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References Addington, L. A. (2005). Disentangling the effects of bounding and mobility on reports of criminal victimization. Journal of Quantitative Criminology 21(3), 321– 343. Addington, L. A. (2007). Using NIBRS to study methodological sources of divergence between the UCR and NCVS. See Lynch and Addington (2007), Chapter 8. Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center (2002, February). Measuring Adult Victim- ization in Alaska: Technical Report. Report for the Bureau of Justice Statistics. JC 20 | 0109.011. Anchorage: Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage. Anderson, D. A. (1999). The aggregate burden of crime. Journal of Law and Eco- nomics 42(611). Atrostic, B., N. Bates, G. Burt, and A. Silberstein (2001). Nonresponse in U.S. gov- ernment household surveys: Consistent measures, recent trends, and new insights. Journal of Official Statistics 17(2), 209–226. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006, April). Crime and Safety, Australia—2005. Release 4509.0. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics. Bachman, R., H. Dillaway, and M. S. Lachs (1998). Violence against the elderly: A comparative analysis of robbery and assault across age and gender groups. Re- search on Aging 20(2), 183–198. Bachman, R., L. E. Saltzman, M. P. Thompson, and D. C. Carmody (2002). Dis- entangling the effects of self-protective behaviors on the risk of injury in assaults against women. Journal of Quantitative Criminology 18(2), 135–157. Bachman, R. and B. M. Taylor (1994). The measurement of family violence and rape by the redesigned National Crime Victimization Survey. Justice Quarterly 11, 499–512. 127

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