Recommendation 4.2: Changing from a 6-month reference period to a 12-month reference period has the potential for improving the precision per-unit cost in the NCVS framework, but the extent of loss of measurement quality is not clear from existing research based on the post-1992-redesign NCVS instrument. BJS should sponsor additional research—involving both experimentation as well as analysis of the timing of events in extant data—to inform this trade-off.


Recommendation 4.3: BJS should make supplements a regular feature of the NCVS. Procedures should be developed for soliciting ideas for supplements from outside BJS and for evaluating these supplements for inclusion in the survey.


Recommendation 4.4: BJS should maintain the core set of screening questions in the NCVS but should consider streamlining the incident form (either by eliminating items or by changing their periodicity).


Recommendation 4.5: BJS should investigate the use of modeling NCVS data to construct and disseminate subnational estimates of major crime and victimization rates.


Recommendation 4.6: BJS should develop, promote, and coordinate subnational victimization surveys through formula grants funded from state-local assistance resources.


Recommendation 4.7: BJS should investigate changing the sample design to increase efficiency, thus allowing more precision for a given cost. Changes to investigate include:

  1. changing the number or nature of the first-stage sampling units;

  2. changing the stratification of the primary sampling units;

  3. changing the stratification of housing units;

  4. selecting housing units with unequal probabilities, so that probabilities are higher where victimization rates are higher; and

  5. alternative person-level sampling schemes (sampling or subsampling persons within housing units).

Recommendation 4.8: BJS should investigate the introduction of mixed mode data collection designs (including self-administered modes) into the NCVS.



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