Appendix F
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

LT. COL. Sonya Corum, M.B.A., is currently serving as Director of the Experimentation and Analysis Element at the U.S. Army Training Center, Fort Jackson, South Carolina. She graduated with a B.S. in Food and Nutrition from Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, in 1988. Her first assignment after completing the Dietetic Internship at Brooke Army Medical Center was at Ireland Army Community Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky, as the Chief, Clinical Dietetics. Since that time, Lieutenant Colonel Corum has held a number of positions in medical treatment facilities including Chief, Production and Service at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, and Chief, Nutrition Care at Fort Campbell. She also deployed with the 86th Combat Support Hospital in support of Hurricane Mitch relief. She has served as the Executive Fellow to the Chief, Medical Specialist Corps. Lieutenant Colonel Corum was the Nutrition Staff Officer at the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USA-CHPPM) where she spearheaded the Army’s Dietary Supplement Education Campaign. She also deployed with the 31st Combat Support Hospital in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Lieutenant Colonel Corum received an M.B.A. from the University of Texas, El Paso, and is a Command and General Staff College graduate.


Gerald J. Dal Pan, M.D., M.H.S., is the Director of the Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (FDA/CDER). Prior to that, he was the Director of the Division of Surveillance, Research, and Communication Support in CDER’s Office of Drug Safety, a position he had held since



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 435
Appendix F Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers LT. COL. Sonya Corum, M.B.A., is currently serving as Director of the Ex- perimentation and Analysis Element at the U.S. Army Training Center, Fort Jackson, South Carolina. She graduated with a B.S. in Food and Nutrition from Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, in 1988. Her first assignment after completing the Dietetic Internship at Brooke Army Medical Center was at Ireland Army Community Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky, as the Chief, Clinical Dietetics. Since that time, Lieutenant Colo- nel Corum has held a number of positions in medical treatment facilities including Chief, Production and Service at William Beaumont Army Medi- cal Center, and Chief, Nutrition Care at Fort Campbell. She also deployed with the 86th Combat Support Hospital in support of Hurricane Mitch relief. She has served as the Executive Fellow to the Chief, Medical Special- ist Corps. Lieutenant Colonel Corum was the Nutrition Staff Officer at the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USA- CHPPM) where she spearheaded the Army’s Dietary Supplement Education Campaign. She also deployed with the 31st Combat Support Hospital in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Lieutenant Colonel Corum received an M.B.A. from the University of Texas, El Paso, and is a Command and General Staff College graduate. Gerald J. Dal Pan, M.D., M.H.S., is the Director of the Office of Surveil- lance and Epidemiology in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (FDA/CDER). Prior to that, he was the Director of the Division of Surveillance, Research, and Communication Support in CDER’s Office of Drug Safety, a position he had held since 

OCR for page 435
 USE OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS BY MILITARY PERSONNEL December 2003. He received his medical degree from Columbia University, and his master’s degree in clinical epidemiology from Johns Hopkins Uni- versity. He trained in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and in neurology at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is board certified in internal medicine and neurology. Dr. Dal Pan was an instructor in the Neurology Department at Johns Hopkins University. He next worked for Guilford Pharmaceuticals in Baltimore, and then for HHI Clinical Re- search and Statistical Services in Hunt Valley, Maryland. He joined the FDA in July 2000 as a medical officer in the Division of Anesthetic, Critical Care, and Addiction Drug Products. Vasilios Frankos, Ph.D., serves as the Director, Division of Dietary Supple- ment Programs (DDSP) and the lead scientist for dietary supplements for the FDA and is responsible for the full implementation of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994. He directs and coordi- nates policy and administrative activities within the division. He advises on policy and management issues on dietary supplement programs, new dietary ingredient safety assessments, good manufacturing practice, and adverse reaction monitoring, and related activities pertaining to dietary sup- plements. Before becoming the Director of DDSP, Dr. Frankos also served as Special Assistant for Dietary Supplement Science Review providing toxi- cological and pharmacological evaluation of data used to assess the risks posed by dietary supplement products, Staff Science Advisor in the Office of the Commissioner, and as a Senior Toxicologist in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. Dr. Frankos received his M.S. in molecular biology from the University of Maryland and his Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Maryland Pharmacy School. He has over 30 years’ experience in the toxicological and pharmacological evalua- tion of data used to assess the safety of FDA-regulated products. In addition to his FDA activities, he spent 18 years as a principal in the consulting firm ENVIRON International Corp. Steve French, M.B.A., is the Managing Partner of the Natural Marketing Institute, with over 25 years of strategic marketing, business development, market research, and management experience. Complementing a B.S. and M.B.A. in marketing, Mr. French has accumulated extensive insight and knowledge into health, wellness, environmentalism, and social responsibil- ity. He has unparalleled experience across a wide range of corporate busi- ness functions and has pioneered a range of consumer research databases. Mr. French is a frequent speaker at many industry events and conferences, and is regularly utilized by television, radio, magazine, newspaper, Inter- net, and other media sources. He is also an author of numerous published articles and written research reports used across many industries.

OCR for page 435
 APPENDIX F Paula Gardiner, M.D., M.P.H., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at Boston University Medical School. She is a former Research Fellow at the Division for Research and Education in Complemen- tary and Integrative Medical Therapies, Osher Institute, Harvard Medical School. Her research focuses on use of dietary supplements by adults and adolescents in the U.S. population. Additionally, her research has focused on the safety issues surrounding dietary supplements, such as prescription medication and dietary supplement interactions and adverse event report- ing. As a member of the United States Pharmacopeia’s Dietary Supplements Expert Committee, she has focused on improving adverse event reporting in the United States. Mary Hardy, M.D., serves as the Codirector of the Integrative Medicine Health and Wellness Program at the Venice Family Clinic, the largest free clinic in the United States. Her clinical practice now involves educating cancer patients in integrative therapies at the Ted Mann Family Integrative Oncology Program at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her current research interests include reviewing the evidence for the safety and efficacy of natural therapies, especially botanicals. Dr. Hardy is board certified in internal medicine and a specialist in botanical and integrative medicine and has actively combined complementary and alternative therapies with traditional Western medicine for many years. A graduate of Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans, Dr. Hardy completed her internal medicine residency at the Tufts New England Medical Center be- fore studying medical ethics at Harvard Divinity School and Loma Linda University. She completed advanced training in botanical medicine at the Institute for Medical Herbalism and has studied with practitioners in Peru, Kenya, South Africa, and China. She is the complementary and alterna- tive medicine expert for a number of research projects conducted by the Southern California Evidence-Based Practice Center of the RAND Corpo- ration. In addition, she has expanded her interest in botanical research by serving for two and a half years as the Associate Director of the Botanical Research Center of the University of California, Los Angeles, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Hardy also serves on the scientific advisory board of the American Botanical Council and the editorial boards of Alternatie Medicine Alert, Alternatie Therapies in Women’s Health, Eidence-Based Complementary and Alternatie Medicine, FACT as well as Phytomedicine. Dr. Hardy is recognized as an authority on integrative medicine and natural products by organizations such as the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, the California Medical Board, the American Medical Association, the American Pharmaceutical Association, CBS, NBC, Discov- ery Channel, and the Los Angeles Times. She is a founding member of the Advisory Council for the newly established Naturopathic Medicine Board

OCR for page 435
 USE OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS BY MILITARY PERSONNEL of California and has recently been appointed to the External Advisory Council for the Natural Product Directorate of the Canadian government. The multidisciplinary clinic she founded at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in the department of Medicine in 1998 allowed her to explore the practical and philosophical issues that both facilitate and impede the development of integrative medicine as a discipline. Contributing to the national develop- ment of integrative medicine, she serves as the cochairperson of the Clinical Practice Committee of the Academic Consortium of Integrative Medicine (an organization of the leading medical schools practicing and teaching in this area). Dr. Hardy recently completed a book for Reader’s Digest, Best Remedies, which focuses on integrative medicine. She is also conducting a review of the quality of research trials in herbal medicine and is finishing a systematic review on the effects of dietary supplements on coagulation for the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. LT. COL. Paul J. Hoerner is currently the Deputy Director of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Patient Safety Center (PSC). He directs the daily operations of the PSC, with a budget of $1.5 million, serving more than 576 DoD medical treatment facilities and 9.2 million beneficiaries worldwide. This includes quarterly, annual, and bimonthly publications, safety alerts, and focused analysis for use by DoD, Army, Navy, and Air Force facilities to improve patient safety. Arriving at the PSC in September 2006, he had recently completed a 1-year fellowship at a medial malpractice insurance company. Prior to that assignment, he was the Chief of Pharmacy Operations at David Grant Medical Center. The pharmacy processed over 3,500 outpatient prescriptions and prepared over 1,600 inpatient orders daily. He provided oversight of all aspects of the pharmacy’s various el- ements (clinical, support, inpatient, and outpatient). Colonel Hoerner’s career goals are to advance his leadership capabilities and expertise in the fields of pharmacy and patient safety. LT. COL. Danny B. N. Jaghab has been the Nutrition Staff Officer for the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, since 2004. His work includes analyzing and assessing current policies and developing and implementing new health promotion and nutrition policies and regulations that better meet the needs of the DoD. He collaborates with federal and na- tional agencies on projects and initiatives as the sole subject-matter expert on nutrition for the U.S. Army. From July 2002 to July 2004, he directed the U.S. Military Dietetic Internship Consortium at the Brooke Army Medi- cal Center in San Antonio, Texas. He was also previously the Chief of the Nutrition Care Division at the DeWitt Army Community Hospital in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He was a Bronze Star Medal recipient during Operation

OCR for page 435
 APPENDIX F Desert Shield/Storm; recipient of the 2004 American Dietetic Association’s Media Excellence Award; recipient of the 2004 Department of Defense Patient Safety Award in the category of Technology; and was elected the 2006 Career Guidance Chair, American Dietetic Association’s National Organization of Men in Nutrition. He received his B.S. in nutrition and dietetics from Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and his M.S. in education and counseling from the Long Island University in West Point, New York. David Kaufman, Sc.D., is Professor of Epidemiology at the Boston Uni- versity School of Public Health. He obtained his B.A. in 1973 from Bethel College, North Newton, Kansas, and his M.S. in 1979 and Sc.D. in 1983 in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. In 1975, he joined the newly created Drug Epidemiology Unit (DEU) (subsequently renamed Slone Epidemiology Unit, and since 2001 the Slone Epidemiology Center) as a Research Associate. Dr. Kaufman was Assistant Director of the Slone Epidemiology Unit from 1986 to 1997, and has been Associate Director since 1998. His early career as an epidemiologist at the DEU was primar- ily spent in studies of drugs and other factors in relation to cancer, heart disease, and various other conditions. Together with Drs. Slone, Shapiro, and Lynn Rosenberg, he participated in the development of Case-Control Surveillance. In the 1980s, Dr. Kaufman was coinvestigator of the Interna- tional Agranulocytosis and Aplastic Anemia Study, a pioneering effort in the evaluation of these extremely rare but often drug-induced blood dys- crasias, that was conducted in seven countries with several hundred cases enrolled; he coauthored a book describing the results. He has since directed studies of aplastic anemia in Thailand and the United States and served as an adviser to a study of that disease in Brazil. The Thai study is the largest epidemiological investigation of aplastic anemia that has been conducted, with over 500 cases and 2,200 controls. Dr. Kaufman pursued his interest in rare drug-induced diseases as principal investigator of an international study of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis con- ducted in four countries in Europe, and a study of anaphylaxis conducted in Spain, Hungary, India, and Sweden. Other major activities have included an international study of analgesics in relation to upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and more recently, the National Analgesic Nephropathy Study, a multicenter study of end-stage renal disease patients in three regions of the United States. Dr. Kaufman worked closely with Allen Mitchell in the development of the Slone Survey, a U.S. population-based survey of medi- cation and dietary supplement use that was initiated in 1998; he is princi- pally responsible for the implementation of that project. Another current study is exploring the relationship of Oxalobacter formigenes, an oxalate- metabolizing bacterium found in the colons of about 70 percent of the

OCR for page 435
0 USE OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS BY MILITARY PERSONNEL normal population, and calcium oxalate kidney stones. Dr. Kaufman is also the Principal Investigator of recently launched national patient registries of multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes (Patient Registries at Slone: Myeloma and MDS). Rick Kingston, PharmD., is President, Regulatory and Scientific Affairs for SafetyCall International, a multidisciplinary medical practice and poison center focused on corporate postmarket surveillance and product safety for drugs, dietary supplements, and consumer products. He has a 28-year academic career, having attained the rank of full professor in the Depart- ment of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, and is currently serving as Clinical Professor of Pharmacy in the College of Pharmacy at the Univer- sity of Minnesota. At the University of Minnesota, he is course director for the didactic course “Therapeutics of Herbs and Other Natural Medicinals” taught in the College of Pharmacy and has previously served as a member of the University’s Center for Plants and Human Health and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine-funded integrative medicine Center for Spirituality and Healing. Previously, Dr. Kingston was cofounder and former Director of the Minnesota Regional Poison Center and its affiliated industry toxicology and product safety surveillance service programs at St. Paul-Ramsey Medical Center in St. Paul, Minnesota. Dr. Kingston completed his B.S. in Pharmacy at the University of New Mexico, his PharmD. in Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Minnesota, and a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical toxicology and pharmacokinetics at St. Paul-Ramsey Medical Center and the University of Minnesota. His 28-year professional experience has been centered in the areas of clinical toxicol- ogy and pharmacology, poison control, product postmarket surveillance, and drug and dietary supplement safety. His research and practice interests coincide with SafetyCall International initiatives for corporate clients and include a focus on injury prevention, the epidemiology of toxicology-related incident data, product safety and related regulatory affairs, and specific advances in the clinical management or triage of patients being treated or evaluated for drug, toxin, or consumer product exposures. Harris R. Lieberman, Ph.D., is a Research Psychologist in the Military Nutrition Division of the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) in Natick, Massachusetts. He is an internationally recognized expert in the area of nutrition and behavior and has published over 125 original, full-length papers in scientific journals and edited books. Dr. Lieberman received his Ph.D. in Physiological Psychology in 1977 from the University of Florida and then conducted postdoctoral research at the Department of Psychology and Brain Science at the Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology (MIT). From 1980 to 1990 he was on the staff at MIT, where he examined the effects of food constituents and drugs on human

OCR for page 435
 APPENDIX F behavior and brain function. In 1990 he joined the civilian research staff of USARIEM where he continued his work in nutrition, behavior, and stress. From 1994 to 2000 he was Chief or Deputy Chief of the Military Nutrition program at USARIEM. His recent research has addressed the effects of vari- ous nutritional factors, diets, and environmental stress on cognitive perfor- mance and brain function. He holds two patents for novel technologies to assess and enhance cognitive performance. He currently chairs his institute’s scientific research committee and serves on the DoD Dietary Supplements Committee and several other national and international committees. Bernadette M. Marriott, Ph.D., is Principal Associate and Senior Scientist at Abt Associates, and has 38 years of experience in the fields of nutrition, psychology, and comparative medicine, with expertise in diet, nutrition and chronic disease. Dr. Marriott has worked in scientific settings in the federal government, universities, and foundations. Her research has focused on nutrition and related behavioral studies, specifically diet and health research, and food labeling. She currently holds an adjunct full professor position in the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and has held previous academic positions of assistant through full professor. Other positions include Vice President for Science Integration, RTI International, Founding Director of the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, Deputy Director of the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Vice Provost for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies at Northern Arizona University, Vice President for Programs and Communications for the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, and Associate Director of the Caribbean Primate Research Center, University of Puerto Rico. While at the IOM, she oversaw the activities of the Com- mittee on Military Nutrition Research for 8 years and is very familiar with the nutrient requirements of active duty personnel, nutrient composition of ration packages, exercise, and weight management in the military services. At the IOM, she edited, helped write, and/or oversaw the production of 24 reports; of particular relevance to this study are Food Components to En- hance Performance (DoD) and Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Food Fortification, for which she was a special consultant and which addresses foods and dietary supplements. Dr. Marriott has extensive experi- ence managing complex programs, building consensus, and working with scientific data. She currently is principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects on adult and child intake, a corporate-funded project on infant feeding, an obesity study supported by the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and was the scientific lead for diet, exercise, weight management, and related health indicators on the 00 Department of Defense (DoD) Surey of Health Related Behaiors Among Military Personnel with Bob Bray. Prior to leaving RTI, she was principal investigator on the TRICARE Management Activity-funded Weight Management Demonstration Project:

OCR for page 435
 USE OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS BY MILITARY PERSONNEL Healthy Eating and Actie Liing in TRICARE Households (HEALTH). Bernadette Marriott has a B.Sc. in biology/immunology from Bucknell University, a Ph.D. in psychology from King’s College, Aberdeen, Scotland, and postgraduate training in trace mineral nutrition, comparative medicine, and advanced statistics. She has published extensively, is on a number of national committees, and is a frequent speaker on diet, dietary supplements, and health. Scott J. Montain, Ph.D., is a research physiologist working in the Military Nutrition Division at USARIEM, Natick, Massachusetts. Dr. Montain re- ceived an M.S. from Ball State University in 1984 and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1991 before completing postdoctoral training at USARIEM. He is author or coauthor of over 95 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and reports. Dr. Montain currently serves as Councilor for the Exercise and Environmental Physiology section of the American Physiological Society, and is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. LT. COL. Charity Thomasos, M.S., is currently stationed at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, as the Director of Nutritional Medicine Flight. She earned her B.S. in clinical nutrition/dietetics from West Virginia Wesleyan College, Buckhannon, West Virginia, and her M.S. in human nutrition/biochemistry from the Ohio State University, Columbus. She is a member of the Ameri- can Dietetic Association and the Nutrition and Complementary Medicine practice group. Lieutenant Colonel Thomasos is the Air Force Dietetics Representative to the DoD Dietary Supplement Committee and a member of the Special Operations Forces subcommittee. Andrew J. Young, Ph.D., is a research physiologist and Chief of the Military Nutrition Division at USARIEM in Natick, Massachusetts. He obtained a B.S. in biology at Virginia Military Institute and a Ph.D. in physiology at North Carolina State University, then served in the U.S. Army with assign- ments at USARIEM (1977–1981) and at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (1981–1983). After leaving the Army, Dr. Young continued as a civilian scientist at USARIEM. His research has concerned the biological basis for, and strategies to mitigate, performance degradation in people experiencing intense physical exertion, sleep restriction, nutritional depriva- tion, and exposure to extremes of heat, cold, and high altitude, all of which are characteristics of sustained combat operations. Dr. Young is a member of the American Physiological Society and a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. He is also Editor in Chief of the American College of Sports Medicine’s flagship scientific journal, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise.