Appendix D
Biographical Sketches Committee on Integrated Observations for Hydrologic and Related Sciences

KENNETH W. POTTER, Chair, is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His teaching and research interests are in hydrology and water resources, including hydrologic modeling, estimation of hydrologic risk, estimation of hydrologic budgets, watershed monitoring and assessment, and hydrologic restoration. Dr. Potter is a past member of the Water Science and Technology Board and has served on many of its committees. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Geophysical Union. He received his B.S. in geology from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University.


ERIC F. WOOD, Vice Chair, is a professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Operations Research, Water Resources Program, at Princeton University. His areas of interest include hydroclimatology with an emphasis on land-atmosphere interaction, hydrologic impact of climate change, stochastic hydrology, hydrologic forecasting, and rainfall-runoff modeling. Dr. Wood is an associate editor for Reviews of Geophysics, Applied Mathematics and Computation: Modeling the Environment, and Journal of Forecasting. He is a member of the Climate Research Committee and the Panel on Climate Change Feedbacks. He is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board and Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate’s Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment panel. Dr. Wood received an Sc.D. in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1974.


ROGER C. BALES joined the University of California (UC), Merced, as professor of engineering in June 2003, and is one of UC Merced’s inaugural faculty.



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Appendix D Biographical Sketches Committee on Integrated Observations for Hydrologic and Related Sciences KENNETH W. POTTER, Chair, is a professor of civil and environmental en- gineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His teaching and research interests are in hydrology and water resources, including hydrologic modeling, estimation of hydrologic risk, estimation of hydrologic budgets, watershed monitoring and assessment, and hydrologic restoration. Dr. Potter is a past member of the Water Science and Technology Board and has served on many of its committees. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science and the American Geophysical Union. He received his B.S. in geology from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. in geography and envi- ronmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. ERIC F. WOOD, Vice Chair, is a professor in the Department of Civil Engi- neering and Operations Research, Water Resources Program, at Princeton Uni- versity. His areas of interest include hydroclimatology with an emphasis on land-atmosphere interaction, hydrologic impact of climate change, stochastic hydrology, hydrologic forecasting, and rainfall-runoff modeling. Dr. Wood is an associate editor for Reviews of Geophysics, Applied Mathematics and Computa- tion: Modeling the Environment, and Journal of Forecasting. He is a member of the Climate Research Committee and the Panel on Climate Change Feedbacks. He is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board and Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate’s Global Energy and Water Cycle Experi- ment panel. Dr. Wood received an Sc.D. in civil engineering from Massachu- setts Institute of Technology in 1974. ROGER C. BALES joined the University of California (UC), Merced, as pro- fessor of engineering in June 2003, and is one of UC Merced’s inaugural faculty. 193

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194 Appendix D Dr. Bales received his B.S. from Purdue University in 1974, an M.S. from the UC, Berkeley in 1975, and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology in 1985. He worked as a consulting engineer from 1975 to 1980, and was pro- fessor of hydrology and water resources at the University of Arizona from 1984- 2003. He has published extensively in diverse fields of research including snow hydrology, alpine hydrology and biogeochemistry, polar snow and ice, contami- nant hydrology, and water quality. At the University of Arizona Dr. Bales served as director of the NASA-supported Regional Earth Science Applications Center (RESAC), deputy director of the NSF-supported Science and Technology Center on Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA), and principal investigator on the NOAA-supported Climate Assessment for the Southwest Project (CLIMAS). He is actively involved in research in the south- western United States, Greenland, and Antarctica. Dr. Bales is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), of the Ameri- can Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Meteorological Society (AMS). He serves on a number of advisory committees and professional society boards. LAWRENCE E. BAND is chair and Voit Gilmore Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of North Carolina. He received a B.A. in geogra- phy from the State University of New York at Buffalo, summa cum laude, in 1977, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in geography from the University of California, Los Angeles, the latter in 1983. His research interests are watershed hydrology, ecology, geomorphology, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sens- ing, structure, function, and dynamics of watershed systems. Dr. Band combines field measurement and observation of hydrological and ecological variables with development and application of distributed simulation models, GIS, and remote sensing techniques. His projects are particularly concerned with the integration and coupling between water, carbon, and nutrient cycling and transport with watersheds, and the interactions of human behavior as part of watershed ecosys- tems. He is chair of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science Committee on Hydrologic Observatories. ELFATIH A. B. ELTAHIR is a professor in the Department of Civil and Envi- ronmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Eltahir received the Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineer- ing. He was nominated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for the honor based on his work in hydroclimatology. The award cites Professor Eltahir’s “outstanding accomplishment in hydrology and hydroclimatology by combining theory and remote sensing observations to better understand the links between the biosphere and the atmosphere and their implications for regional water resources in the tropics.” He is a past member of the executive committee of the hydrology section of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). He was also editor of Geophysical Research Letters from 1998 to 2001. Dr. Eltahir re-

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Appendix D 195 ceived a B.S. in 1985 from University of Khartoum, an M.S. in 1988 from Na- tional University of Ireland, and an S.M. and an Sc.D. from MIT, both in 1993. ANTHONY W. ENGLAND is associate dean of the College of Engineering and professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. Dr. England’s research interests are development and field calibra- tion of Land Surface Process (LSP) models of land-atmosphere energy and moisture fluxes for northern prairie and Arctic tundra, assimilation of satellite microwave brightness data for improved estimates of moisture profiles in prairie and Arctic soils and snow, and development of microwave radiometers for use on towers, aircraft, and satellites. He is a geophysicist by training. Dr. England received a B.S. in earth sciences from MIT in 1965, an M.S. in geology and geophysics from MIT in 1965, and a Ph.D. in geophysics from MIT in 1970. JAMES S. FAMIGLIETTI is an associate professor of Earth System Science at the University of California, Irvine. He holds a B.S. in geology from Tufts University, an M.S. in hydrology from the University of Arizona, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Princeton University. Major areas of cur- rent service are as an editor for Geophysical Research Letters, as co-chair of the AGU Hydrology Section Remote Sensing committee, and as the Graduate Advi- sor for Earth System Science. His research concerns the role of hydrology in the coupled Earth system. Areas of current activity include hydrologic and climate system modeling for studies of land-ocean-atmosphere interaction, satellite re- mote sensing of soil moisture and terrestrial water storage, soil moisture vari- ability and scaling, and global change impacts on water resources and hydrol- ogy-vegetation interaction. KONSTANTINE P. GEORGAKAKOS is the managing director of the Hydro- logic Research Center in San Diego, California. He is also an adjunct full pro- fessor with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of Califor- nia, San Diego, and an adjunct full professor with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the University of Iowa. Previously, he was an associate professor at the University of Iowa and with the Iowa Institute of Hy- draulic Research, as well as a research hydrologist with the National Weather Service. He holds M.S. and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Honors and awards include the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation and the NRC-NOAA Associate- ship Award from the National Research Council. He has authored or co- authored more than 100 refereed publications in the areas of hydrology, hydro- meteorology, and hydroclimatology. As part of the science cooperation and technology transfer activities of the Hydrologic Research Center, he led the de- sign and implementation of an operational multispectral satellite rainfall estima- tion system for the Nile River Basin, the operational hydrologic forecast system for Peru, a prototype integrated climate-hydrology-reservoir forecast-manage-

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196 Appendix D ment system for the water resources of northern California, and the regional operational flash flood warning system for the seven countries of Central Amer- ica. He is a consultant for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organiza- tion, and he has been associate editor of the American Society of Civil Engi- neers’ Journal of Engineering Hydrology, the Journal of Hydrology and Ad- vances in Water Resources. He serves as the U.S. Expert in Hydrologic Model- ing for the World Meteorological Organization Commission for Hydrology (Working Group on Applications). DINA L. LOPEZ is an associate professor of geology at Ohio University. Dr. Lopez’s research interests include acid-mine drainage and its impact on the re- ceiving waters; geochemistry and hydrogeology of hydrothermal systems and lakes affected by volcanic and anthropogenic inputs in Central America; diffuse soil degassing in volcanic areas, including the flux of CO2 and radon; and mod- eling of the coupled fluid flow and heat transfer in geological systems. She has received numerous international fellowships, and multiple outstanding teaching awards at Ohio University. Dr. Lopez received a B.Sc in chemistry from the University of El Salvador in 1975, a M.Sc. in physics from Virginia Tech in 1979, and a Ph.D. in geology from Louisiana State University in 1992. Before working at Ohio University, she held a postdoctoral fellowship in hydrogeology at the University of British Columbia. DANIEL P. LOUCKS works in the application of systems analysis, economic theory, ecology and environmental engineering to problems in regional devel- opment and environmental quality management including air, land, and water resource systems. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineers. At Cornell University, he served as chair of the Department of Civil and Environ- mental Engineering from 1974 to 1980, and as associate dean for research and graduate studies in the College of Engineering from 1980 to 1981. Since 1969 he has served as a consultant to private and government agencies and various organizations of the United Nations, the World Bank, and North Atlanta Treaty Organization on regional water resources development planning throughout the world. He has served on various committees of the NRC, including the Interna- tional Institute for Applied Systems Analysis liaison committee and, most re- cently, the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. The Secretary of the Army appointed him to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Envi- ronmental Advisory Board in 1994. He served as vice chair and chair from 1995 to 1998, and received the Commander’s Award for Public Service in 1998. Dr. Loucks received his M.F. in forestry from Yale University and his Ph.D. in envi- ronmental engineering from Cornell University. PATRICIA A. MAURICE is a professor of civil engineering and geological sciences at the University of Notre Dame and is director of the university’s in- terdisciplinary Center for Environmental Science and Technology. Dr. Maurice’s-

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Appendix D 197 research focuses on microbial, trace metal, and organic interactions with mineral surfaces from the atomic scale up to the scale of entire watersheds. Her research encompasses the hydrology and biogeochemistry of freshwater wetlands and mineral-water interactions, the remediation of metal contamination, and global climate change. Dr. Maurice received her Ph.D. in aqueous and surface geo- chemistry from Stanford University. LEAL A. K. MERTES was a professor of geography at the University of Cali- fornia, Santa Barbara. She was an interdisciplinary scientist with B.S. degrees in both geology and biology from Stanford University and M.S. and Ph.D. de- grees in geology from the University of Washington. Her research investigated the geomorphic and hydrologic processes responsible for the development of wetlands and floodplains in large river systems and across watersheds and to develop remote sensing techniques for analysis of wetlands and water proper- ties. Dr. Mertes’ research also included the study of large rivers and the use of digital data for analysis of ecosystem dynamics. She taught courses on digital image processing of remote sensing data and rivers. For the National Acad- emies she served on the Committee to the International Contributions for Scien- tific, Educational and Cultural Activities (ICSECA) Program, the Committee on International Organizations and Programs, and the International Advisory Board. Dr. Mertes held memberships in the Geological Society of America and the American Geophysical Union. She received her Ph.D. in geological sciences from the University of Washington. She died on September 30, 2005. WILLIAM K. MICHENER is associate director of the Long Term Ecological Research Network Office in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico. His activities include network coordination, informatics research, and international training. He served as program director of ecology in the Division of Biological Sciences at the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 1999- 2000. At NSF, he served as senior biological sciences program officer in the Biocomplexity Working Group, and participated in numerous cross-disciplinary and interagency initiatives. His research interests include the ecology of natural and anthropogenic disturbances, and ecological informatics. He has published three books dealing with ecological informatics and more than 70 journal arti- cles and book chapters. He is co-director of the Project Office and chair of the Facilities & Infrastructure Committee for the proposed National Ecological Ob- servatory Network (NEON). BRIDGET R. SCANLON is a senior research scientist in the Bureau of Eco- nomic Geology and also teaches courses in the geology and civil engineering departments at the University of Texas at Austin. Her expertise lies in unsatu- rated zone hydrology, soil physics, environmental tracers, and numerical simula- tions to quantify subsurface flow in arid regions. She served on the NRC Com- mittee on Ward Valley. She has served as a consultant to the Nuclear Waste

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198 Appendix D Technical Review Board and associate editor for Hydrogeology Journal. She regularly gives short courses on methods of estimating rates of groundwater recharge. Dr. Scanlon received her Ph.D. in geology at the University of Ken- tucky.