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BIOGRAPHIES OF A COMMITTEE MEMBERS DON P. GIDDENS (NAE), chair, is dean of the College of Engineer- ing (since 1992), Lawrence L. Gellerstedt Jr. Chair in Bioengineering, and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar, Georgia Institute of Technology. After receiving all three of his degrees (B.S.E. 1963, M.S. 1965, and Ph.D. 1966) from Georgia Tech, he joined the faculty there in 1968. Dean Giddens is a member of the National Academy of Engi- neering, the Biomedical Engineering Society, and the Big 10+ Deans Council, a founding fellow and past president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and fellow of the American Heart Association and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He received the H.R. Lissner Award from ASME in 1993 and was the ASME Thurston Lecturer in 1996. In June 2007, he was elected chair of the Executive Board of the Engineering Deans Council of the American Society for Engineering Education. Dr. Giddens is a mem- ber of several advisory boards and councils for academic institutions, corporations, and professional societies. He is also the author of more than 300 refereed publications, book chapters, and presentations and maintains an active research program in cardiovascular hemodynamics at Georgia Tech. 0

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0 CHANGING THE CONVERSATION RICK E. BORChELT is director of communications at the Genetics and Public Policy Center, Berman Bioethics Center, Johns Hopkins University, where he also teaches science policy and politics in the sci- ence writing program. Previously, he was director of communications and public affairs at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an independent research enter- prise. Mr. Borchelt’s varied career includes stints as director of media relations for the National Academy of Sciences; press secretary for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology; special assistant for public affairs in the Executive Office of the President during the Clinton Administration; and director of communications for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. He chaired a three-year study by a blue-ribbon panel of Pulitzer Prize–winning journalists, scientists, public affairs officers, and science writers, funded by DOE and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, on best practices in communicating to the public about science, technology, and health, which culminated in an international conference in March 2002, “Communicating the Future.” Mr. Borchelt is currently an advisor to a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) on nanoscale informal science education. He was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2004 and is a commentary editor for Science Communication. vIRGIL R. CARTER is executive director of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), where his responsibilities include over- seeing budgets, staff, and technical and educational activities, as well as management of the ASME Foundation and affiliated business entities. His professional career spans 42 years and includes military service, executive and ownership positions in business, academic teaching and administration, and association management. After earning a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Oklahoma State University (OSU) in 1964, he served as a captain on a Special Forces A-Team in Vietnam. After the war, he earned a master’s degree in architecture from the University of Illinois in 1969. In 1986, after 17 years of private architectural practice, he returned to OSU as head of the School of Architecture. From 1990

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0 Appendix A to 1996, Mr. Carter was senior executive at the American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C., and in 1996 he founded Business & Educational Advisory Services, in Falls Church, Virginia. In 1997, be became executive director of the Project Management Institute, which experienced a 350 percent net growth in membership and expanded its global membership to 120 countries under his leadership. In 2002, he accepted his current position at ASME. Mr. Carter travels frequently throughout the world in support of ASME, engineering, and technol- ogy. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and a mem- ber of several other organizations, including the American Society of Association Executives, the Pennsylvania Art Association, and the Special Forces Association. WILLIAM S. hAMMACK, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, earned a B.S. in chemical engineering from Michigan Technological University and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. He taught for 10 years at Carnegie Mellon University before returning to Illinois, where he worked on outreach to the public to explain engineering and technology. He has created more than 300 pieces for pubic radio, which have been heard on “Marketplace” and around the world on Radio National Australia, for which he received the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Service to Society Award, the American Society of Mechanical Engineer’s Edwin F. Church Medal, the American Society of Engineering Education’s President’s Award, the IEEE Award for Dis- tinguished Literacy Contributions, the American Chemical Society’s Grady-Stack Award, and the American Institute of Physics Science Writing Award. In addition, he teaches a General Education course on engineering for non-majors. He spent 2005–2006 on leave from the university as a Jefferson Science Fellow at the U.S. Department of State. LEAh h. jAMIESON (NAE) is John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineer- ing and Ransburg Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University; she also has a courtesy appointment in Purdue’s Department of Engineering Education. Dr. Jamieson has been

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0 CHANGING THE CONVERSATION recognized for her achievements as co-founder (with Edward J. Coyle) and co-director (with William C. Oakes) of the Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) Program, which was awarded the National Academy of Engineering’s 2005 Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education. Also for EPICS- related activities, she (and Coyle) received the 1997 Chester F. Carlson Award for Innovation in Engineering Education from the American Society for Engineering Education, and Dean Jamieson received the IEEE Education Society 2000 Harriet B. Rigas “Outstanding Woman Engineering Educator” Award. Dr. Jamieson was one of the inaugural recipients of the NSF Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars (2001), was inducted into Purdue’s Book of Great Teachers (2003), and was named 2002 Indiana Professor of the Year by the Carn- egie Foundation and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education. Dr. Jamieson has conducted research on speech analysis and recognition and the design of parallel processing algorithms and soft- ware for digital speech, image, and signal processing, and is the author of more than 175 papers and co-editor of Algorithmically Specialized Parallel Computers (Academic Press, 1985) and The Characteristics of Parallel Algorithms (MIT Press, 1987). She is 2007 president and CEO of IEEE and has held many other leadership positions at IEEE since 1998. She has also been associate editor and a member of the editorial board for several IEEE publications, a member of the Advisory Com- mittee for the NSF Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (1998–2000), and a member (1998–2001, 2001–2004, 2005–2007) and secretary (1999–2001) of the Board of Directors of the Computing Research Association. She received her S.B. in mathematics from MIT and Ph.D. from Princeton University. jAMES h. jOhNSON, jR., is a professor of civil engineering and dean of the College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences at Howard University. He received his B.S. from Howard University, his M.S. from the University of Illinois, and his Ph.D. from the Uni- versity of Delaware. His research interests include the treatment and disposal of hazardous substances, environmental policy in relation to minorities, nanomaterials in environmental restoration, and envi-

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 Appendix A ronmental curricula and strategies for increasing the participation of underrepresented groups in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines. A member of the National Research Council (NRC) Division of Earth and Life Sciences Oversight Committee, Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Committee on Diversity and Women in Civil Engineering, and vice chair of the Anne Arundel Community College (Maryland) Board of Trustees, he has also served on several university, private-sector, and research-center advisory committees, NRC boards and committees, and government advisory committees. The author of more than 60 scholarly articles, a contributor to three books, and co-editor of two books, Dr. Johnson is a registered profes- sional engineer in the District of Columbia, a diplomate of the Ameri- can Academy of Environmental Engineers, and the 2005 recipient of the National Society of Black Engineers Lifetime Achievement Award in Academia. vIRGINIA KRAMER, executive creative director at the advertising and public relations firm keiler & Co., oversees creative products of all kinds, including print and broadcast advertising, collateral products, direct mail products, and interactive products. Ms. kramer is an award-winning copywriter with broad experience working with clients in a variety of industries, including financial services, banking, insurance, health care, aerospace, high technology, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing, publishing, and the performing arts. Ms. kramer graduated (magna cum laude) from the University of Hartford. She was a participant in the NAE preliminary focus group in April 2005 on public understanding of engineering messaging. PATRICK j. NATALE is executive director of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and the recipient of the 2006 kenneth Andrew Roe Award from the American Association of Engineering Societies. Prior to joining ASCE in 2002, Mr. Natale was executive director of the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), where he had been active in leadership and internal management for many years at both national and state levels. In 1997, Mr. Natale received the NSPE

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 CHANGING THE CONVERSATION Distinguished Service Award, and in July 2000, he was named a Fellow of the society. He was also president, national director, and practice division officer of the New Jersey Society of Professional Engineers. Mr. Natale had a 28-year career at Public Service Electric and Gas Com- pany of New Jersey, where he held many top-level jobs. Over the years, he was responsible for managing sales, marketing, strategic planning, and customer service; he also led the corporate effort to develop the process and systems for deregulating the energy marketplace in New Jersey. Mr. Natale holds a B.S. in civil engineering from Newark College of Engineering and an M.S. in engineering management from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He completed the Executive Manage- ment Program at Yale University and is a licensed professional engineer in New Jersey and a certified association executive. DIETRAM A. SChEUFELE is a professor in the Department of Life Sciences Communication and a member of the steering committee of the Robert F. and Jean E. Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies at the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison. He is also the Wisconsin principle investigator of the National Scence Foundation- funded Center for Nanotechnology in Society, located at Arizona State University, and a member of the Nanotechnology Technical Advisory Group to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. The focus of Dr. Scheufele’s research is shaping public attitudes toward science and technology. He has received the Young Scholar Award for outstanding early research from the International Communication Association, the Young Faculty Teaching Excellence Award from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University, and the Vilas Associate Award from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His professional experience includes consulting work for major marketing firms and public-sector clients, including the Public Broadcasting System and the World Health Organization. Prior to joining UW in 2004, he was a tenured associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Communication at Cornell University.

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 Appendix A jACQUELyN F. SULLIvAN is founding co-director and director of k-12 Engineering Education for the Integrated Teaching and Learning Program at the University of Colorado (CU) at Boulder, a program that is working toward integrating hands-on engineering throughout the k–16 learning experience. In 2008, Sullivan was co-recipient of the National Academy of Engineering Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education, and in 2005 she received the inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award from the k–12 Division of the American Society of Engineering Education. Dr. Sullivan had 13 years of engineering and leadership experience in industry prior to joining CU in 1990, and she was instrumental in founding the university’s Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, which provides hands-on engineering experience to more than 4,000 undergraduates annually. She also initiated a k–12 engineering educa- tion program for teachers and underserved students and is currently leading a multi-institutional initiative to create an online, search- able, standards-based, digital library of k–12 engineering curricula. She heads a U.S. Department of Education and National Science Foundation-funded project, the TEAMS Program (Tomorrow’s Engi- neering—creAte. iMagine. Succeed.) that incorporates weekly hands- on, inquiry-based engineering into engineering and science classes in grades 3 through 12. Dr. Sullivan is a founding board member of the Denver School of Science and Technology—a public, urban high school that incorporates science, engineering, and technology into a humanities-rich setting focused on student achievement. In addi- tion, she is a long-standing member of (and has chaired) the board of directors of a non-profit community school of the arts. She received her Ph.D. in environmental health physics and aquatic toxicology from Purdue University.

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