt. In 2001,

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 MISSISSIPPI RIVER WATER QUALITY AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT he won the Landmark Paper Award from the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors and was named Middle Tennessee En- gineer of the Year by the Tennessee Society of Professional Engineers. Dr. Thackston received his B.E. in civil engineering from Vanderbilt University, his M.S. in sanitary engineering from the University of Illinois, and his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Vanderbilt University. STANLEY W. TRIMBLE is a professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests are conservation, hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, research techniques, and environmental history. He has been visiting professor at the Universities of Chicago, Vienna, Oxford, and London (University College) and was a research hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey from 1973 to 1984. Dr. Trimble has conducted field-based studies of geomorphology and sediment transport and storage issues in the Upper Mississippi River basin since the 1970s. His current field work includes investigations of these issues along the Mississippi River at Pool 8 near La Crosse, Wisconsin. Dr. Trimble has served on com- mittees of the NRC, American Society of Civil Engineers, Association of American Geographers, and American Society for Testing and Materials. He is editor of the Dekker Encyclopedia of Water Science and joint editor- in-chief of Catena, an Elsevier journal of soils, hydrology, and landscape ecology. He is coauthor of the textbook Enironmental Hydrology. In 2006, Dr. Trimble received the Mel Marcus Distinguished Career Award from the Geomorphology Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers. Since 1978, he has owned and managed a 200-acre farm in Tennessee. Dr. Trimble received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of North Alabama and his M.S. and Ph.D. in geography from the University of Georgia. ALAN H. VICORY, JR., is the executive director and chief engineer of the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission, an interstate compact water pollution control agency created to abate interstate water pollution in the Ohio Valley. After initial employment with Greeley & Hansen Engi- neers, where he was involved in water and wastewater studies and designs, Mr. Vicory joined the staff of ORSANCO, where he was appointed execu- tive director and chief engineer in 1987. Mr. Vicory is a licensed profes- sional engineer and is board certified in the area of water and wastewater by the American Academy of Environmental Engineers (AAEE). He is a past president of AEEE, a former chairman of the International Water Association’s Watershed and River Basin Management Specialist Group, and past president of the Association of State and Interstate Water Pollution Control Administrators. Mr. Vicory received his B.S. in civil engineering from Virginia Military Institute in 1974.

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 APPENDIX C STAFF JEFFREY W. JACOBS is a senior program officer at the NRC’s Water Sci- ence and Technology Board. Dr. Jacobs’ research interests include policy and organizational arrangements for water resources management and the use of scientific information in water resources decision making. He has studied these issues extensively both in the United States and in mainland Southeast Asia. Prior to joining the NRC he served as a faculty member at the National University of Singapore and at Texas A&M University. Since joining the NRC in 1997, Dr. Jacobs has served as the study director for 20 NRC reports. He received his B.S. degree from Texas A&M University, his M.A. degree from the University of California, Riverside, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Colorado.

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