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Biographical Information Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability

PAMELA A. MATSON (NAS) is Naramore Dean of the School of Earth Sciences and Goldman Professor of Environmental Science at Stanford University. Her current research interests include biogeochemical processes in forest and agricultural systems. Dr. Matson was the first to show that geographic variation in biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems controls variation in the production of the important greenhouse gas N2O. That discovery provided the foundation for her development of global budgets of natural and anthropogenic sources of this and other radiatively significant trace gases. Dr. Matson has served on numerous National Academies’ committees, including the Board on Sustainable Development, the Committee on Research and Peer Review in EPA, the Board on Global Change, and others. She is President of the Ecological Society of America, a member of the Aspen Global Change Institute Advisory Board, and a member of the Institute of Ecosystem Studies Advisory Board. Selected publications include Ecosystem Approach for the Development of a Global Nitrous Oxide Budget; Agricultural Intensification and Ecosystem Properties; and Integration of Environmental, Agronomic, and Economic Aspects of Fertilizer Management. Dr. Matson received her B.S. in Biology from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire; her M.S. in Environmental Science from Indiana University; and her Ph.D. in Forest Ecology from Oregon State University.


EMMY SIMMONS recently retired from the position of Assistant Administrator for Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Ms. Simmons has more than 30 years experience in international agriculture and economic development. Since 1997 she has served as USAID deputy assistant administrator in the former Bureau



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E Biographical Information Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability PAMELA A. MATSON (NAS) is Naramore Dean of the School of Earth Sci- ences and Goldman Professor of Environmental Science at Stanford University. Her current research interests include biogeochemical processes in forest and agricultural systems. Dr. Matson was the first to show that geographic variation in biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems controls variation in the production of the important greenhouse gas N2O. That discovery provided the foundation for her development of global budgets of natural and anthropogenic sources of this and other radiatively significant trace gases. Dr. Matson has served on numerous National Academies’ committees, including the Board on Sustainable Develop- ment, the Committee on Research and Peer Review in EPA, the Board on Global Change, and others. She is President of the Ecological Society of America, a member of the Aspen Global Change Institute Advisory Board, and a member of the Institute of Ecosystem Studies Advisory Board. Selected publications include Ecosystem Approach for the Development of a Global Nitrous Oxide Budget; Agricultural Intensification and Ecosystem Properties; and Integration of Environmental, Agronomic, and Economic Aspects of Fertilizer Management. Dr. Matson received her B.S. in Biology from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire; her M.S. in Environmental Science from Indiana University; and her Ph.D. in Forest Ecology from Oregon State University. EMMY SIMMONS recently retired from the position of Assistant Administra- tor for Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Ms. Simmons has more than 30 years experience in international agriculture and economic development. Since 1997 she has served as USAID deputy assistant administrator in the former Bureau 

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 APPENDIX E for Global Programs, Research and Field Support, where she headed the Center for Economic Growth and Agricultural Development. From 1994 to 1997, Sim- mons was senior program officer for USAID’s mission in Moscow where she oversaw an aid portfolio of more than $1 billion. From 1991 to 1994, she served in USAID’s regional office for east and southern Africa as supervisory program economist. Simmons also has served as supervisory agricultural officer for Mali and as regional agricultural advisor for West Africa, in addition to holding a number of supervisory positions in the Africa Bureau in USAID’s Washington headquarters. She received her B.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwau- kee; her M.S. in Agricultural Economics from Cornell University. MATHEW ARNOLD is a co-founder of Sustainable Finance Ltd. He assists financial institutions and investors in understanding and managing environmental and social risks, and helps them identify environmentally superior investment opportunities. His current clients include Citigroup, JP Morgan Chase, LaSalle Bank, and the Global Environment Fund, a private equity investment company dedicated to environmental investments. He was Chief Operating Officer at the World Resources Institute, a sustainable development think tank. As COO, he was responsible for 140 employees, a $20-million budget and a $45-million endowment. He has served as an advisor on environmental and sustainability strategy for several other multinational corporations including DuPont, where he helped develop the organization’s sustainable growth strategy, and BP, where he helped business unit leaders to align with the company’s post-Amoco merger focus on greening the brand. In 1990, he founded the Management Institute for Environment and Business (MEB) to help business schools and corporations in- tegrate environmental issues into business strategy. In 1996, MEB merged with the World Resources Institute. Prior to 1990, he held positions in marketing with IBM, in investment banking with Merrill Lynch Capital Markets, and in business development with Santa Fe Trading, Hong Kong. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Forest Trends, a market maker for ecosystem services. He holds an AB degree in Psychobiology from Harvard College, an M.A. in International Relations from the Johns Hopkins University, and an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School. ARDEN L. BEMENT, JR. (NAE), Director, National Science Foundation, joined NSF from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, where he had been director since 2001. As head of NIST, he oversaw an agency with an annual budget of about $773 million and an onsite research and administrative staff of about 3,000. Bement previously served as the David A. Ross Distin- guished Professor of Nuclear Engineering and head of the School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University. He has held appointments at Purdue University in the schools of Nuclear Engineering, Materials Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as a courtesy appointment in the Krannert School

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 APPENDIX E of Management. He was director of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium and the Consortium for the Intelligent Management of the Electrical Power Grid. Along with his NIST advisory roles, Bement served as a member of the National Science Board from 1989 to 1995. He also chaired the Commission for Engi- neering and Technical Studies and the National Materials Advisory Board of the National Research Council. Additionally, he was a member of the Space Station Utilization Advisory Subcommittee and the Commercialization and Technology Advisory Committee for NASA and consulted for the Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and the Idaho National Engineering and Environ- mental Laboratory. Prior positions include: vice president of technical resources and of science and technology for TRW Inc. (1980-1992); deputy under secretary of defense for research and engineering (1979-1980); director, Office of Materi- als Science, DARPA (1976-1979); professor of nuclear materials, MIT (1970- 1976); manager, Fuels and Materials Department and the Metallurgy Research Department, Battelle Northwest Laboratories (1965-1970); and senior research associate, General Electric Co. (1954-1965). He has been a director of Keithley Instruments Inc. and the Lord Corp. and was a member of the Science and Tech- nology Advisory Committee for the Howmet Corp. (a division of ALCOA). Be- ment holds an engineer of metallurgy degree from the Colorado School of Mines, a master’s degree in metallurgical engineering from the University of Idaho, a doctorate degree in metallurgical engineering from the University of Michigan, an honorary doctorate degree in engineering from Cleveland State University, and an honorary doctorate degree in science from Case Western Reserve University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. MICHAEL D. BERTOLUCCI is the President of Interface Research Corpora- tion (IRC), Chairman of the Envirosense® Consortium, Inc.—a not-for-profit organization concerned with Indoor Air Quality—and Senior Vice President of Interface, Inc., a billion dollar enterprise with over 5000 employees. With manufacturing sites in seven countries, Interface is the world leader in the sale of modular carpet tiles and commercial interior fabrics. The research arm, along with the various divisions’ R&D laboratories provides fundamental technology to the overall enterprise. As president, Dr. Bertolucci leads not only this effort but also the parent’s mission to become the first name in industrial ecology and to provide new technical solutions for Interface as it strives to reduce its footprint on the environment and to become sustainable. He serves on the boards of several not-for-profit organizations, such as the CEO Coalition to Advance Sustainable Technology (CAST), and the oversight committee of the National Research Council’s Division on Earth and Life Studies (DELS). Prior to coming to the IRC, Mike spent six years as Vice President of Technology for Highland Industries, an industrial fabrics company, fifteen years in numerous research and development management posts with the General Electric Plastics Business Group, and four years in chemical research at Union Carbide Chemicals and Plastics. Dr. Berto-

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0 APPENDIX E lucci received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology, and his B.S. degree in Chemistry from San Jose State. JOHN CARBERRY is Director of Environmental Technology for the DuPont Company in Wilmington, Delaware where he has been employed since 1965. He is responsible for recommendations on technical programs for DuPont based on an analysis of environmental issues. Since 1989, he has led this technology function in a transition to increasingly emphasize waste prevention and product stewardship while maintaining excellence in treatment. Externally, Mr. Carberry is a past Chair of the standing National Academy Committee on the Destruc- tion of the Non-Stockpile Chemical Weapons, a founding member of the Green Power Market Development Group and of the Vision2020 Steering Committee, and a member of the NAE Committees on; Technologies for Sequestering CO2, and Metrics for Documenting Progress in Global Change Research. Since 1990, John has served on four other National Academy Committees and has presented 30 lectures on environmental issues at 18 universities, given invited presenta- tions at 63 public conferences worldwide and provided 21 literature interviews, or contributions. He holds a B.ChE. and an M.E. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University and an MBA from the University of Delaware. LESLIE CAROTHERS is President of the Environmental Law Institute. ELI is an independent, non-partisan education and research organization working to protect the environment by improving law, policy, and management. She has been a professional environmentalist for over 30 years. Before her election as ELI president in June 2003, she served for 11 years as Vice President, Environ- ment, Health and Safety at United Technologies Corporation (UTC) in Hartford, a diversified manufacturer of products for the aerospace and building systems markets. She also served as Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection from 1987-1991 and Senior Environmental Counsel for PPG Industries, a manufacturing company in Pittsburgh, from 1982-1987. She began her environmental career with the federal Environmental Protection Agency in the air pollution program in Washington in 1971 and later served as Enforcement Director, Deputy Regional Administrator, and Acting Regional Administrator of EPA’s New England Region in Boston. In 1991, she was an adjunct lecturer on environmental regulation at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. She is a past member and Chair of the Board of Directors of the Connecticut Audubon Society and the Environmental Law Institute and a past member of the Board of the Nature Conservancy (Connecticut Chapter). She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Strategies for the Global Environ- ment (Pew Center on Global Climate Change). She is a graduate of Smith College and Harvard Law School and also holds a Masters Degree in environmental law from George Washington University.

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 APPENDIX E WILLIAM CLARK (NAS) is the Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy and Human Development at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Trained as an ecologist, his research fo- cuses on the interactions of environment, development and security concerns in international affairs. Clark serves on the scientific advisory committees for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Initiative, the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change and the Potsdam In- stitute for Climate Impacts Research. He is co-author of Adaptive environmental assessment and management (Wiley, 1978) and Redesigning rural development (Hopkins, 1982); editor of the Carbon dioxide review (Oxford, 1982); and coedi- tor of Sustainable development of the biosphere (Cambridge, 1986), The earth transformed by human action (Cambridge, 1990), Learning to manage global environmental risks (MIT, 2001), and Environment magazine. He co-chaired the recent study by the US National Research Council on Our Common Journey: A Transition Toward Sustainability. Clark is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the MacArthur Prize, the Humboldt Prize, and the Kennedy School’s Carballo Award for excellence in teaching. JOHN C. DERNBACH is a Professor of Law at Widener University and the former director of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) Office of Policy. DEP’s Office of Policy identifies key issues, coordinates the development of regulations and policy initiatives, tracks and reviews all pro- posed rulemakings, and helps to provide long-range direction on a broad range of departmental goals and objectives. From 1981 to 1993, Dernbach held various posts with DEP’s precursor, the Department of Environmental Resources, wrap- ping up his tenure there as director of the Advanced Science and Research Team. Dernbach also has been a professor at Widener University Law School since 1993, teaching classes in environmental law, international environmental law, property and administrative law and conducting seminars on global warming and sustainability. He also has extensive international environmental law experience, serving as a visiting lecturer at the University of Geneva’s Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2003; at Macquarie University Law School in Sydney, Australia, in 1999; and at the University of Nairobi Law School in Nairobi, Kenya, in 1996. He is the editor of Stumbling Toward Sus- tainability (Environmental Law Institute, 2002), a comprehensive assessment of U.S. sustainable development efforts over the past decade. Dernbach attended the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, graduating summa cum laude and receiving his bachelor’s degree in science in 1975. Dernbach received his juris doctor from the University of Michigan Law School in 1978, graduating cum laude. SAM DRYDEN is a Managing Director of Wolfensohn & Company, a corporate advisory and investment firm located in New York, where he focuses on private equity investments in biofuels and other alternative energies. He is also CEO of

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 APPENDIX E Emergent Genetics, LLC. Until June 2006, Sam served as the Chair and Corpo- rate CEO of Emergent Genetics, Inc. The majority of the Company was acquired in April 2005 by the Monsanto Company and its remaining operations were acquired in June 2006 by Syngenta AG. Sam began his career as an Analyst with the US Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis, with responsi- bilities for modeling and forecasting selected sectors of the US economy. He was then employed by the Union Carbide Corporation from 1974 to 1980. In 1980, Sam led the spin-out of Union Carbide’s biotechnologies and related business operations and was subsequently co-founder, President and CEO of Agrigenetics Corporation. Sam was also chairman of an affiliated partnership which managed and invested $60 million in proprietary plant sciences research conducted in leading universities, as well as private and public research institutions worldwide. Sam founded and was President of Big Stone Inc.—a private venture-investment and development company focused on the life sciences. Sam also served as the non-executive chairman of Celgro Inc. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Global Crop Diversity Trust. He has been an advisor to the Rockefeller, McKnight and MacArthur Foundations and a member of the Design Advisory Committee and Scientific Advisory Board of its African Agricultural Technology Foundation. Sam is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on its Advisory Committee on Intellectual Property and American Competitive- ness. He has written and lectured widely on the policy issues of food security, the evolving nature of global public goods and new mechanisms for public and private sector relations. In this regard, his travels have taken him on missions to most countries in Latin America, including Cuba, as well as Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Sam, a native of eastern Kentucky, received his B.A. degree in economics from Emory University in 1973. KATHRYN FULLER is the Chair of the Board of Trustees, Ford Founda- tion and the former President and CEO of the World Wildlife Fund. Trained as both a lawyer and a biologist, Fuller took over the helm of the world’s largest international conservation organization in 1989 after seven years serving first as director of WWF’s wildlife trade monitoring program, then general counsel and executive vice president. Prior to joining WWF, she headed the Wildlife and Marine Resources Section of the Justice Department’s Land and Natural Resources Division. At WWF, Fuller’s emphasis has been on innovative conserva- tion methods such as debt-for-nature swaps, conservation trusts, the inclusion of women in grass roots projects and creative partnerships to conduct conservation on large, eco-regional scales. Examples of large-scale projects undertaken dur- ing Fuller’s tenure include creation of the world’s first conservation trust fund for Bhutan and a partnership with the World Bank and the government of Brazil to triple the amount of rainforest under strict protection in the Amazon. In her 15 years as president and CEO, WWF has also doubled its membership, tripled its revenue and expanded its presence around the globe. She is a recipient of the

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 APPENDIX E U.N. Environment Programme’s Global 500 award and holds several honorary doctorates. Ms. Fuller also chairs the board of trustees of the Ford Foundation and sits on several other non-profit and corporate boards. She is a trustee of Brown University and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Fuller received her B.A. from Brown University and did graduate studies in marine, estuarine and environmental science at the University of Maryland. GEORGE M. GRAY is the Assistant Administrator of the Office of Research and Development at US EPA. Prior to this position, Gray was Executive Direc- tor of the Harvard University Center for Risk Analysis (HCRA) and a lecturer at the University’s Department of Health Policy and Management. Gray’s primary research interests at Harvard included the characterization and communication of risk with a focus on food safety, agriculture, and chemicals in the environment. In addition to his post at HCRA, Gray serves on advisory committees for the So- ciety of Toxicology, the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences. He is also a member of the Environmental Literacy Council. Dr. Gray holds a B.S. in biology from the University of Michigan and a M.S. and Ph.D. in toxicology from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. F. HENRY “HANK” HABICHT II currently serves as Managing Partner of SAIL Venture Partners, a leading venture capital fund investing in leading-edge clean energy, water, and related technologies. Prior to his SAIL affiliation, Mr. Habicht served as CEO of the Global Environment & Technology Foundation (GETF), where he now serves as Vice Chairman. He is a founding Principal of Capital E, LLC. Previously, Mr. Habicht was Senior Vice President of Safety- Kleen Corporation, a provider of industrial and recycling services to 400,000 customers with sales of over $1 billion. Prior to his position with Safety-Kleen, Mr. Habicht was Chief Operating Officer of U.S. EPA under Administrator William K. Reilly. Mr. Habicht initiated quality-oriented management improve- ments to improve planning and integrate U.S. EPA’s diverse science, policy and enforcement functions. In addition, Mr. Habicht chaired or served on several in- teragency work groups concerning risk assessment, energy, transportation, trade, and technology promotion. From 1987 to 1989 Mr. Habicht was with William D. Ruckelshaus Associates as Vice President and Counsel. Prior to this position, Mr. Habicht was Assistant Attorney General of the United States where he directed the Land and Natural Resources Division with responsibility for all federal envi- ronmental enforcement, energy and natural resource litigation. Mr. Habicht is a member of numerous boards and advisory councils. He has served as a Member of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board; and is currently on the Steering Committee of the Energy Future Coalition; Chairman of Board of Resolve, Inc.; Director of 3E Company; and as a Member of NREL National Advisory Board; and the President’s Advisory Committee on Trade Policy and Negotiation; and the

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 APPENDIX E Advisory Board for the National Leadership Summits for a Sustainable America. He also serves on the Dow Chemical Corporate Environmental Advisory Council, and the Princeton Environmental Institute and the National Pollution Prevention Roundtable Advisory Boards. Hank received a J.D. at the University of Virginia and A.B. at Princeton University. JEREMY HARRIS recently completed his second and final term as Mayor of the City and County of Honolulu, Hawaii. As a trained environmentalist, Mayor Harris deeply appreciates the effects that government policy has on the world’s ecosystems. Under his direction, the City and County of Honolulu has made great advances in curtailing urban sprawl, while preserving open space and prime agricultural lands. He has initiated numerous educational and volunteer programs to fight water pollution, preserve Honolulu’s waters, and to recycle everything from paper and glass, to asphalt and construction materials. Mayor Harris is intensively involved in the multi-billion-dollar renovation of the Island’s sewer system, as well as in a partnership with private industry to reclaim wastewater for agricultural and industrial uses. Before serving as Mayor, he worked for eight years as the City’s Managing Director. In this capacity, Mayor Harris was a major force in the development of Honolulu’s H-Power program, which uses trash as fuel to generate electricity. In its first six years of operation, the plant processed over four million tons of waste and generated electricity that would have other- wise would have required five million barrels of oil. Mayor Harris specialized in Marine Biology and Urban Ecosystems, obtaining his Master’s Degree from the University of California at Irvine. ROSALYN S. HOBSON, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, School of En- gineering at Virginia Commonwealth University, is an educator, researcher, and engineer. Her research interests include artificial neural networks and their ap- plication to control problems, intelligent systems, biological modeling and signal processing. As one of the founding faculty members of the School of Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University, she has been instrumental in the establish- ment and success of the engineering program. She has established a partnership program between VCU and schools in South Africa and is designing a new en- gineering education program focused on engineering challenges in developing countries. She has served on and chaired numerous committees and developed a research group and laboratory in which projects on neural network applications are conducted. She has been awarded grants from industry and government, di- rected the research of numerous undergraduate and graduate students, published several articles and has been an invited lecturer in many venues. Additionally she was awarded a AAAS science and diplomacy fellowship to serve at the US Agency for International Development. Officially posted in the USAID Office of Education, Dr. Hobson served as the principal liaison between USAID and the National Academies for a study examining science and technology in US

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 APPENDIX E development assistance programs. She also served as a consultant for Invensys Control Systems. Dr. Hobson continues her work with numerous Richmond high schools and with outreach and summer programs that focus on promoting interest in and recruiting students into the engineering profession. Dr. Hobson’s awards and honors include: the National Society of Black Engineers’ Patricia A Lumpkin Educator of the Year Award, and the Frontiers in Education New Faculty Fellow. She served on the National Academy of Engineering Commit- tee on Engineering Education and was selected for participation in the Stanford University National Science Foundation New Century Scholars Workshop. She has been nominated for the American Biographical Institute 1000 World Leaders of Scientific Influence and Who’s Who of American Women 2000. Dr. Hobson received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. (1997) in Electrical Engineering from the University of Virginia. JACK A. KAYE is the Director of the Research and Analysis Program of the Earth-Sun System Division in NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. In this posi- tion, he has responsibility for the broad range of science research carried out in Earth and solar science at NASA centers, academia, other government agencies, and the private sector. Prior to being assigned to this position, he worked as a research scientist, program manager for atmospheric chemistry, and Research Division director for the former Office of Earth Science over his 21 year career at NASA. He represents NASA in numerous interagency activities related to cli- mate, oceans, and Earth observations, and he serves as a member of the Steering Committee for the Global Climate Observing System. Among his many awards is his recognition in 2004 as a Meritorious Senior Executive. He is trained in chemistry, having received a B.A. from Adelphi University and a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. GERALD T. KEUSCH (IOM) is Director of the Global Health Initiative, Assis- tant Provost of the Medical Campus, and Associate Dean of the School of Public Health at Boston University. Prior to joining the university, Dr. Keusch was the Associate Director for International Research at the National Institutes of Health, and Director of the Fogarty International Center. He has been involved in clini- cal medicine, teaching and research for his entire career. Dr. Keusch’s research has ranged from the molecular pathogenesis of tropical infectious diseases to field research in nutrition, immunology, host susceptibility, and the treatment of tropical infectious diseases and HIV/AIDS. He is involved in international health research and policy issues within the NIH, the Institute of Medicine, and the World Health Organization. Under his leadership, the programs of the Fog- arty International Center have greatly expanded to address not only the pressing global issues in infectious diseases and the growing burden of non-communicable diseases, but also the critical cross-cutting issues such as the ethical conduct of research, intellectual property rights and global public goods, stigma, and the

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 APPENDIX E impact of improved health on economic development. Dr. Keusch is a graduate of Columbia College and Harvard Medical School, and he is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. KAI LEE is the Program Officer in the Conservation & Science Program at the David and Lucille Packard Foundation and former Rosenburg Professor of Environmental Studies at Williams College. He served as director of the Center for Environmental Studies at Williams College from 1991-1998 and is interim director in 2001-2002. Lee has continued to teach and conduct research on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance and is currently undertaking a study of urban sustainability. He was chair of the Com- mittee on Long-Term Institutional Management of DOE Legacy Waste Sites at the National Research Council, 2001-2003. He serves now on the Water Science and Technology Board at the National Academies. He served on the National Research Council’s Board on Sustainable Development and altogether Lee has served on eleven committees of the National Academies of the National Research Council: the Environmental Studies Board (1980-1982), the Board on Radioac- tive Waste Management (1983-88), the Committee to Assess Safety and Technical Issues at Department of Energy Reactors (1986-1987), the mitigation sub-panel of the Panel on Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming (1989-1991), the Committee on Environmental Research (1991-1993), the Committee on Protec- tion and Management of Pacific Northwest Anadromous Salmonids (1993-1995), the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (1993-1995); the Board on Sustainable Development (1995-99); the Commission on Geosciences, Envi- ronment, and Resources (1996-99); the Committee on Long-Term Institutional Management of DOE Legacy Waste Sites: Phase 2 (2001-2003), and the Water Science and Technology Board (2004-2007). Additionally, in 1989 Lee was a member of the United Nations Environment Programme committee reviewing economic aspects of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. Lee was educated in experimental physics at Columbia (A.B. magna cum laude, 1966) and Princeton (Ph.D., 1971). J. TODD MITCHELL has served as chairman of HARC’s board of directors since 2000 and was president of HARC from 2001 to 2006. Mr. Mitchell has a BA in Geology from The Colorado College (1981), and an MA in Geology from The University of Texas at Austin (1987). He has worked extensively in the en- ergy industry, first as a co-founder of Strand Energy, an oil and gas exploration company, and later as co-founder of Rock Solid Images, a developer of seismic and petrophysical tools for reservoir characterization and imaging. Mr. Mitchell served on the board of directors of Mitchell Energy & Development Corp. for seven years, and is currently a director of Devon Energy, one of the country’s largest producers of natural gas. From September 2006 to 2007, Mr. Mitchell was

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 APPENDIX E enrolled at the Centre for the Study of Environmental Change and Sustainability (Edinburgh, Scotland), where he focused on clean energy technology. MARK MYERS is the Director of the U.S. Geological Survey. He is an inter- nationally recognized geologist and former State Geologist and head of Alaska’s Geological Survey. Mr. Myers, an expert on North Slope sedimentary and petro- leum geology, served as survey chief for field programs in the MacKenzie Delta (ARCO, 1985), Cook Inlet (State of Alaska/U.S. Geological Survey, 1997), and North Slope (ARCO, 1999). He also served as sedimentologist for 13 other North Slope field programs. Mr. Myers is a past president and board member of the Alaska Geological Society; a certified professional geologist with the American Institute of Professional Geologists; a certified petroleum geologist with the American Association of Petroleum Geologists; and a licensed geologist with the State of Alaska. He served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force Reserve from 1977 to 2003, retiring as a Lt. Colonel. Mr. Myers received his doctorate in geology from the University of Alaska-Fairbanks in 1994, specializing in sedimentology, clastic depositional environments, surface and subsurface sequence analysis, and sandstone petrography. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in geology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. RAY ORBACH is Under Secretary-Designate for Science at the Department of Energy (DOE). Prior to his nomination, Dr. Orbach served as Director of DOE’s Office of Science. In this capacity, Dr. Orbach has managed an organization that is the third largest Federal sponsor of basic research in the United States, the primary supporter of the physical sciences in the U.S., and among the premier science organizations in the world. The Office of Science fiscal year 2006 budget of $3.6 billion funds programs in high energy and nuclear physics, basic energy sciences, magnetic fusion energy, biological and environmental research, and computational science. The Office of Science also provides management over- sight of 10 DOE non-weapons laboratories, supports researchers at more than 275 colleges and universities nationwide, and builds and operates a suite of scientific facilities and instruments used annually by more than 19,000 researchers to ex- tend the frontiers of all areas of science. From 1992 to 2002, Dr. Orbach served as Chancellor of the University of California (UC), Riverside. Under his leadership, UC Riverside doubled in size, achieved national and international recognition, and led the University of California in diversity and educational opportunity. Dr. Orbach’s research in theoretical and experimental physics has resulted in the pub- lication of more than 240 scientific articles. He has received numerous honors as a scholar including two Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowships, the Joliot Curie Professorship at the Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielle de la Ville de Paris, the 1991-1992 Andrew Lawson Memorial Lecturer at UC River- side, and the 2004 Arnold O. Beckman Lecturer in Science and Innovation at the

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 APPENDIX E University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Orbach received his Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1956. He received his Ph.D. degree in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1960 and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. LARRY PAPAY (NAE) is a private consultant, recently retired as Sector Vice President for the Integrated Solutions Sector of SAIC. He was responsible for business dealing with the integration of technology in the energy, environment and information areas for a variety of governmental and commercial clients worldwide. Prior to joining SAIC, Dr. Papay served as the Senior Vice President and General Manger of Bechtel Technology and Consulting as well as Senior Vice President of Southern California Edison Company. In February 2004, Dr. Papay was appointed to the Homeland Security Science and Technology Com- mittee by Dr. Charles E. McQueary, Under Secretary for Science and Technol- ogy of the Department of Homeland Security. Prior to joining the Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee, Dr. Papay served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Nuclear Society and was recently elected to the NAE Council. Other present and past committee memberships include The National Academies Coordinating Committee on Global Change, the Charles Stark Draper Prize Committee, and the Committee on Science Engineering and Public Policy. Papay received a B.S. in Physics from Fordham University, and both a M.S. and Sc.D. in Nuclear Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. MERLE D. PIERSON serves as Deputy Under Secretary for Research, Educa- tion, and Economics (REE) at the United States Department of Agriculture. He previously served as Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and Acting Under Secretary for Food Safety. As Deputy Under Secretary, Pierson provides leadership to the four agencies that comprise the Research, Education and Economics mission area: the Agricultural Research Service; the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service; the Economic Research Service; and the National Agricultural Statistics Service. While serving in the area of food safety, he had responsibility for overseeing FSIS policies and programs and the U.S. Codex Alimentarius office. Prior to his USDA appointment, Pierson served as Professor of Food Microbiology and Safety at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) from 1970 to 2005. Pierson is a Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Pierson is internation- ally recognized for his work on food safety management, in particular, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) and research on the reduction and control of foodborne pathogens. He has authored or co-authored more than 150 articles and 7 books on food safety and quality in addition to presenting numerous

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 APPENDIX E workshops on HACCP and food safety management. Pierson received his B.S. in biochemistry from Iowa State University and M.S. and Ph.D. in food science from the University of Illinois. PRABHU PINGALI is an economist and Director of the Division of Agricul- tural and Development Economics at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is the President of the International Association of Agricultural Economists (IAAE). Pingali was Vice-President of the IAAE from 1997-2000 and chairman of the program committee for the 24th International Conference of Agricultural Economists. Pingali has more than 20 years experience in assessing the extent and impact of technical change in developing country agriculture in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Before joining FAO, Pingali was Director of the Economic Program at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in, Mexico, the International Rice Research Institute at Los Baños, Philippines and the World Bank’s Agriculture and Rural Development Department. An Indian national, Pingali earned his doctorate in Economics at North Carolina State Uni- versity in 1982 in Raleigh, North Carolina, in the United States. PETER H. RAVEN (NAS) is the Director of the Missouri Botanical Garden and Engelmann Professor of Botany at Washington University. His research interests include evolution of the plant family Onagraceae, conservation biology, biodiversity, and biogeography. Dr. Raven is former president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and served as a member of President Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, where he has served on numerous boards and committees, has been the Home Secretary, and is currently the Chair of the Division on Earth and Life Studies (DELS). Dr Raven received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. ROBERT STEPHENS founded and served as President of the Multi-State Working Group on Environmental Performance (MSWG), a national coalition of representatives from government, business, non-governmental organizations, and academic institutions in the US working on transformative policies relating to the environment and sustainable development. Via his continued involvement with the MSWG, Dr. Stephens serves as the Secretariat to the Best Practice Net- work for Sustainable Development (BPN) for the United Nations Environment Program, Division of Technology, Industry, and Economics. Dr. Stephens retired in July 2004 from the California EPA after 30 years of service, most recently as Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management and Sustainability. In this position, Dr Stephens was responsible for the development and implementation of programs leading to environmental policy innovation and sustainability in California. Over his career, Dr. Stephens also served as Deputy Director of the Department of Toxic Substances Control for Science, Pollution Prevention, and

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00 APPENDIX E Technology and Chief of the Hazardous Materials Laboratory for the state of California. Dr. Stephens is the primary and/or co-author of some 60 articles and book chapters ranging from basic environmental science and risk assessment to public policy related to the environment and sustainability. Dr. Stephens holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California and has held prior positions in industry and academia. CHARLENE WALL manages the North American Eco-efficiency Analysis pro- gram for the BASF Group. She furthers BASF’s position as a global leader by facilitating the integration of sustainable development into the North American businesses. In 1992, she joined BASF Corporation, and has held positions in Product Development, Process Design Engineering and Safety and Ecology. In addition, she is the first chairperson for the American Institute of Chemical Engineer’s Center for Sustainable Technology Practices. STAFF MARTY PERREAULT serves as the director of the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability. The National Academies have established the Sci- ence and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) in the division of Policy and Global Affairs to encourage the use of science and technology to achieve long term sustainable development—increasing incomes, improving public health, and sustaining critical natural systems. She was previously the program director for the National Academies’ Keck Futures Initiative, a 15-year effort to catalyze in- terdisciplinary inquiry and to enhance communication among researchers, public and private funding organizations, universities, and the general public. Prior to joining the National Academies, Marty was the Vice President for Community Initiatives with the Orange County (CA) United Way. Before that she was the Manager of Community Services for the American Red Cross National Head- quarters. She received her master’s degree in Industrial Engineering with a focus on Health Systems from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. PATRICIA KOSHEL is a senior program officer with the National Academies’ Policy and Global Affairs Division. She has been the staff lead for a consensus study on science and technology in US Foreign Assistance Programs and has also worked on the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program. Before join- ing the National Academies, Pat was the Director of Bilateral Programs in the Of- fice of International Affairs at the US Environmental Protection Agency. Before that she was the Energy and Environmental Policy Advisor for the US Agency for International Development. She has a master’s degree in economics. DEREK VOLLMER is the Program Associate for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) at the National Academies. In this position, he

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0 APPENDIX E supports a variety of program activities including the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability and a joint energy and air pollution between the NAE and the Chinese Academies. He has also helped develop a program on urban environmental sustainability and supported the “Strengthening Science-Based Decision Making” workshop series. He is concurrently pursuing his M.S. in En- vironmental Science and Policy at Johns Hopkins University. Before moving to Washington, Derek lived in Yanji, China, teaching English and music at a techni- cal school as part of the Salesian Lay Missioners program. He graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Notre Dame in 2002 with a B.A. in Govern- ment and International Studies, where he wrote an honors thesis detailing China’s role in global climate change. He speaks Mandarin Chinese and French. KATHLEEN MCALLISTER is the Senior Program Assistant for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) at the National Academies. Before joining The National Academies, she attended Lehigh University and graduated with highest honors as well as departmental honors in 2006 with a B.A. in Sociology. Kathleen wrote an honors thesis on social implications of human trafficking into the United States and worked throughout her college career as a Research Assistant for Professors of Sociology at Lehigh University. She also speaks conversational Spanish, and has had internships in the offices of U.S. Representative Paul E. Kanjorski and U.S. Senator Arlen Specter.

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