A
Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Eric Benhamou, Co-Chair, is chair and chief executive officer (CEO) of Benhamou Global Ventures, LLC. Benhamou Global Ventures, started in 2003, invests and plays an active role in innovative high-tech firms throughout the world. Mr. Benhamou is also the chairman of the board of directors of 3Com Corporation and Palm, Inc. He is an adjunct professor of Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise at INSEAD. He served as CEO of Palm, Inc., from October 2001 until October 2003. Mr. Benhamou served as CEO of 3Com Corporation from September 1990 until December 31, 2000. Mr. Benhamou’s professional and personal accomplishments center on the creation and intelligent deployment of information technology toward improving the performance of businesses and nonprofit organizations and the quality of life of individuals around the world. In 1981, Mr. Benhamou cofounded Bridge Communications, an early networking pioneer, and was vice president of engineering until the merger with 3Com in 1987. Before joining Bridge Communications, he worked 4 years at Zilog, Inc., serving as project manager, software engineering manager, and design engineer. In 2003, Mr. Benhamou was appointed to the Joint High Level Advisory Panel of the U.S.- Israel Science and Technology Commission by U.S. Commerce Secretary Donald Evans. In 1997, President Clinton appointed Mr. Benhamou to the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee, which advises the president on research and development focal points of federal programs to maintain



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A Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Eric Benhamou, Co-Chair, is chair and chief executive officer (CEO) of Benhamou Global Ventures, LLC. Benhamou Global Ventures, started in 2003, invests and plays an active role in innovative high-tech firms throughout the world. Mr. Benhamou is also the chairman of the board of directors of 3Com Corporation and Palm, Inc. He is an adjunct profes- sor of Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise at INSEAD. He served as CEO of Palm, Inc., from October 2001 until October 2003. Mr. Benhamou served as CEO of 3Com Corporation from September 1990 until Decem- ber 31, 2000. Mr. Benhamou’s professional and personal accomplishments center on the creation and intelligent deployment of information tech- nology toward improving the performance of businesses and nonprofit organizations and the quality of life of individuals around the world. In 1981, Mr. Benhamou cofounded Bridge Communications, an early net- working pioneer, and was vice president of engineering until the merger with 3Com in 1987. Before joining Bridge Communications, he worked 4 years at Zilog, Inc., serving as project manager, software engineering manager, and design engineer. In 2003, Mr. Benhamou was appointed to the Joint High Level Advisory Panel of the U.S.- Israel Science and Tech- nology Commission by U.S. Commerce Secretary Donald Evans. In 1997, President Clinton appointed Mr. Benhamou to the President’s Informa- tion Technology Advisory Committee, which advises the president on research and development focal points of federal programs to maintain 

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0 ASSESSING ThE IMPACTS OF ChANGES IN ThE IT R&D ECOSySTEM U.S. leadership in advanced computing and communications technologies and their applications. In 1998, Mr. Benhamou was recognized by former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu with the Foreign Investor Jubilee Award. That same year, Mr. Benhamou received the Ellis Island Medal of Honor, which pays homage to the immigrant experience, as well as to individual achievements of U.S. citizens from various ethnic backgrounds. In 1998, he became a fellow of the International Engineer- ing Consortium. He is a graduate of the American Leadership Forum, which seeks to revitalize leadership within communities across the nation. In 1997, Mr. Benhamou received the Medaille Nessim Habif from Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers, Paris. In 1992, he received the President’s Environment and Conservation Challenge Award, the United States’ highest environmental award. Mr. Benhamou currently serves as chairman of the board of Cypress Semiconductor, as lead director of RealNetworks, Inc., and Voltaire, and as a member of the board of direc- tors of Silicon Valley Bancshares. He serves on the board of directors of privately held companies, Contextream, Finjan, and Purewave Networks. He served on the board of the New America Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank until December 2007. Mr. Benhamou serves on the executive committee of TechNet. He was a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) and is a member of the Markle Task Force on Information Security. In addition, he serves on the boards of the INSEAD School of Business, the Stanford University School of Engineering, and Ben Gurion University of the Negev. He is the chair- man of the Israel Venture Network, a venture philanthropy organization for a stronger Israeli society. Mr. Benhamou holds honorary doctoral degrees from Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Widener University, Western Governors University, and the University of South Carolina. He has a Master of Science degree from Stanford University’s School of Engineering and a Diplôme d’Ingénieur from Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers, Paris. Randy H. Katz, Co-Chair, (NAE), is the United Microelectronics Cor- poration Distinguished Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of California, Berkeley. He joined the Berkeley faculty in 1983, where since 1996 he has been the United Micro- electronics Corporation Distinguished Professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the IEEE, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has published more than 250 refereed technical papers, book chapters, and books. His textbook, Contemporary Logic Design, has sold more than 85,000 copies and has been used at more than 200 colleges and universities. A

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 APPENDIX A second edition, cowritten with Gaetano Borriello, was published in 2005. He has supervised 43 M.S. theses and 33 Ph.D. dissertations (including one ACM Dissertation Award winner and eight women), and leads a research team of more than 10 graduate students, technical staff, and academic visitors. Recognitions of Dr. Katz’s work include 13 best-paper awards (including one “test of time” paper award and one selected for a 50-year retrospective on IEEE Communications publications), three best- presentation awards, the Outstanding Alumni Award of the Computer Science Division, the Computing Research Association’s (CRA’s) Out- standing Service Award, the Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award, the Air Force Exceptional Civilian Service Decoration, the IEEE Reynolds Johnson Information Storage Award, the American Society for Engineer- ing Education’s Frederic E. Terman Award, and the ACM Karl V. Karl- strom Outstanding Educator Award. In the late 1980s, with colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, Dr. Katz developed Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID), a $15 billion per year industry sector. While on leave for government service in 1993-1994, he established white house.gov and connected the White House to the Internet. His current research interests are reliable, adaptive distributed systems supported by new services deployed inside the network. His prior research interests have included database management, very large scale integrated circuit (VLSI) computer-aided design (CAD), high performance multiproces- sor (Snoop cache coherency protocols) and storage (RAID) architectures, transport (Snoop TCP) and mobility protocols spanning heterogeneous wireless networks, and converged data and telephony network and service architectures. Dr. Katz received his undergraduate degree from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In May 2007 he received a Doctor of Philosopy (Honoris Causa) from the University of Helsinki. Stephen R. Barley is the Charles M. Pigott Professor of Management Sci- ence and Engineering; the co-director of the Center for Work, Technology and Organization at Stanford University’s School of Engineering; and the co-director of the Stanford/General Motors Collaborative Research Labo- ratory. He holds a Ph.D. in organization studies from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to coming to Stanford in 1994, Dr. Barley served for 10 years on the faculty of the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University. He was editor of the Administratie Sci- ence Quarterly from 1993 to 1997 and the founding editor of the Stanford Social Innoation Reiew from 2002 to 2004. He has served on the editorial boards of the Academy of Management journal, The Journal of Management Studies and Organization Science. Dr. Barley has been the recipient of the Academy of Management’s New Concept Award. He was a member of

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 ASSESSING ThE IMPACTS OF ChANGES IN ThE IT R&D ECOSySTEM the Board of Senior Scholars of the National Center for the Educational Quality of the Workforce and co-chaired the National Research Council committee on the changing occupational structure in the United States that produced the report The Changing Nature of Work in 1999. Dr. Barley has written extensively on the impact of new technologies on work, the organization of technical work, and organizational culture. He edited a volume on technical work, entitled Between Craft and Science: Technical Work in the United States, published in 1997 by Cornell University Press. In collaboration with Gideon Kunda of Tel Aviv University, Dr. Barley recently published a book on contingent work among engineers and software developers, entitled Gurus, hired Guns and Warm Bodies: Itinerant Experts in the Knowledge Economy, with Princeton University Press. Dr. Bar- ley teaches courses on the management of R&D, the organizational impli- cations of technological change, organizational behavior, social network analysis, and ethnographic field methods. He has served as a consultant to organizations in a variety of industries including publishing, banking, computers, electronics, and aerospace. Andrew B. Hargadon is an associate professor of technology management and director of technology management programs at the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Davis. Prior to his aca- demic appointment, he worked as a product designer at IDEO and Apple Computer and taught in the Product Design program at Stanford Uni- versity. Dr. Hargadon’s research focuses on the effective management of innovation, and he has written extensively on knowledge and technology brokering, the role of learning and knowledge management in innovation, and the strategic role of design in managing technology transitions. His research has been used to develop or guide new innovation programs in organizations as diverse as the Canadian Health Services, Silicon Valley start-ups, Hewlett-Packard, and the U.S. Navy. Dr. Hargadon has pub- lished numerous articles and chapters in leading scholarly and applied publications, including harard Business Reiew, Administratie Science Quarterly, Organization Science, California Management Reiew, and Research in Organizational Behaior. He serves on the editorial board of Administra- tie Science Quarterly, Organization Science, Organization Studies, and the Academy of Management Reiew. He teaches corporate executive programs and gives lectures on the creativity, design, and management of innova- tion. He received his Ph.D. from the Management Science and Engineer- ing Department in Stanford University’s School of Engineering, where he was named Boeing Fellow and Sloan Foundation Future Professor of Manufacturing. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Stanford University’s Product Design Program in the Mechanical Engineering Department.

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 APPENDIX A Martin Kenney is a professor in the Department of Human and Com- munity Development at the University of California, Davis, and senior project director, Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, Uni- versity of California, Berkeley. He has authored or edited five books and more than 100 articles on the development of high-technology clusters, the growth of venture capital, and university-related entrepreneurship in the United States, China, and Europe. Dr. Kenney’s current work con- centrates on three areas. His research on services offshoring to India has helped him develop both an important perspective on the issue and a range of contacts and knowledge throughout the Indian outsourcing industry. In another area, Dr. Kenney has been studying the venture capi- tal industry since 1988. More recently, his work in this area has focused on the globalization of venture capital. Finally, Dr. Kenney has advised numerous corporations, universities, governments, and financial institu- tions on a range of issues, including university/industry relationships, economic development, and venture capital. He has keynoted for a major U.S. law firm on offshore outsourcing and participated in World Bank East Asian studies on high-technology clusters and venture capital. He has built a comprehensive database of initial public offerings (IPOs) in the years 1996-2004, from which he is mining a number of novel correlations. He received his Ph.D. in development sociology in 1984 from Cornell University and his B.A. in 1974 and M.A. in 1976, both in sociology, from San Diego State University. Steven Klepper is Arthur Arton Hamerschlag Professor of Economics and Social Science at the Department of Social and Decision Sciences in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. He is also on the faculty of the Tepper School of Business and is an affiliate of the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Car- negie Mellon. His fields of specialization include the evolution of indus- try and the determinants of technological change, statistical procedures to cope with measurement error, and tax compliance. He is an associate editor of Management Science and is on the editorial boards of Economics of Innoation and New Technology and Empirica. He is a research associate in the Centre for Research on Innovation and Competition, the Univer- sity of Manchester, and has served on the National Science Foundation’s Economics Advisory Panel. His books and articles focus on innovation, economic development, economic evolution, and technological change as a factor in the growth and decline of industry. His publications include ”Firm Survival and the Evolution of Oligopoly,” Rand Journal of Economics (2002); ”Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle,” American Economic Reiew (1996); with W. Cohen, ”A Reprise of Size and

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 ASSESSING ThE IMPACTS OF ChANGES IN ThE IT R&D ECOSySTEM R&D,” Economic Journal (1996); with W. Cohen, “Firm Size and the Nature of Innovation Within Industries,” Reiew of Economics and Statistics (1996). He received his Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University in 1975. Edward D. Lazowska (NAE) holds the Bill and Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. His research and teaching concern the design, implementation, and analysis of high performance computing and communication systems. Dr. Lazowska is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He chaired the Computing Research Association board of directors from 1997 to 2001, the National Science Foundation’s Computer and Information Science and Engineering Advisory Committee from 1998 to 1999, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Information Science and Technology Study Group from 2004 to 2006, and the President’s Information Technology Advisory Com- mittee from 2003 to 2005. He served for 6 years on the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB), and has served on a number of NRC study committees, includ- ing the Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology, the Committee on Science and Technology for Countering Terrorism— Panel on Information Technology, the Committee on Research Horizons on Networking, and the Committee to Review the Multi-Agency HPCC Program. He contributed extensively to the CSTB summary report Innoa- tion in Information Technology. Dr. Lazowska received his A.B. from Brown University in 1972 and his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1977, when he joined the University of Washington faculty. Lenny Mendonca is a director (senior partner) in the San Francisco office of McKinsey & Company, Inc., the world’s leading global management consulting firm, where he leads the firm’s knowledge development. Mr. Mendonca is on the Shareholders’ Council of McKinsey (its board of directors), oversees the firm’s communications (including the McKinsey Quarterly), and is chair of the McKinsey Global Institute. He has helped dozens of corporate, government, and nonprofit clients solve their most difficult management challenges. Mr. Mendonca is the chairman of the Bay Area Council, on the board of directors of the Economic Institute of the Bay Area and the Bay Area Science and Innovation Consortium. He is on the board of the New America Foundation, Common Cause, a trustee for the Committee for Economic Development, and on the Advi- sory Council for the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He serves on the board of ChildrenNow, DonorsChoose, and the California Business for Educational Excellence Foundation, and is a member of the Alliance for the San Francisco Unified School District. Mr. Mendonca has led several

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 APPENDIX A McKinsey research efforts. He has written and spoken extensively on glo- balization, corporate social responsibility, economic development, regula- tion, education, energy policy, health care, financial services, and corpo- rate strategy. He received his M.B.A. and certificate in public management from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He holds an A.B., magna cum laude, in economics from Harvard College. Mr. Mendonca is the founder and owner of the Half Moon Bay Brewing Company. David C. Nagel is the former president and CEO of PalmSource, Inc. Before going to PalmSource, Dr. Nagel held leadership positions as chief technology officer (CTO), AT&T; president, AT&T Labs; and CTO, Con- cert (a joint venture of AT&T and British Telecommunications Group). Dr. Nagel also was senior vice president, Apple Computer; and chief of NASA Human Factors Research, NASA Ames Research Center. He has also served on national and international advisory committees, includ- ing the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee and the Federal Communications Commission’s Technology Advisory Council (1999). Dr. Nagel also is a member of the boards of directors of Tessera Technologies, Inc., and Leapfrog Technologies, Inc. He also serves as chairman of Arcsoft, a private developer of software for mobile imaging, and as lead independent director of Epocrates, Inc., a private company and leading provider of medical information systems for mobile devices and the World Wide Web. He has a Ph.D. in psychology (perception and mathematical) and an M.S. and B.S. in engineering, all from the University of California, Los Angeles. He is on the board of trustees of the Interna- tional Computer Science Institute and an emeritus director of the board of the Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose, California. Arati Prabhakar joined U.S. Venture Partners (USVP) in 2001 after 15 years of working with world-class engineers and scientists across many fields to brew new technologies. As a general partner at USVP, her primary focus is fabless semiconductor and semiconductor manufacturing opportuni- ties. She serves on the boards of directors of Arradiance, Kilopass, Kleer, Leadis Technology (NASDAQ: LDIS), Lightspeed Logic, Pivotal Technolo- gies, and SiBeam. Dr. Prabhakar was a program manager and then direc- tor of the Microelectronics Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) from 1986 to 1993. At DARPA, she supported R&D in company and university laboratories in semiconductor manufacturing, imaging, optoelectronics, and nanoelectronics. In 1993, President Clinton appointed her director of the National Institute of Stan- dards and Technology, where she led the 3,000-person staff until 1997. Dr. Prabhakar then joined Raychem Corporation as senior vice president and chief technology officer. She was subsequently vice president and

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 ASSESSING ThE IMPACTS OF ChANGES IN ThE IT R&D ECOSySTEM then president of Interval Research Corporation. Dr. Prabhakar received her B.S. in electrical engineering from Texas Tech University in 1979. She received an M.S. in electrical engineering in 1980 and a Ph.D. in applied physics in 1984 from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). She began her career as a Congressional Fellow at the Office of Technology Assessment in 1984 to 1986. Dr. Prabhakar has been honored as a distin- guished alumna of Texas Tech and of Caltech, and she has been awarded an honorary doctorate from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She is a fellow of the IEEE and serves on advisory boards for Stanford University, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Raj Reddy (NAE) is the Mozah Bint Nasser University Professor of Com- puter Science and Robotics in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He began his academic career as an assistant professor at Stanford University in 1966. He has been a member of the Carnegie Mellon faculty since 1969. He served as the founding director of the Robotics Institute from 1979 to 1991 and as the dean of the School of Com- puter Science from 1991 to 1999. Dr. Reddy’s research interests include the study of human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence. His cur- rent research interests include the Million Book Digital Library Project, a multifunction information appliance that can be used by the uneducated, the Fiber to the Village Project, Mobile Autonomous Robots, and Learn- ing by Doing. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was president of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence from 1987 to 1989. Dr. Reddy was awarded the Legion of Honor by President Mitterand of France in 1984. He was awarded the ACM Turing Award in 1994, the Okawa Prize in 2004, the Honda Prize in 2005, and the Vannevar Bush Award in 2006. He served as co-chair of the President’s Information Tech- nology Advisory Committee from 1999 to 2001 under Presidents Clinton and Bush. Dr. Reddy received a B.E. degree from the Guindy Engineering College of the University of Madras, India, in 1958 and an M.Tech degree from the University of New South Wales, Australia, in 1960. He received a Ph.D. degree in computer science from Stanford University in 1966. Lucinda Sanders is a cofounder of the National Center for Women and Information Technology and currently is executive in residence, Alliance for Technology, Learning and Society (ATLAS) with the University of Colorado. Ms. Sanders developed many years of industry and execu- tive experience in the communications software business, with a broad knowledge base including customer relationship management (CRM) e-business solutions, call-center technologies, and multimedia commu-

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 APPENDIX A nications. From May 1999 to August 2001, she was vice president, Avaya Inc., CRM Solutions R&D and CTO. From August 1996 to May 1999 she served as CTO for Lucent Technologies Customer Care Solutions and from January 1995 to August 1996 she served as department head for Lucent Bell Labs R&D. Ms. Sanders has received numerous awards such as the Distinguished Engineering Alumni Award, Silicon Valley Tribute to Women in Industry, Partner of Choice, Trail Blazer, Touch Award, and Bell Labs President’s Silver Award. She also received the most prestigious Bell Labs award (the Fellow Award), which recognized her for techni- cal excellence in software architectures, participation on teams creating first-to-market solutions for enterprise private branch exchange (PBX) systems, multimedia communication systems (including Voice over IP), and call centers. She has a M.S. in computer science from the University of Colorado and a B.S. in computer science from Louisiana State University and holds six patents. CSTB STAFF joan D. Winston was a program officer for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Research Council from March 2006 through May 2008. She also worked on CSTB studies that produced Preliminary Obserations on DoD Software Research Needs and Priorities: A Letter Report (2008), Social Security Administration Electronic Serice Proision: A Strategic Assessment (2007), and Summary of a Workshop on Software-Intensie Systems and Uncertainty at Scale (2007). She was a con- sultant to CSTB in 2005-2006. Before joining CSTB, she was an assistant director (information technology team) at the Government Accountability Office. From 1998 to 2001, she was principal associate at Steve Walker and Associates, LLC, which managed early-stage venture funds focusing on information technology. From 1995 to 1998, she was director of policy analysis for Trusted Information Systems, Inc. From 1986 to 1995, she held various analytical and project direction positions at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and was recognized as an OTA senior associate in 1993. Before OTA, she worked briefly for the Congres- sional Research Service of the Library of Congress. Ms. Winston started her career as an engineer at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has an S.B. in physics and an S.M. in tech- nology and policy, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. jon Eisenberg is director of the Computer Science and Telecommunica- tions Board of the National Research Council. He has also been study director for a diverse body of work, including a series of studies explor- ing Internet and broadband policy and networking and communications

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8 ASSESSING ThE IMPACTS OF ChANGES IN ThE IT R&D ECOSySTEM technologies. In 1995-1997 he was a Science, Engineering, and Diplomacy Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where he worked on technol- ogy transfer and information and telecommunications policy issues. Dr. Eisenberg received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washing- ton in 1996 and B.S. in physics with honors from the University of Mas- sachusetts at Amherst in 1988. Kristen R. Batch was an associate program officer for the Computer Sci- ence and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council from 2002 to 2008, where she was also involved with projects focusing on the interoperability of voter registration databases and the policy and ethical implications of offensive information warfare and studies that resulted in the following publications: Toward a Safer and More Secure Cyberspace (2007), Engaging Priacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age (2007), Asking the Right Questions About Electronic Voting (2005), Sign- posts in Cyberspace: The Domain Name System and Internet Naigation (2005), A Reiew of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program (2004), and The Internet Under Crisis Conditions: Learning from September  (2002). While pursuing an M.A. in international communications from American University, she interned at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration in the Office of International Affairs and at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in the Technology and Public Policy Program. She received a B.A. from Carnegie Mellon University in literary and cultural studies and Spanish, and received two travel grants to conduct independent research in Spain. Margaret Marsh Huynh, senior program assistant, was with CSTB from January 1999 to November 2007. She supported a number of projects, including Whither Biometrics, Wireless Technology Prospects and Policy, Advancing Software-Intensive Systems Producibility, and Assessing the Impacts of Changes in the Information Technology Research and Devel- opment Ecosystem. She also worked on the projects that produced the reports Signposts in the Cyberspace: The Domain Name Systems and Inter- net Naigation (2005), Getting Up to Speed: The Future of Supercomputing (2004), Beyond Productiity: Information Technology, Innoation, and Creati- ity (2003), IT Roadmap to a Geospatial Future (2002), Building a Workforce for the Information Economy (2001), and The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age (2000). Ms. Huynh also assisted with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration workshop on improving spectrum management through economic and other incen- tives (2006), the Government Accountability Office/NRC forum on infor- mation resource management and the Paperwork Reduction Act (2005), as

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 APPENDIX A well as the workshops on IT issues for the behavioral and social sciences. Prior to coming to the NRC, Ms. Huynh worked as a meeting assistant at Management for Meetings, April to August 1998, and as a meeting assistant at the American Society for Civil Engineers from September 1996 to April 1998. Ms. Huynh has a B.A. (1990) in liberal studies with minors in sociology and psychology from Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. Morgan R. Motto, program associate, has been with CSTB since Decem- ber 2007 supporting several projects, including the Wireless Technology Prospects and Policy, Improving Processes and Policies of Information Technology in the Department of Defense, Future of Libraries and Muse- ums, and the State Voter Registration Databases. Previously, she worked with the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST) on the Human Biomonitoring for Environmental Toxicants, Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites, Applications of Toxicogenomic Technologies to Predictive Toxicology and Risk Assessment, Evaluating the Efficiency of Research and Development Programs at the Environmental Protection Agency, Review of the NIOSH Respiratory Disease Research Program, Review of the Federal Strategy to Address Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials, and Improv- ing Risk Analysis Approaches Used by the U.S. EPA. Prior to coming to the NRC, Ms. Motto worked as project manager for international affairs and technology at the U.S. Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce. She earned a B.A. in International Affairs and East Asian Studies from the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University.